Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a web solution that looks like this:

Domain (solution folder)

    Artemis.Core (project in solution)
        Interfaces (project folder)
            IRepository.cs
        Address.cs
        ...
        User.cs

    Artemis.Data (project in solution)
        Repository.cs

Artemis.User (project in solution)
    IUserOrderTask.cs
    IUserProfileTask.cs
      ...

Artemis.Tasks.User (project in solution)
    UserOrderTask.cs
    UserProfileTask.cs
    ...

Artemis.WebSite (project in solution)
   Controllers (project folder)
   Models (project folder)
   Views (project folder)
   ...

There's a lot of other projects and files in this solution. It's a complex web of dependencies that I've been asked to reduce. Here are the dependencies of each project, ordered by amount:

Artemis.WebSite depends on:

  • Artemis.Core
  • Artemis.Data
  • Artemis.User
  • Artemis.Tasks.User

Artemis.Tasks.User depends on:

  • Artemis.Core
  • Artemis.User

Artemis.User and Artemis.Data depend on:

  • Artemis.Core

Finally Artemis.Core depends on nothing.

My task is to remove everything from the solution that Artemis.WebSite doesn't explicitly depend on. Most of these projects are used in several solutions for other web sites, so removing all the stuff from Artemis.Core except User.cs (for instance) is not an option.

How can I do this without modifying the projects?

share|improve this question
    
want a simple answer? you can't if you aren't going to remove/duplicate code. There's no way to remove dependencies. Only way to do, but is really dirty, create just one project, add all code to it, and now you only have one dependecy –  Gusman May 29 at 21:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can add specific CS files as links to projects, which would bring in a class without touching the original project, or copy the file.

  1. Right-click target project
  2. Select Add Existing Item...
  3. Select CS file you want to "add".
  4. DO NOT CLICK ADD
  5. Click drop down arrow next to Add and select Add as Link.
share|improve this answer
    
Is there any downside to using linked files this way? –  Koveras May 29 at 22:14
    
Not as long as all your developers understand what linked files are (so they don't change them and break some other project without knowing it). As far as your project goes, it doesn't care if its a local file or a linked file. It compiles exactly the same way. –  Nathan A May 29 at 22:16
    
Well this is weird. I added User.cs as a linked file to Artemis.User, but not to Artemis.Tasks.User (which also references it). I thought I would have to add it as a linked file to both but apparently not. –  Koveras May 29 at 22:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.