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I have a txt file which contains:

Some random
text here. This file
has multiple lines. Should be one line.

I use:

sed '{:q;N;s/\n/:sl:/g;t q}' file1.txt > singleline.txt

and get:

Some random:sl:text here. This file:sl:has multiple lines. Should be one line.

Now I want to replace the :sl: pattern with newline (\n) character. When I use:

sed 's/:sl:/&\n/g' singleline.txt

I get:

Some random:sl:
text here. This file:sl:
has multiple lines. Should be one line.

How to replace the pattern with newline character instead of adding newline character after the pattern?

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:sl: pattern means? –  Avinash Raj May 29 at 18:40
    
sed 's/:sl:/\n/g' singleline.txt –  Avinash Raj May 29 at 18:41
    
@AvinashRaj :sl: means "single line". Can be anything else as well. –  Rlearner May 29 at 18:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Sed uses & as a shortcut for the matched pattern. So you are replacing :s1: with :s1:\n.

Change your sed command like this:

sed 's/:sl:/\n/g' singleline.txt
share|improve this answer

You can do it more easily with tr : tr '\n' ' ' < singleline.txt

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