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// Get a list of accounts in a domain separated by \x00 and ended by \x00\x00
Function GetUserList(AName: PAnsiChar; Var List; Size: Longint): Longint; StdCall;

I need to call the above from XE6.

Would someone be kind enough to post an example of how I can get this buffer, and put it to a stream or a string.

The variable "List" is supposed to fill up some buffer, which I can read off the list of users.

After trying for a couple of options, I have tried all options such as:

thanks!

var
  Buffer: array of Byte;
  iCount : Integer;
  sName : AnsiString;
begin
  ...
  SetLength(Buffer, 4096);
  iCount := GetUserListTest(PAnsiChar(sName)@Buffer[0], Length(Buffer)); // cannot
  // iCount := GetUserList(PAnsiChar(sName), Buffer, Length(Buffer));
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1  
You need to know the precise details of the contract that this function adheres to. Without that knowledge you can only guess. You'll want to read the documentation to find that our. –  David Heffernan May 29 '14 at 16:22

1 Answer 1

That is not a Win32 API function, so it must be a third-party function. Ask the vendor for an example.

A var parameter expects you to pass a variable to it. The var receives the address of the variable. @Buffer[0] does not satisfy that requirement, as @ returns a Pointer, and then the var ends up with the address of the pointer itself, not the address of the variable being pointed at. The function is expecting a pointer to a buffer. By using a var to receive that pointer, you need to drop the @ and pass the first array element, so that the address of that element (effectively the address of the buffer) will be passed to the function, eg:

iCount := GetUserList(PAnsiChar(sName), Buffer[0], iCount);

Alternatively, you can use this syntax instead, which will pass the same address of the first element:

iCount := GetUserList(PAnsiChar(sName), PByte(Buffer)^, iCount);

Now, with that said, chances are that the function may allow you to query it for the necessary array size so you can allocate only what is actually needed (but check the documentation to be sure, I'm making an assumption here since you have not said otherwise)), eg:

procedure GetDomainUsers(const Domain: AnsiString; Users: TStrings);
var
  Buffer: array of AnsiChar;
  iCount : Integer;
  User: PAnsiChar;
begin
  // this call ASSUMES the function returns the needed
  // bytecount when given a NULL/empty array - check
  // the documentation!!!
  iCount := GetUserList(PAnsiChar(Domain), PAnsiChar(nil)^, 0);
  if iCount > 0 then
  begin
    SetLength(Buffer, iCount);
    iCount := GetUserList(PAnsiChar(Domain), Buffer[0]{or: PAnsiChar(Buffer)^}, iCount);
  end;
  if iCount > 0 then
  begin
    Users.BeginUpdate;
    try
      User := PAnsiChar(Buffer);
      while User^ <> #0 do
      begin
        Users.Add(User);
        Inc(User, StrLen(User)+1);
      end;
    finally
      Users.EndUpdate;
    end;
  end;
end;

If that does not work, then you will have to pre-allocate a large array:

procedure GetDomainUsers(const Domain: AnsiString; Users: TStrings);
var
  Buffer: array of AnsiChar;
  User: PAnsiChar;
begin
  SetLength(Buffer, 1024);
  if GetUserList(PAnsiChar(Domain), Buffer[0]{or: PAnsiChar(Buffer)^}, Length(Buffer)) > 0 then
  begin
    Users.BeginUpdate;
    try
      User := PAnsiChar(Buffer);
      while User^ <> #0 do
      begin
        Users.Add(User);
        Inc(User, StrLen(User)+1);
      end;
    finally
      Users.EndUpdate;
    end;
  end;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Remy, Thanks a lot for the code sample. I realised there is indeed a GetUserCount function. No support for this API. The function GetUserList doesn't crash now, although the strings doesn't get filled yet. I'm thinking this must have something to do with the "separated by \x00 and ended by \x00\x00". I tried replacing #0 with #00 or #0#0 but the TStrings still doesn't seem to get filled. Is there a way to simply assign the array to a TStrings.Text seems there's already a separator in the array buffer returned? Or a way to read what's in the array returned? –  user3688290 May 30 '14 at 4:09
    
...continued due to limit in posting // Get total number of accounts Function GetUserCount(aName: PAnsiChar): Longint; StdCall; // Get a list of accounts separated by \x00 and ended by \x00\x00 Function GetUserList(aName: PAnsiChar; Var List; Size: Longint): Longint; StdCall; iUserCount := GetUserList(PAnsiChar(Domain), PAnsiChar(nil)^, 0); if iUserCount > 0 then begin SetLength(Buffer, iUserCount); //iCount := GetUserList(PAnsiChar(Domain), Buffer[0], iCount); iCount := GetUserList(PAnsiChar(Domain), PAnsiChar(Buffer)^, iUserCount); end; –  user3688290 May 30 '14 at 4:10
    
What value does GetUserList() actually return? Is it an error value or a success value? I assume it returns a byte count, but you have not said yet. GetUserCount() does not help you know how many bytes to allocate for the array. You cannot pass the array as-is to TStringList, you have to iterate through the array, which the code I gave you does. A null-terminated double-null-terminated format is not uncommon in API programming. You need to find out why the array is not being filled, most likely the function is failing with an error. –  Remy Lebeau May 30 '14 at 6:08
    
It returned a -3. I suppose it's -$03? Can I simply allocate a large enough bytes for array, and simply depend on the \x00 and \x00\x00 to know when to stop? If so, can you give me a code example? I'm sorry to trouble you. I tried reading up for hours, but all the ansichar stuff is confusing. :( { Function Result Codes } S_OK = $00; E_FAILURE = -$01; E_LICENSE = -$02; E_PARAMS = -$03; E_PATH = -$04; E_CONFIG = -$05; –  user3688290 May 30 '14 at 17:03
    
The function is failing with an E_PARAMS error (on which call - the first or the second? I assume the first. It probably does not like the nil). Read the documentation to find out what parameters are acceptable to it. I can't answer your question about allocating a large array, since I don't know what the function is expecting. Read the documentation. –  Remy Lebeau May 30 '14 at 17:18

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