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I am a newbie of c++. I am using c++11 standards and Mingw64 to understand nested struct.

But I am not able to figure out what is wrong with the following program. I am trying to use nested struct using pointers. I do not want to use "new" keywords to do this. Also, I would like to understand am I leaking memory in this program.

#include<iostream>
struct model{
  int a;
  double b;
  struct shape {
      int c ;
      double d;
  };
  shape  *pshape;

};

int main(){
  model *m ;
  m->a = 2;
  m->pshape->c=3;
  delete m;
  printf("done\n");
}

Please help me in understanding where I am wrong and what is the best and clean way of using nested struct with c++11.

In above program will pointer "pshape" destroyed when program goes out of scope ?

regards, Avi


Thank you for your comments. I am learning more from you guys than I would learn from a book. Your comments are very informative as well as humorous. Thank you guys.

Based on your suggestion here is my another attempt. Please let me know if this you think has flaws:

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

struct model{
  int a;
  double b;
  struct shape {
      int c ;
      double d;

  } *pshape =NULL;
  shape sh;

};

int main(){

  model m;
  model *pm;
  pm = &m;
  pm->pshape=&pm->sh;

  pm->a = 4;
  pm->b = 3.24;
  pm->pshape->c=101;



  cout << pm->a << endl;
  cout << pm->pshape->c << endl;
  cout << pm->pshape->d << endl;

  printf("done\n");
}
share|improve this question
2  
Your program is broken, because you have pointers that don't point to valid objects. Yet you treat them as if they did. Bearing that in mind, most of what you ask is irrelevant. –  juanchopanza May 29 at 22:00
    
"I do not want to use the new keyword to do this". What? Why? How to you want to allocate memory? On the heap using malloc? On the stack? –  clcto May 30 at 0:23
    
You can learn about the difference between pointers and values, and the need to balance new and delete, in any basic tutorial on C++. Work through the tutorial and understand the principles. And don't call delete on something that hasn't been allocated with new! –  orpheist May 30 at 0:53
    
I am trying to avoid heap allocation that's why I am refraining from new keyword. Thank you juanchopanza for your response I found the mistake. And I learned that pointer can not be deleted if it's the stack. delete should only be used with new operator. –  user1453817 May 30 at 1:16

2 Answers 2

Here is how I had it working

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
struct model{
  int a;
  double b;
  struct shape {
      int c ;
      double d;
  }*pshape;

};

int main(){
  model m;
  model *pm;
  pm = &m;
  pm->a = 2;
  pm->pshape->c=3;
  printf("done\n");
}
share|improve this answer

No you didn't. pm->pshape->c=3; just overwrites a random, unallocated memory fragment since pshape doesn't point anywhere known. If you really want to avoid dynamic allocation, then drop the pointers altogether :

#include<iostream>

using namespace std;

struct Model{
  int a;
  double b;
  struct Shape {
      int c ;
      double d;
  } shape;

};

int main(){
  Model m;
  m.a = 2;
  m.shape.c=3;
  printf("done\n");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your response. So you are saying that pointers cannot be used if I do not want dynamic allocation. But the corrected code I wrote works as expected. Please let me know why you said pshape is not pointing to anywhere known –  user1453817 May 30 at 10:53
1  
In your answer, nowhere do you assign m.pshape. Thus it contains "garbage", i.e whatever happened to be in memory where it sat. By mere luck, that garbage could be interpreted as an address inside your program's memory segment, so writing to it is no illegal operation as far as the OS is concerned (otherwise a segfault would have killed your program before it begun stomping other programs' memory). Nonetheless, that memory write is made at random, and can either do nothing special (if nothing useful happened to be there before), crash instantly, or corrupt some vital part of your [...] –  Quentin May 30 at 11:32
1  
[...] program and make it crash way later. And you'd sure be glad if it crashed instantly, because both the others outcomes are a PITA to debug. Now, pointers are no plague to avoid, if you use them carefully, and they are by no means constrained to dynamic allocation schemes. Pointers just point at something, do with them as you please. The rule of thumb is, in all cases and whatever your use of them is, to always initialize them. If they can't point to anything meaningful (because the pointee doesn't exist yet for instance), then initialize them with NULL. [...] –  Quentin May 30 at 11:33
1  
[...] Your program is then guaranteed to crash on the spot if you accidentally dereference one, instead of scattering time bombs in your memory. (These comments lack space :<) –  Quentin May 30 at 11:33

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