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I am having a problem getting bash to do exactly what I want, it's not a major issue, but annoying.

1.) I have a third party software I run that produces some output as stderr. Some of it is useful, some of it is regularly stuff I don't care about and I don't want this dumped to screen, however I do want the useful parts of the stderr dumped to screen. I figured the best way to achieve this was to pass stderr to a function, then use conditions in that function to either show the stderr or not.

2.) This works fine. However the solution I have implemented dumped out my errors at the right time, but then returns a bash prompt and I want to summarise the status of the errors at the end of the function, but echo-ing here prints the text after the prompt meaning that I have to press enter to get back to a clean prompt. It shall become clear with the example below.

My error stream generator:

./TestErrorStream.sh

#!/bin/bash
echo "test1" >&2

My function to process this:

./Function.sh

#!/bin/bash
function ProcessErrors()
{
    while read data;
    do
    echo Line was:"$data"
    done
    sleep 5 # This is used simply to simulate the processing work I'm doing on the errors.
    echo "Completed"
}

I source the Function.sh file to make ProcessErrors() available, then I run:

2> >(ProcessErrors) ./TestErrorStream.sh

I expect (and want) to get:

user@user-desktop:~/path$ 2> >(ProcessErrors) ./TestErrorStream.sh
Line was:test1
Completed 
user@user-desktop:~/path$

However what I really get is:

user@user-desktop:~/path$ 2> >(ProcessErrors) ./TestErrorStream.sh
Line was:test1
user@user-desktop:~/path$ Completed

And no clean prompt. Of course the prompt is there, but "Completed" is being printed after the prompt, I want to printed before, and then a clean prompt to appear.

NOTE: This is a minimum working example, and it's contrived. While other solutions to my error stream problem are welcome I also want to understand how to make bash run this script the way I want it to.

Thanks for your help

Joey

share|improve this question
    
So you have something that produces [all or part of its] output to stderr, and you want to extract and display part of that stream? A 2>&1 ought to mix it into the stdout stream, if that's acceptable, and then a standard pipe and filter program could extract what you want and discard the rest. Can your Linux implementation directly pipe stderr into a filter (2|filtername)? – Phil Perry May 29 '14 at 14:06
    
Hi Phil, Yes exactly I only want to display part of the error stream. I can't mix stdout and stderr because actually what I really want to do it filter three things ... useless stderr, useful stderr and useful stdout. And keep them separate. I'm not sure if my distro handels filters, in fact I don't know how to construct a filter. – Joey O May 29 '14 at 14:12
    
A filter would simply be a program or script that reads stdin (console) and does whatever with it (perhaps writing useful output to stdout). You might even be able to write the saved content to stderr as output of the filter. – Phil Perry May 29 '14 at 14:15
    
    
Process substitution is asynchronous, so you have no control over whether its output appears before or after TestErrorStream.sh exits. – chepner May 29 '14 at 15:05

Your problem is that the while loop stay stick to stdin until the program exits. The release of stdin occurs at the end of the "TestErrorStream.sh", so your prompt is almost immediately available compared to what remains to process in the function.

I suggest you wrap the command inside a script so you'll be able to handle the time you want before your prompt is back (I suggest 1sec more than the suspected time needed for the function to process the remaining lines of codes)

I successfully managed to do this like that :

./Functions.sh

#!/bin/bash
function ProcessErrors()
{
    while read data;
    do
    echo Line was:"$data"
    done
    sleep 5 # simulate required time to process end of function (after TestErrorStream.sh is over and stdin is released)
    echo "Completed"
}

./TestErrorStream.sh

#!/bin/bash
echo "first"
echo "firsterr" >&2
sleep 20 # any number here

./WrapTestErrorStream.sh

#!/bin/bash
source ./Functions.sh
2> >(ProcessErrors) ./TestErrorStream.sh
sleep 6 # <= this one is important

With the above you'll get a nice "Completed" before your prompt after 26 seconds of processing. (Works fine with or without the additional "time" command)

user@host:~/path$ time ./WrapTestErrorStream.sh
first
Line was:firsterr
Completed

real    0m26.014s
user    0m0.000s
sys     0m0.000s
user@host:~/path$

Note: the process substitution ">(ProcessErrors)" is a subprocess of the script "./TestErrorStream.sh". So when the script ends, the subprocess is no more tied to it nor to the wrapper. That's why we need that final "sleep 6"

share|improve this answer
#!/bin/bash

function ProcessErrors {
    while read data; do
        echo Line was:"$data"
    done
    sleep 5 
    echo "Completed"
}

# Open subprocess
exec 60> >(ProcessErrors)
P=$!

# Do the work
2>&60 ./TestErrorStream.sh

# Close connection or else subprocess would keep on reading
exec 60>&-

# Wait for process to exit (wait "$P" doesn't work). There are many ways
# to do this too like checking `/proc`. I prefer the `kill` method as
# it's more explicit. We'd never know if /proc updates itself quickly
# among all systems. And using an external tool is also a big NO.
while kill -s 0 "$P" &>/dev/null; do
    sleep 1s
done

Off topic side-note: I'd love to see how posturing bash veterans/authors try to own this. Or perhaps they already did way way back from seeing this.

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