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The master-detail scenario. Been around forever. OK, if not forever, at least I was doing master-detail with FORTRAN on punch cards in the 70's. It's still around - plenty of master-detail questions here on STO.

I looked for a good way to do a master-detail recognizer in F#, didn't find it. Apologies if I missed it, and if so, can someone just reply with the sto thread or url? thanks

Here's my F#-newbie take on doing a master-detail recognizer in F#. That is: Reducing a raw/flat list of master-detail strings to a list of F#-records, where the master-strings are paired with their detail string-list.

Not looking for code golf here folks. Elegance. I had hoped to end up with something elegant, but the below is just a straight-forward recursive list walk. My F#-newbie brain failed to see how to make good use here of folds, comprehensions, fold-backs, maps, active patterns, computation expressions, etc.

Let's keep it to what can be done in F#. If there is a pre-built flat-file master-detail XML-data loader in .Net that makes master-detail .txt files into .Net XML in a one-line .Net call, that's quite interesting because it can be used in F#.

As someone with a long imperative programming history, I was trying to stick to immutable F# for practice. But if dipping into imperative or mutable code is really the best way for this in F#, please explain away. The output could be a list of tuples, a sequence of records, an array of tuples, etc.

Any comments/feedback.... thanks

let testInput =
    ["master Homer"    ; "Doh.."; "Doh!!" ;
     "master Has none" ;
     "master JoyJoyJoy"; "Yaa!" ; "Yaa!!!"; "Yaa!!!!!!"]

type md = {m: string; d: string list}
            member x.addDetail newd = {m = x.m; d = x.d @ [newd]}
            static member  noMaster = {m = "" ; d =           []}  // master records can never be null-strings, so "" works here
            static member  isMaster (L:string) = L.StartsWith("master ")
            static member  isDetail (L:string) = not (md.isMaster L) // There is no third kind of record - if not a master then it is a detail

let rec masterDetails flatList currentMaster =
    if           md.noMaster = currentMaster then
        match flatList with
        | []     -> [] // If no master and no more input: input list was empty and the empty list is the overall result
        | h :: t -> if md.isMaster h then // If no master, then head becomes the first master of the run
                                          masterDetails t {m = h; d = []}
                    else
                        failwith "Bad input: First record must be a master record"
    else
        match flatList with
        | []     ->     [currentMaster]   // End of input; return current master as a one-entry-list
        | h :: t -> if md.isMaster h then // Head will now replace the current master as the new master
                        [currentMaster] @ masterDetails t {m = h; d = []}
                    else                  // Keep current master; and add detail record to current master's detail list
                                          masterDetails t (currentMaster.addDetail h)

let testSolution = // Required: 1) Preserve order of the master sets. 2) Preserve sort order of details-within-masters.
    [{m = "master Homer"    ; d = ["Doh.."; "Doh!!"             ]}; 
     {m = "master Has none" ; d = [                             ]};
     {m = "master JoyJoyJoy"; d = ["Yaa!"; "Yaa!!!"; "Yaa!!!!!!"]} ]

let            tryIt = masterDetails testInput md.noMaster
let testTry = (tryIt = testSolution)
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3 Answers 3

This sounds like a job for takeDrop.

// split a list into a prefix of elements that all 
// meet predicate 'p', and the suffix remainder
let takeDrop p l =
    let rec loop acc l =
        match l with
        | h::t when p h -> loop (h::acc) t
        | _ -> List.rev acc, l
    loop [] l

let rec masterDetail input =
    [match input with
     | [] -> ()
     | h::t ->
        assert(md.isMaster h)
        let det, rest = takeDrop (not << md.isMaster) t
        yield { m = h; d = det }
        yield! masterDetail rest]

Full test code below.

let testInput = 
    ["master Homer"    ; "Doh.."; "Doh!!" ; 
     "master Has none" ; 
     "master JoyJoyJoy"; "Yaa!" ; "Yaa!!!"; "Yaa!!!!!!"] 

type md = {m: string; d: string list} 
            static member  isMaster (s:string) = s.StartsWith("master ") 

let testSolution = // Required: 1) Preserve order of the master sets. 
                   // 2) Preserve sort order of details-within-masters. 
    [{m = "master Homer"    ; d = ["Doh.."; "Doh!!"             ]};  
     {m = "master Has none" ; d = [                             ]}; 
     {m = "master JoyJoyJoy"; d = ["Yaa!"; "Yaa!!!"; "Yaa!!!!!!"]} ] 

// split a list into a prefix of elements that all 
// meet predicate 'p', and the suffix remainder
let takeDrop p l =
    let rec loop acc l =
        match l with
        | h::t when p h -> loop (h::acc) t
        | _ -> List.rev acc, l
    loop [] l

let rec masterDetail input =
    [match input with
     | [] -> ()
     | h::t ->
        assert(md.isMaster h)
        let det, rest = takeDrop (not << md.isMaster) t
        yield { m = h; d = det }
        yield! masterDetail rest]

let briSol = masterDetail testInput
printfn "%A" (briSol = testSolution)
share|improve this answer
    
+1, Nice separation of concerns. –  gradbot Mar 7 '10 at 16:55

As far as I know, there is no built-in function that would automatically split a list in this fashion. In the real-world, you would probably use a different representation of the data in the first place, so you wouldn't need to solve this problem (when loading data from XML, you'd already have hierarchical structure and when grouping data using LINQ, you'd also get hierarchical data). However, your function may still be needed, for example when loading data from a text-file.

Here is a slightly simpler version that uses sequence expression to generate the outer collection (of master-details records). The inner collection is accumulated in a parameter in the usual way:

let rec groupMasterDetails l acc master = seq {
  match l with 
  // No master found yet, if the first element isn't master, we throw
  | x::xs when not (md.isMaster x) && master = None ->
    failwith "The first element must be master"
  // Starting a new group, yield the previous group
  | x::xs when md.isMaster x ->
    if master <> None then yield { m = master.Value; d = List.rev acc }
    yield! groupMasterDetails xs [] (Some x)
  // Continue the current group
  | x:: xs ->
    yield! groupMasterDetails xs (x::acc) master
  // End of processing, yield the last group
  | [] -> 
    if master <> None then yield { m = master.Value; d = List.rev acc } }

let masterDetails l = l [] None

Note that the elements are accumulated in the reversed order (as opposed to using [el]@rest and then reversed, because this is a lot more efficient - using @ involves copying of the entire list, so it is a bad practice to use it often). This also means that the implementation doesn't need your addDetail member.

However, this is still relatively long piece of code - I'm interested to see if this can be implemented by composing standard F# functions (I didn't find any good way to do this).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Tomas. Yes, I did not like the two @'s I had in my post. I think your version is better than slightly simpler: you ripped out the two @'s, ripped out the outer if-then, merged two match's into one match. Added comprehension/yield/yield! and some when guards. Instead of about 6 code paths to think about in mine, there are about 4 in yours. I like yours a lot better. Many thanks for the reply. And yes, it is .txt files I was thinking about. Did an export on an old photo album program to move the data to the newer Photoshop Elements. Voila, one txt file of master-detail data per folder. –  brucer10 Mar 7 '10 at 4:32

Here's an example, building off of Brain's answer, that takes separation too far however it does show the power of functional programming.

let takeDrop p l =
    let rec loop acc l =
        match l with
        | h::t when p h -> loop (h::acc) t
        | _ -> List.rev acc, l
    loop [] l

let rec listSplit spliter neo l =
    [match l with
     | [] -> ()
     | h::t ->
        let det, rest = spliter t
        yield neo h det
        yield! listSplit spliter neo rest]

let masterDetail = 
    listSplit 
        (takeDrop (not << md.isMaster)) 
        (fun h det -> { m = h; d = det }) 
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