Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an array with 16 elements. I would like to evaluate these to a boolean 0 or 1 and then store this in 2 bytes so i can write to a binary file. How do I do this?

share|improve this question
    
why is this being upvoted? –  anon Mar 6 '10 at 20:04
    
@Neil, why do you ask? Probably the OP doesn't know about bitwise operations. –  Nick Dandoulakis Mar 6 '10 at 20:21
    
@Nick The idea of upvoting questions is that they should be in some sense expand the understanding of the underling language/technology. This question doesn't - simply asking a question should never be grounds for an upvote. –  anon Mar 6 '10 at 20:28
    
I upvoted this because it does just that - expand a reader's knowledge through the answers provided. Bitwise operations aren't exactly the easiest concept to get your head around (in my opinion), so I think this is an okay question to ask. Why shouldn't simply asking a question be grounds for an upvote? As long as it's a question that can help others, why not? –  IVlad Mar 6 '10 at 20:35
1  
@Neil I don't really have any plans for SO. You're making this sound like we're both running for president of SO and we have different, contradicting agendas :). If you have a vision for this site I'm sure it's better than anything I could come up with and I wish you all the best making it happen. I just thought this was a good question as, in my experience, bitwise operators aren't discussed nearly enough in classes. There's no need demonize me like that over an upvote, is there? –  IVlad Mar 6 '10 at 21:14

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Something like this you mean?

unsigned short binary = 0, i;
for ( i = 0; i < 16; ++i )
  if ( array[i] )
    binary |= 1 << i; 

// the i-th bit of binary is 1 if array[i] is true and 0 otherwise.
share|improve this answer
    
exactly like that, thanks –  Aran Mulholland Mar 7 '10 at 11:40

You have to use bitwise operators.

Here's an example:

int firstBit = 0x1;
int secondBit = 0x2;
int thirdBit = 0x4;
int fourthBit = 0x8;

int x = firstBit | fourthBit; /*both the 1st and 4th bit are set */
int isFirstBitSet = x & firstBit; /* Check if at least the first bit is set */
share|improve this answer
int values[16];
int i;
unsigned short word = 0;
unsigned short bit = 1;

for (i = 0; i < 16; i++)
{
    if (values[i])
    {
        word |= bit;
    }

    bit <<= 1;
}
share|improve this answer

This solution avoid the use of the if inside the loop:

unsigned short binary = 0, i;
for ( i = 0; i < 16; ++i )
  binary |= (array[i] != 0) << i;
share|improve this answer
    
It means that the loop shifts zeroes left and or's the result into 'binary', whereas IVlad's solution only processes set bits. It isn't clear on a majorly pipelined architecture where the benefit is, but nominally doing fewer operations for an array with many zeroes is a benefit. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 7 '10 at 2:39

Declare an array result with two bytes, then you loop through the source array:

for (int i = 0; i < 16; i++) {
  // calclurate index in result array
  int index = i >> 3;
  // shift value in result
  result[index] <<= 1;
  // check array value
  if (theArray[i]) {
    // true, so set lowest bit in result byte
    result[index]++;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why the downvote? If you don't say what it is that you don't like, it's rather pointless. –  Guffa Mar 6 '10 at 20:20
    
I didn't vote in any way, but I'm guessing it's because you use an array and you don't even mention its type. I'm guessing it's a char array, but the OP might not know that. Either way, you can do it without an array. Is there a reason you chose to use an array? –  IVlad Mar 6 '10 at 20:27
    
@IVlad: The OP specifically asked for two bytes, the logical way to store those is in an array. The data type can be anything capable of handling a byte, but a char would be an obvious choise. –  Guffa Mar 6 '10 at 20:44
    
Well, a short can also work, can't it? Anyway, +1 from me, I guess a char array does fit better :). –  IVlad Mar 6 '10 at 20:52
    
The OP specified an array of 16 elements as input/ He did not specify what type, but it does not actually matter, so long as whatever it is can be evaluated to zero or non-zero and therefore converted into a boolean. –  Clifford Mar 6 '10 at 21:14

Something like this.

int values[16];
int bits = 0;
for (int ii = 0; ii < 16; ++ii)
{
    bits |= (!!values[ii]) << ii;
}

unsigned short output = (unsigned short)bits;

the expression (!!values[ii]) forces the value to be 0 or 1, if you know for sure that the values array already contains either a 0 or a 1 and nothing else, you can leave of the !!

You could also do this if you don't like the !! syntax.

int values[16];
int bits = 0;
for (int ii = 0; ii < 16; ++ii)
{
    bits |= (values[ii] != 0) << ii;
}

unsigned short output = (unsigned short)bits;
share|improve this answer
    
What's the point of using !!? A simple if statement makes this much easier to read. And your for loop doesn't compile, by the way. –  IVlad Mar 6 '10 at 20:25
    
an if statement adds a branch in the inner loop. –  John Knoeller Mar 6 '10 at 20:28
    
Sweet. suggest a more optimal soluton and get downvoted for it! Thanks LVlad! –  John Knoeller Mar 6 '10 at 20:32
    
Really, more optimal? It's just an array of 16 elements, I doubt there's ANY platform where you could notice a difference. It's just needlessly obfuscating the code here. –  IVlad Mar 6 '10 at 20:41
    
Really a lot more optimal. Test it yourself if you don't believe me. Little functions like this tend to get used only once. OR they get used all of the time and suddenly this branch in an inner loop starts to matter. –  John Knoeller Mar 6 '10 at 20:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.