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I have the following JSON object:

{"values": "123,456,789"}

I'd like to convert this JSON object to an instance of class Foo with the following signature, using the JSON library of the play framework:

case class Foo(value1: Double, value2: Double, value3: Double)

In the documentation about JSON combinators, there are just examples for conversions where the constructor signature of the class matches the extracted JSON values. If I had such a case, I'd have to write the following Reads function:

import play.api.libs.json._
import play.api.libs.functional.syntax._

implicit val fooReads: Reads[Foo] = (
  (JsPath \ "values").read[String]
)(Foo.apply _)

However, first I have to split the string "123,456,789"to three separate strings, and convert each of them to Double values before I can create an instance of class Foo. How can I do this with JSON combinators? I was not able to find examples for that. Trying to pass in a function literal as an argument does not work:

// this does not work
implicit val fooReads: Reads[Foo] = (
  (JsPath \ "values").read[String]
)((values: String) => {
  val Array(value1, value2, value3) = values.split(",").map(_.toDouble)
  Foo(value1, value2, value3)
})
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

The compiler is getting confused and thinks you are passing your function as the (usually implicit) parameter to the read method. You can get around this by explicitly using Reads.map instead of ApplicationOps.apply:

implicit val fooReads: Reads[Foo] = {
  (JsPath \ "values").read[String] map { values =>
    val Array(value1, value2, value3) = values.split(",").map(_.toDouble)
    Foo(value1, value2, value3)
  }
}
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