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Updated my Code which now gives me an error at S.push_back(qElem(str));

I am trying to create a += operator in order to push a string into my stack but I am having the most difficult time at succeeding. I keep receiving errors. For example, from my code below I am receiving an error within main.cpp at (FIXED):

sta += "Clean";  //ERROR STATES: No viable overloaded '+='

Then with different code at different times I will receive an error at (FIXED):

S.push_back(qElem(str)); //ERROR STATES: No matching conversion for functional-style cast from 'std::__1::basic_string<char>' to 'qElem'

I am just having a really hard time with the operator, any help on how to make this work would be greatly appreciated.

main.cpp

#include "queue.h"
#include "stack.h"

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>


using namespace std;

int main()
{
    string more;
    string task;
    int priority;
    string yes;

    int stack;

    PriQueue<string> que;
    Stack<string> sta;

    do { //Do while loop, to enter more tasks

        cout << "Would you like to add to the stack or the priority queue (1/2)?" << endl;
        cout << "1. Stack" << endl; cout << "2. Priority Queue" << endl;
        cin >> stack;

        if (stack == 1) {
            sta += "Clean";
            sta.peek();

        }

        else
        {
            //Taking in the task
            cout << "What is your task in ONE word?" << endl;
            cin >> task;

            cout << "What is the priority level of the task on a scale from 1 to 10 (10 = highest priority)?" << endl;
            cin >> priority;
            //Taking in the priority
            if (priority > 10 || priority < 1) {
                priority = 5;
                cout << "Invalid Priority Level, Automatically set to 5." << endl;
            }

            que.enqueue(task, priority); //Taking and storing the task

        }

        cout << "Would you like to RUN this again (y/n)?" << endl;
        cin >> more;

    } while (more == "y" || more == "Y" || more == "Yes" || more == "yes"); //End of loop response

    que.size(); //Returning your the number of tasks you have

    que.peek(); //Returning your first task

    cout << "Would you like us to delete your first task (y/n)?" << endl; //Using "dequeue" for example
    cin >> yes;
    if (yes == "y" || yes == "Y" || yes == "Yes" || yes == "yes") {

        que.dequeue(); //Deleting your first task

        que.peek(); //Returning your NEW first task
    }

    else {cout << "Thank You, Goodbye" << endl;}


    return 0;
}

stack.h

#ifndef Queue_stack_h
#define Queue_stack_h

#include "queue.h"
#include "error.h"

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

template<class T>
class Stack : private vector<qElem>
{
    vector<qElem> S;

public:
    Stack<T> push(T str);
    void pop();
    void peek();

    Stack<T> operator += (const T& str);

    Stack<T> operator -= (string const &str);


};


template<class T>
Stack<T> Stack<T>::push(T str)
{
    S.push_back(qElem(str));

}

template<class T>
void Stack<T>::pop()
{
    if (S.empty()) {  //First check if stack is empty, if not, print out frist in stack
        cout << "You have none in stack!" << endl;
    }

    else {
        cout << "FIRST IN STACK: " << S.front() << endl;
    }


    S.erase(S.begin()); //Now erase first in stack

    if (S.empty()) {
        cout << "You have NONE in STACK!" << endl;
    }

    else {

    }

}

template<class T>
void Stack<T>::peek()
{
    if (S.empty()) {  //First check if stack is empty, if not, print out frist in stack
        cout << "You have no stack!" << endl;
    }

    else {
        cout << "FIRST IN STACK: " << &S.front() << endl;
    }

}

template<class T>
Stack<T> Stack<T>::operator += (const T& str)
{
    this->push(str);
    return *this;

}

template<class T>
Stack<T> Stack<T>::operator -= (string const &str)
{


}

#endif
share|improve this question
3  
Is all of this code 100% necessary for demonstrating your problem? –  chris May 30 '14 at 3:02
    
@chris I believe so, I thought it was good to show my code for others to further understand my error. –  user260739 May 30 '14 at 3:03
    
Sure it is, but pop and peek and operator-= aren't used by operator+=. The main program uses much more than operator+=, but if the problem is with operator+=, the main program could be about as simple as Stack<int> s; s += 5; –  chris May 30 '14 at 3:06
    
@chris Yes, the problem is only with operator+=, I can't seem to get it to successfully take in the string and push it into my vector, I am trying to use the += instead of using sta.push("Clean") –  user260739 May 30 '14 at 3:10
    
Based on your vague error description, this minimal example should produce the same error. The point is, it's a lot less code to read through and demonstrates the problem just as well. –  chris May 30 '14 at 3:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

From Effective C++ by Scott Meyers:

Item 10

Have assignment operators return a reference to *this

In keeping with this convention, your overload should look something like this:

Stack<T>& operator+=(const Stack<T>& rhs)
{
    ...
    return *this;
}

That said, it looks like you're trying to add a string to your Stack, so your overload becomes this (which seems non-conventional):

Stack<T>& operator+=(const T& rhs)
{
    this->push(rhs);
    return *this;
}

I say this is unconventional because you'd normally expect the += operator to add two like objects together.

share|improve this answer

For this to work you must:

  • Specify a T as a parameter of += so the compiler finds the appropriate operator
  • Return a reference, not a copy of the Stack.

Example:

Stack<T>& operator+=(const T& obj)
{
  this->push(obj);
  return *this;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Needs to be ... +=(const T& value) ... –  bstar55 May 30 '14 at 3:29
    
Already fixed but thanks –  quantdev May 30 '14 at 3:29
    
@bstar55 Both your answers solved my error but I had my second error pop up again at S.push_back(qElem(str)); which states: No matching conversion for functional-style cast from 'std::__1::basic_string<char>' to 'qElem' –  user260739 May 30 '14 at 3:40
    
What is qElem? I'm guessing you should be inheriting from vector< T> and doing S.push_back(str); –  bstar55 May 30 '14 at 3:45
    
@user260739 this "new" problem is with the expression qElem(str), not with your stack. qElem does not have a constructor that accepts str. –  Matt McNabb May 30 '14 at 3:47

Here you are an example function of how you overload +=

// string::operator+=
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int main ()
{
  std::string name ("John");
  std::string family ("Smith");
  name += " K. ";         // c-string
  name += family;         // string
  name += '\n';           // character

  std::cout << name;
  return 0;
}

Output: John K. Smith Thats the most common example, in which everything should work. Note the std::string usage.

share|improve this answer
2  
There's not even any += in here. –  chris May 30 '14 at 3:13
    
It doesn't matter the point is the same. But anyway, i fixed it for you. Appologize if you couldn't understand what you needed the first time. –  Lively May 30 '14 at 3:20
    
This is using +=, not overloading it. –  Matt McNabb May 30 '14 at 3:42
    
Well.. yeah. Didn't said it is. –  Lively May 30 '14 at 3:46

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