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I’m new to R, trying to do some analyses of data from sound files. I’ve gotten as far as figuring out how to convert my recordings to measurements (of spectral energy), how to import those measurements into an R matrix, and how to melt that matrix into a column. But I’m stuck on an intermediate step. When I create my data matrices of measurements, each matrix is 12 columns by 360 rows. What I need to do is create new matrices with columns containing the “Delta” (change) values between each of the original 12 columns. So e.g. if my original matrix is

[,1]     [,2]   [,3]
1        2      3
2        4      6
3        6      9
4        8      12

I need to end up with a derived matrix:

[,1]    [,2]-[,1]     [,2]   [,3]-[,2]     [,3]
1           1         2          1         3
2           2         4          2         6
etc.

I can make individual difference columns using simple matrix subtraction, as in

coldif1<-X[,2] - X[,1]

but I can’t figure out how to create the resulting matrix I need. Interleaving the difference columns is important because in the end I’ll need to melt(X) to convert the whole thing into a single stacked column with the values in order, as in:

[,1]
[,2]-[,1]
[,2]
[,3]-[,2]
[,3]
etc.

Is there a straightforward way to do this?

share|improve this question

A way could be:

set.seed(11); mat = matrix(sample(12), 4, 3)
#> mat
#     [,1] [,2] [,3]
#[1,]    4    9   12
#[2,]    1    7   10
#[3,]    6    8    3
#[4,]   11    2    5
tmp = mat[, -1] - mat[, -ncol(mat)]
#> tmp
#     [,1] [,2]
#[1,]    5    3
#[2,]    6    3
#[3,]    2   -5
#[4,]   -9    3
cbind(mat, tmp)[, order(c(seq_len(ncol(mat)), seq_len(ncol(tmp))))]
#     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
#[1,]    4    5    9    3   12
#[2,]    1    6    7    3   10
#[3,]    6    2    8   -5    3
#[4,]   11   -9    2    3    5
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks alexis, this worked great. I ran both of the functions (yours and Simon's, below) and both solve the problem beautifully. I hope I can get somewhere near your level of proficiency with R, someday. – user3687834 May 29 '14 at 16:49

Here's a set of simple base commands which will generalise to any number of columns and rows:

# Your data
m <- matrix( c( 1:4 , seq(2,8,2),seq(3,12,3)),4 , byrow = F)

# Differences between columns
md <- t( apply( m , 1 , diff ) )

# Add column of NA to result to make it same size as input matrix
md <- cbind(md,NA)

# Join matrices
out <- rbind( m , md )

# Reshape to get your result
out <- matrix( c(out[ ! is.na(out) ] ) , nrow = nrow(m) , byrow = F )
#     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
#[1,]    1    1    2    1    3
#[2,]    2    2    4    2    6
#[3,]    3    3    6    3    9
#[4,]    4    4    8    4   12
share|improve this answer
1  
Wow this is awesome. I ran the demo (which worked, obviously, and clarified what each step was doing) and then tried it with one of my 336x12 matrices. Didn't work at first but then I figured out what I was doing wrong and now it's working great. Thanks so much! – user3687834 May 29 '14 at 16:46
    
@user3687834 glad both these answers helped. Please could you pick your favourite and click the green check mark next to it to indicate that your question has been answered? Great, thanks! – Simon O'Hanlon Jun 4 '14 at 8:50

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