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In my ARC app for iOS 7.1, I have a singleton class that has a NSMutableDictionary (property is nonatomic, retain) where the key is a string and the value is a NSMutableArray. The class sets this dictionary in a callback from a NSOperation subclass. Everything seems to work fine until some time later (could be several minutes or several hours), the objects in the NSMutableDictionary are gone. Usually the app was in the background and brought to the foreground but it's been nearly impossible to find a reproducible test case. The problem, however, happens all the time.

How can I go about debugging this? I've seen tools for finding leaks but nothing to detect a premature release.

CODE:

@interface MyManager : NSObject

@property (nonatomic, retain) NSOperationQueue * queue;
@property (nonatomic, retain) NSMutableDictionary * allObjectsByCategory;
@property (nonatomic, retain) NSMutableDictionary * allObjectsByName;

+ (MyManager *)default;
- (void)loadWithCompletion:(void (^)(BOOL succeeded))aBlock;

@end

@implementation MyManager

@synthesize queue, allObjectsByCategory, allObjectsByName;

- (void)loadWithCompletion:(void (^)(BOOL succeeded))aBlock {
    self.queue = [[NSOperationQueue alloc] init];
    MyFetchObjectsOperation * op = [[MyFetchObjectsOperation alloc] init];
    op.successBlock = ^(NSMutableDictionary * allByCategory, NSMutableDictionary * allByName) {
        self.allObjectsByCategory = allByCategory;
        self.allObjectsByName = allByName;
        aBlock(YES);
    };

    op.failureBlock = ^(NSError * err) {
        aBlock(NO);
    };

    [self.queue addOperation:op];
}

@end
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7  
If the application is backgrounded for long enough, the OS will just kill it off and you'll start from scratch if you aren't persisting anything. –  CodaFi May 30 at 4:34
1  
Does it happen even if the app is never sent to the background? –  CrimsonChris May 30 at 4:36
    
some code would be helpful to identify the cause. usually when low memory warning is issued. we clear the views but persist the data... –  nsuinteger May 30 at 5:34
    
It looks like a concurrency/race-condition bug. It'd help you post some code. –  3329 May 30 at 16:48
    
I believe it happens even if the app is NOT sent to the background. I'd have to retest this to confirm which is time consuming because it's not easily reproduced (but frequently happens.) –  user3246173 Jun 1 at 0:55

4 Answers 4

I feel enabling Zombies will be the best way to debug this and identify the reason behind premature release of the object. Here's what zombie object does (quoting from apple docs):

"Replace deallocated objects with a “zombie” object that traps any attempt to use it. When you send a message to a zombie object, the runtime logs an error and crashes. You can look at the backtrace to see the chain of calls that triggered the zombie detector."

To enable Zombies, Press CMD+Shift+,(comma) then go to diagnostics tab and tick "Enable Zombie Objects"

Click here for a Screenshot.

Hope this helps!

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You have to give memory allocation from your class

- (void)loadWithCompletion:(void (^)(BOOL succeeded))aBlock {
    self.queue = [[NSOperationQueue alloc] init];
    MyFetchObjectsOperation * op = [[MyFetchObjectsOperation alloc] init];
    op.successBlock = ^(NSMutableDictionary * allByCategory, NSMutableDictionary * allByName) {
        self.allObjectsByCategory = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] initWithDictionary:allByCategory];
        self.allObjectsByName = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] initWithDictionary:allByName];
        aBlock(YES);
    };

    op.failureBlock = ^(NSError * err) {
        aBlock(NO);
    };

    [self.queue addOperation:op];
}
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It seems to me that you want to use a more persistent way of storing this NSMutableDictionary. Storing it on a singleton does not guarantee that the data will be kept around forever. Just as long as the memory is allocated for your application (really your singleton itself). When the application goes into the background the OS has the ability to free this memory as needed (as @CodaFi has mentioned).

I would suggest you either store this data using Core Data or save it to a file to be read for later. There are other options as well (NSUserDefaults for example) but I'd probably have to know more about why you want to keep this data around to really know what the best approach would be.

A easy way to save this NSMutableDictionary to a file would use the following code:

NSArray *paths = NSSearchPathForDirectoriesInDomains(NSDocumentDirectory, NSUserDomainMask, YES);
NSString *plistPath = [[paths objectAtIndex:0] stringByAppendingPathComponent:@"myPlistFile.plist"];
[yourDictionary writeToFile:plistPath atomically:YES];

You could retrieve the data using the following code (assuming you use the same way of generating your plistPath from above):

NSMutableDictionary *myDictionary = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] initWithContentsOfFile:plistPath];
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Maybe you're doing something like:

NSMutableDictionary *newDict = yourDictionary;

and then removing objects of newDict

newDict = nil;

which will also remove the values from yourDictionary.

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