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Is there an easy way to remove comments from a C/C++ source file without doing any preprocessing. (ie, I think you can use gcc -E but this will expand macros.) I just want the source code with comments stripped, nothing else should be changed.

EDIT:

Preference towards an existing tool. I don't want to have to write this myself with regexes, I foresee too many surprises in the code.

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3  
This is actually a good exercise for using a simple lexer and parser! –  Greg Hewgill Mar 6 '10 at 20:32
36  
This is actually a good exercise for using a very complicated lexer and parser. –  anon Mar 6 '10 at 20:33
4  
@Pascal: I don't believe Dr. Dobbs, and gcc agrees: error: pasting "/" and "/" does not give a valid preprocessing token -which is expected, as comment removal happens before preprocessing –  Christoph Mar 6 '10 at 20:52
2  
@Neil:sorry, but no. A parser deals with the structure of statements. From the viewpoint of the language, a comment is a single token that does not participate in any larger structure. It's no different from a space character (in fact, in phase three of translation, each comment is to be replaced by a single space character). As for building the preprocessor into the compiler, the explanation is much simpler: the preprocessor often produces very large output, so communicating it to the compiler efficiently improves compilation speed a lot. –  Jerry Coffin Mar 6 '10 at 23:23
7  
@Neil: Perhaps that's best -- you seem to be just repeating the same assertion, with no supporting evidence. You haven't even once pointed to what semantic analysis you think is needed to parse comments correctly, just repeated that it is (which the standard not only doesn't require, but doesn't really even allow). You substitute trigraphs, splice lines, then break the source into tokens and sequences of white space (including comments). If you try to take more semantics into account than that, you're doing it wrong... –  Jerry Coffin Mar 7 '10 at 0:28

12 Answers 12

up vote 44 down vote accepted

Thanks to KennyTM for finding the right flags. Here’s the result for completeness:

test.c:

#define foo bar
foo foo foo
#ifdef foo
#undef foo
#define foo baz
#endif
foo foo
/* comments? comments. */
// c++ style comments

gcc -fpreprocessed -dD -E test.c:

#define foo bar
foo foo foo
#ifdef foo
#undef foo
#define foo baz
#endif
foo foo
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3  
I think the result Mike expects is #define foo bar\nfoo foo foo –  Pascal Cuoq Mar 6 '10 at 20:45
2  
@Pascal: Run gcc -fpreprocessed -dM -E test.c to get the #define-s as well, but they're not in the original locations. –  KennyTM Mar 6 '10 at 20:49
16  
OK, this is perfect: gcc -fpreprocessed -dD -E test.c. –  KennyTM Mar 6 '10 at 20:52
1  
I upvoted this answer, and then you had to use that dreadful word "awesome". Please don't make me downvote you. –  anon Mar 6 '10 at 21:06
5  
I added -P to the gcc options to suppress the weird line markers that sometimes show up when our start of function comments are removed. –  Dana Robinson Oct 26 '12 at 17:36

gcc -fpreprocessed -dD -E did not work for me but this program does it:

#include <stdio.h>

static void process(FILE *f)
{
 int c;
 while ( (c=getc(f)) != EOF )
 {
  if (c=='\'' || c=='"')            /* literal */
  {
   int q=c;
   do
   {
    putchar(c);
    if (c=='\\') putchar(getc(f));
    c=getc(f);
   } while (c!=q);
   putchar(c);
  }
  else if (c=='/')              /* opening comment ? */
  {
   c=getc(f);
   if (c!='*')                  /* no, recover */
   {
    putchar('/');
    ungetc(c,f);
   }
   else
   {
    int p;
    putchar(' ');               /* replace comment with space */
    do
    {
     p=c;
     c=getc(f);
    } while (c!='/' || p!='*');
   }
  }
  else
  {
   putchar(c);
  }
 }
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
 process(stdin);
 return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't handle trigraphs. –  OmnipotentEntity Jul 12 at 17:50

It depends on how perverse your comments are. I have a program scc to strip C and C++ comments. I also have a test file for it, and I tried GCC (4.2.1 on MacOS X) with the options in the currently selected answer - and GCC doesn't seem to do a perfect job on some of the horribly butchered comments in the test case.

NB: This isn't a real-life problem - people don't write such ghastly code.

Consider the (subset - 36 of 135 lines total) of the test case:

/\
*\
Regular
comment
*\
/
The regular C comment number 1 has finished.

/\
\/ This is not a C++/C99 comment!

This is followed by C++/C99 comment number 3.
/\
\
\
/ But this is a C++/C99 comment!
The C++/C99 comment number 3 has finished.

/\
\* This is not a C or C++ comment!

This is followed by regular C comment number 2.
/\
*/ This is a regular C comment *\
but this is just a routine continuation *\
and that was not the end either - but this is *\
\
/
The regular C comment number 2 has finished.

This is followed by regular C comment number 3.
/\
\
\
\
* C comment */

On my Mac, the output from GCC (gcc -fpreprocessed -dD -E subset.c) is:

/\
*\
Regular
comment
*\
/
The regular C comment number 1 has finished.

/\
\/ This is not a C++/C99 comment!

This is followed by C++/C99 comment number 3.
/\
\
\
/ But this is a C++/C99 comment!
The C++/C99 comment number 3 has finished.

/\
\* This is not a C or C++ comment!

This is followed by regular C comment number 2.
/\
*/ This is a regular C comment *\
but this is just a routine continuation *\
and that was not the end either - but this is *\
\
/
The regular C comment number 2 has finished.

This is followed by regular C comment number 3.
/\
\
\
\
* C comment */

The output from 'scc' is:

The regular C comment number 1 has finished.

/\
\/ This is not a C++/C99 comment!

This is followed by C++/C99 comment number 3.
/\
\
\
/ But this is a C++/C99 comment!
The C++/C99 comment number 3 has finished.

/\
\* This is not a C or C++ comment!

This is followed by regular C comment number 2.

The regular C comment number 2 has finished.

This is followed by regular C comment number 3.

The output from 'scc -C' (which recognizes double-slash comments) is:

The regular C comment number 1 has finished.

/\
\/ This is not a C++/C99 comment!

This is followed by C++/C99 comment number 3.

The C++/C99 comment number 3 has finished.

/\
\* This is not a C or C++ comment!

This is followed by regular C comment number 2.

The regular C comment number 2 has finished.

This is followed by regular C comment number 3.

The source for SCC is about 270 lines of code plus two supporting library files (one that I use in almost all my programs, and one that I use in filter programs). Contact me if you need it (see my profile).

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1  
Believe me Jonathan they do. I cleared the code and there was 2000 lines of code which were commented. I couldn't believe how a human being can write this messy code. –  Halil Kaskavalci Sep 25 '12 at 20:35
    
Could you publish this program and give the link here please? (if it is libre/free software) –  Totor Mar 13 '13 at 16:29
    
@Totor: It's free/libre (GPL v3 by default) software. Send me email and I'll send it (my email address is in my profile). I simply don't have anywhere that I publish code like that on a routine basis (pathetic, isn't it!). –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 13 '13 at 16:34

There is a stripcmt program than can do this:

StripCmt is a simple utility written in C to remove comments from C, C++, and Java source files. In the grand tradition of Unix text processing programs, it can function either as a FIFO (First In - First Out) filter or accept arguments on the command line.

(per hlovdal's answer to: question about Python code for this)

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The code still has some bugs. For example, it cannot handle code like int /* comment // */ main(). –  whjm Jul 16 at 2:51
    
and have bugs when handling comments like // comment out next line \ –  billybob Sep 4 at 15:53

This is a perl script to remove //one-line and /* multi-line */ comments

  #!/usr/bin/perl

  undef $/;
  $text = <>;

  $text =~ s/\/\/[^\n\r]*(\n\r)?//g;
  $text =~ s/\/\*+([^*]|\*(?!\/))*\*+\///g;

  print $text;

It requires your source file as a command line argument. Save the script to a file, let say remove_comments.pl and call it using the following command: perl -w remove_comments.pl [your source file]

Hope it will be helpful

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does not seem to handle strings containing "/*" or "//", etc. down the rabbit hole. –  akavel Jan 3 '13 at 12:00

I Believe If you use one statement you can easily remove Comments from C

perl -i -pe ‘s/\\\*(.*)/g’ file.c This command Use for removing * C style comments 
perl -i -pe 's/\\\\(.*)/g' file.cpp This command Use for removing \ C++ Style Comments

Only Problem with this command it cant remove comments that contains more than one line.but by using this regEx you can easily implement logic for Multiline Removing comments

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I had this problem as well. I found this tool (Cpp-Decomment) , which worked for me. However it ignores if the comment line extends to next line. Eg:

// this is my comment \
comment continues ...

In this case, I couldn't find a way in the program so just searched for ignored lines and fixed in manually. I believe there would be an option for that or maybe you could change the program's source file to do so.

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See this answer here on SO for a similar question posted on a previous occasion...

Hope this helps, Best regards, Tom.

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7  
I've been restraining myself from saying this for a while but ... have you noticed that is not the norm to add an irritating sig to your answers here? –  anon Mar 6 '10 at 21:01
6  
Neil, I agree. Yours forever, Mike –  Mike Mar 6 '10 at 21:07
    
@Neil: OMG!!! will remove it from future postings....thanks....no one told me until now... –  t0mm13b Mar 6 '10 at 21:46
    
Thanks in advance for that. –  Roger Pate Mar 6 '10 at 21:58
#include<stdio.h>
{        
        char c;
        char tmp = '\0';
        int inside_comment = 0;  // A flag to check whether we are inside comment
        while((c = getchar()) != EOF) {
                if(tmp) {
                        if(c == '/') {
                                while((c = getchar()) !='\n');
                                tmp = '\0';
                                putchar('\n');
                                continue;
                        }else if(c == '*') {
                                inside_comment = 1;
                                while(inside_comment) {
                                        while((c = getchar()) != '*');
                                        c = getchar();
                                        if(c == '/'){
                                                tmp = '\0';
                                                inside_comment = 0;
                                        }
                                }
                                continue;
                        }else {
                                putchar(c);
                                tmp = '\0';
                                continue;
                        }
                }
                if(c == '/') {
                        tmp = c;
                } else {
                        putchar(c);
                }
        }
        return 0;
}

This program runs for both the conditions i.e // and /...../

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Comments like /*..*/ and //.....can be removed –  Vivek Patel Jul 2 '13 at 11:07
    
Several problems. 1. You're missing int main(void). 2. It doesn't handle comment delimiters inside string literals and character constants. 3. It deletes single / character (try running it on its own source code). –  Keith Thompson Aug 19 '13 at 20:41

Recently I wrote some Ruby code to solve this problem. I have considered following exceptions:

  • comment in strings
  • multiple line comment on one line, fix greedy match.
  • multiple lines on multiple lines

Here is the code:Github, Remove comments

It uses following code to preprocess each line in case those comments appear in strings. If it appears in your code, uh, bad luck. You can replace it with a more complex strings.

  • MUL_REPLACE_LEFT = "MUL_REPLACE_LEFT"
  • MUL_REPLACE_RIGHT = "MUL_REPLACE_RIGHT"
  • SIG_REPLACE = "SIG_REPLACE"

Usage: ruby -w inputfile outputfile

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i know its late, but i thought i'd share my code and my first attempt at writing a compiler.

note: this does not account for "*/" inside a multiline comment e.g /*...."*/"...*/

then again, gcc 4.8.1 doesnt either

void function_removeComments(char *pchar_sourceFile, long long_sourceFileSize)
{
    long long_sourceFileIndex = 0;
    long long_logIndex = 0;

    int int_EOF = 0;

    for (long_sourceFileIndex=0; long_sourceFileIndex < long_sourceFileSize;long_sourceFileIndex++)
    {
        if (pchar_sourceFile[long_sourceFileIndex] == '/' && int_EOF == 0)
        {
            long_logIndex = long_sourceFileIndex;  // log "possible" start of comment

            if (long_sourceFileIndex+1 < long_sourceFileSize)  // array bounds check given we want to peek at the next character
            {
                if (pchar_sourceFile[long_sourceFileIndex+1] == '*') // multiline comment
                {
                    for (long_sourceFileIndex+=2;long_sourceFileIndex < long_sourceFileSize; long_sourceFileIndex++)
                    {
                        if (pchar_sourceFile[long_sourceFileIndex] == '*' && pchar_sourceFile[long_sourceFileIndex+1] == '/')
                        {
                            // since we've found the end of multiline comment
                            // we want to increment the pointer position two characters
                            // accounting for "*" and "/"
                            long_sourceFileIndex+=2;  

                            break;  // terminating sequence found
                        }
                    }

                    // didn't find terminating sequence so it must be eof.
                    // set file pointer position to initial comment start position
                    // so we can display file contents.
                    if (long_sourceFileIndex >= long_sourceFileSize)
                    {
                        long_sourceFileIndex = long_logIndex;

                        int_EOF = 1;
                    }
                }
                else if (pchar_sourceFile[long_sourceFileIndex+1] == '/')  // single line comment
                {
                    // since we know its a single line comment, increment file pointer
                    // until we encounter a new line or its the eof 
                    for (long_sourceFileIndex++; pchar_sourceFile[long_sourceFileIndex] != '\n' && pchar_sourceFile[long_sourceFileIndex] != '\0'; long_sourceFileIndex++);
                }
            }
        }

        printf("%c",pchar_sourceFile[long_sourceFileIndex]);
     }
 }
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I wrote a simple C program by defining an FSM (finite state machine). It works fine with Jonathan Leffler's test case (see the scc -C output).

The code is as follows:

/*
 * Author: Clark Wang <dearvoid at gmail.com>
 *
 * Note:
 *   - The code would consider `//' in `#include <foo//bar.h>' as
 *     the start of a comment.
 */

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

#define EXIT_OK           0
#define EXIT_USAGE_ERROR  1
#define EXIT_IO_ERROR     2
#define EXIT_BAD_SYNTAX   3

typedef enum {
    FSM_NORMAL = 0,      //           (normal)
    FSM_IN_QUOTES,       // "string   (literal string)
    FSM_ESCAPE_NEXT,     // "string\  (`\' in string literal)
    FSM_FIRST_SLASH,     // '/'       (seen `/')
    FSM_IN_C_CMNT,       //           (in C style comment)
    FSM_STAR_IN_C_CMNT,  //           (`*' in C style comment)
    FSM_IN_CPP_CMNT,     //           (in C++ style comment)
    FSM_ESC_AFTER_SLASH, // /\        (`/' followed by `\')
    FSM_ESC_AFTER_STAR,  // /*...*\   (`*\' in C style comment)
    FSM_ESC_IN_CPP_CMNT, // //...\    (`\' in C++ style comment)
} fsm_state_t;

static char * g_progname;

void
usage(int exitcode)
{
    printf("Usage:\n"
           "  %s [FILE]\n"
           "\n"
           "Note:\n"
           "  If FILE is not specified, stdin will be used.\n"
           , g_progname);

    exit(exitcode);
}

int
main(int argc, char * argv[])
{
    int i, nRead;
    int fd;
    int esc_newlines = 0;
    char buf[4096], next;
    fsm_state_t state = FSM_NORMAL;

    if ((g_progname = strrchr(argv[0], '/')) != NULL) {
        ++g_progname;
    } else {
        g_progname = argv[0];
    }
    --argc, ++argv;

    if (argc > 1) {
        usage(EXIT_USAGE_ERROR);
    } else if (argc == 0) {
        fd = fileno(stdin);
    } else if (strcmp(argv[0], "-h") == 0) {
        usage(EXIT_OK);
    } else {
        fd = open(argv[0], O_RDONLY);
        if (fd < 0) {
            perror("open");
            exit(EXIT_IO_ERROR);
        }
    }

    while (1) {
        nRead = read(fd, buf, sizeof(buf));
        if (nRead < 0) {
            perror("read");
            exit(EXIT_IO_ERROR);
        } else if (0 == nRead) {
            if (state != FSM_NORMAL) {
                fprintf(stderr, "WARNING: code syntax error?\n");
                exit(EXIT_BAD_SYNTAX);
            }

            break;
        }

        for (i = 0; i < nRead; ++i) {
            next = buf[i];
            switch (state) {
                case FSM_NORMAL:
                    if ('"' == next) {
                        state = FSM_IN_QUOTES;
                        printf("%c", next);
                    } else if ('/' == next) {
                        state = FSM_FIRST_SLASH;
                        esc_newlines = 0;
                    } else {
                        printf("%c", next);
                    }
                    break;

                case FSM_IN_QUOTES:
                    if ('\\' == next) {
                        state = FSM_ESCAPE_NEXT;
                    } else if ('"' == next) {
                        state = FSM_NORMAL;
                    } else {
                        /* still in quotes */
                    }
                    printf("%c", next);
                    break;

                case FSM_ESCAPE_NEXT:
                    state = FSM_IN_QUOTES;
                    printf("%c", next);
                    break;

                case FSM_FIRST_SLASH:
                    if ('/' == next) {
                        state = FSM_IN_CPP_CMNT;
                        esc_newlines = 0;
                    } else if ('*' == next) {
                        state = FSM_IN_C_CMNT;
                        esc_newlines = 0;
                    } else if ('\\' == next) {
                        state = FSM_ESC_AFTER_SLASH;
                    } else {
                        state = FSM_NORMAL;
                        printf("/");
                        for ( ; esc_newlines > 0; --esc_newlines) {
                            printf("\\\n");
                        }
                        printf("%c", next);
                    }
                    break;

                case FSM_IN_C_CMNT:
                    if ('*' == next) {
                        state = FSM_STAR_IN_C_CMNT;
                    } else {
                        /* comment continues */
                    }
                    break;

                case FSM_STAR_IN_C_CMNT:
                    if ('*' == next) {
                        /* still FSM_STAR_IN_C_CMNT */
                    } else if ('/' == next) {
                        state = FSM_NORMAL;
                    } else if ('\\' == next) {
                        state = FSM_ESC_AFTER_STAR;
                    } else {
                        state = FSM_IN_C_CMNT;
                    }
                    break;

                case FSM_IN_CPP_CMNT:
                    if ('\n' == next) {
                        state = FSM_NORMAL;
                        printf("%c", next);
                    } else if ('\\' == next) {
                        state = FSM_ESC_IN_CPP_CMNT;
                    } else {
                        /* comment continues */
                    }
                    break;
                case FSM_ESC_AFTER_SLASH:
                    if ('\n' == next) {
                        state = FSM_FIRST_SLASH;
                        /* until now we are not sure if this
                         * `\<newline>' would be part of a comment */
                        ++esc_newlines;
                    } else if ('/' == next) {
                        state = FSM_FIRST_SLASH;
                        printf("/");
                        for ( ; esc_newlines > 0; --esc_newlines) {
                            printf("\\\n");
                        }
                        printf("\\");
                    } else {
                        state = FSM_NORMAL;
                        printf("/");
                        for ( ; esc_newlines > 0; --esc_newlines) {
                            printf("\\\n");
                        }
                        printf("\\%c", next);
                    }
                    break;

                case FSM_ESC_AFTER_STAR:
                    if ('\n' == next) {
                        state = FSM_STAR_IN_C_CMNT;
                    } else if ('*' == next) {
                        state = FSM_STAR_IN_C_CMNT;
                    } else {
                        state = FSM_IN_C_CMNT;
                    }
                    break;

                case FSM_ESC_IN_CPP_CMNT:
                    if ('\n' == next) {
                        state = FSM_IN_CPP_CMNT;
                    } else {
                        state = FSM_IN_CPP_CMNT;
                    }
                    break;
            }
        }
    }

    exit(EXIT_OK);
}
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