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Quick summary of what I need help with:

  • What's an immutable class?
  • With Java's String class, why can you not 'point' one String variable at another (using C terminology) like you can with other classes? For example, String x=(String)y; copies y's value over to x. Why?
    • For example, with my own class ('Test'), Test x=(Test)y; does properly 'point' x at y.
  • Does String's behaviour here have anything to do with its immutability?

I have this Java program... can someone explain what's going on with the references?

public class Main {

    public static void foo(String a){
        a="2";
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String x="1";
        foo(x);
        System.out.println("x="+x);

    }

}

Output:

x=1

Expected Output:

x=2

What's going on? I thought that whatever I do to a within foo would also affect x, as a is just an alias for x - no?

A similar issue here:

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String x=new String("1");
        String y=new String("2");
        y=x;
        x="3";
        System.out.println("x="+x);
        System.out.println("y="+y);
    }

}

Output:

x=3
y=1

Expected Output:

x=3
y=3

Can someone explain this?


Edit:

Why do these examples produce the expected results and my above examples with String didn't?

1:

public class Main {

    private static class Test{
        public String val;
        public Test(String set){val=set;}
        public Test(){}
    }
    public static void foo(Test a){
        a.val="2";
    }
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Test x=new Test("1");
        foo(x);
        System.out.println("x="+x.val);
    }

}

Output (and expected output):

x=2

2:

public class Main {

    private static class Test{
        public String val;
        public Test(String set){val=set;}
        public Test(){}
    }
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Test x=new Test("1");
        Test y=new Test("2");
        x=y;
        x.val="3";
        System.out.println("x="+x.val);
        System.out.println("y="+y.val);
    }

}

Output (and Expected Output):

x=3
y=3
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First of all: I know it's hypocritical but I think the best place to get this idea solid in your head is to grab a Java textbook (or possibly an online tutorial). I don't think you'll be able to get a solid understanding of these concepts through our answers.

Maybe try (I haven't read these, only skimmed):


I'm going to try and answer this a different way. The correct answer is out there already but this sort of thing is notoriously hard IMO to explain if you're not face-to-face with the person.

This is your first piece of code:

public class Main {

    public static void foo(String a){
        a="2";
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String x="1";
        foo(x);
        System.out.println("x="+x);

    }

}

The problem is the line a = "2". In simple terms it means: "make the variable 'a' point to a String instance with the value '2'". What this implies is: "forget whatever String 'a' is currently pointing to so it can point to this new value". So you are telling it to forget that it points to the String that you passed (as an argument to the method), so it can point to the new one.

The String you passed as an argument still exists, and the variable 'x' still points to it. You didn't change the String which the variable 'x' points to, you only changed the String which the variable 'a' points to.

As mentioned above this is because Java uses pass-by-value and not pass-by-reference.

share|improve this answer
    
This is very helpful. So the = operator with string essentially does this? public void set(String n){this.val=n.val} (where n is the string to the right of the = operator) –  Cam Mar 7 '10 at 2:22
2  
The key here is to realise that the variables 'x', 'y', etc. just point to instances of String. They are not the String themselves. So you can point them to different Strings and they the String they pointed to is still uhnchanged (although it may now be lost forever). So saying String x = "1"; String y = "2"; String z = x; Will give you x and z pointing to the same String "1". You could then say x = y; and now x AND y will point to the same String "2" and z will still be pointing to "1". This is the same for any Object (immutable or not) or primative. –  David Mar 7 '10 at 2:39
    
Got it! Thanks for sticking with me here. I get it now :) –  Cam Mar 7 '10 at 2:48
    
@incrediman - "So the = operator with string essentially does this? public void set(String n){this.val=n.val}". Absolutely not! Firstly, there is no special assignment operator for Strings; assignment works exactly the same way for ALL reference types. Secondly, assignment for reference types assigns the references. It does NOT change the state of the referenced object. Not ever. Period. –  Stephen C Mar 7 '10 at 2:53
    
Alright, then I don't get it. WHY is it that after assigning x=y for a String, that changing x later doesn't change y??? If I do that with any other class it does change y!! –  Cam Mar 7 '10 at 3:23

Java is pass by value - always.

The thing that's being passed is the reference to an object, not the object itself.

In the case of a String, it's an immutable class. So you can't change what that String reference is pointing to in the foo() method.

However, you can do this:

package cruft;

public class Main
{
    private String value;

    public Main(String s)
    {
        this.value = s;
    }

    public String getValue()
    {
        return value;
    }

    public void setValue(String value)
    {
        this.value = value;
    }

    public static void foo(Main main)
    {
        main.setValue("2");
    }

    @Override
    public String toString()
    {
        return "Main{" +
            "value='" + value + '\'' +
            '}';
    }

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Main main = new Main("1");
        System.out.println("before: " + main);
        foo(main);
        System.out.println("after: " + main);

    }

}

See the difference? I didn't change the reference to Main in the foo() method; I merely changed part of its state.

share|improve this answer
    
Why the down vote? Just because you don't understand it doesn't mean it's a bad answer. –  duffymo Mar 7 '10 at 1:24
2  
Immutability of the String class is irrelevant, its the pass-by-value semantic copying the reference that matters. –  Kevin Montrose Mar 7 '10 at 1:29
    
"Java is pass by value - always." - like I said. And then I demonstrated how to change the state of the object that's passed in. –  duffymo Mar 7 '10 at 1:37

a != x in the first case. a is a copy of the reference x, think a copy of a pointer to a common String. So, a = "2" is saying make a equal to a reference to "2", not make the value pointed to be a equal to "2".

A similar misunderstanding is occurring in the second case, x & y are distinct reference whom you are updating to point to different values.

Basically, all Java values (excluding primitives) are reference types (some_class* in C++ notation) and all functions are invoked as pass-by-value. So, invoking a method with some reference types as parameters makes copies of those parameters.

share|improve this answer
    
For the second example, that makes sense. But in the first example, I still don't quite understand. Is this behaviour specific to String? I mean, wouldn't it behave how I want with my own class? –  Cam Mar 7 '10 at 1:28
    
@incrediman - you're making a copy of the reference to the String when you invoke foo(). You then update that reference (the copy) to point to something new, it has no effect on the original reference. The immutability of String doesn't matter. Now, if you were to invoke a method things since both references (the original and the copy) point to the same object instance. –  Kevin Montrose Mar 7 '10 at 1:34
    
@Kevin Montrose Can you rephrase that last sentence? –  Cam Mar 7 '10 at 1:36
    
@Kevin Montrose Also I've updated my post to help explain my original reply to your answer: Why do I get expected results with my own class and not with String? –  Cam Mar 7 '10 at 1:41
1  
@incrediman - "If you were to invoke a method (or reference a field) things would be different since both references (the original and the copy) point to the same object instance." Typo, my bad. Your new example behaves differently because you use the '.' operator, which "dereferences the pointer" in C nomenclature; your "Test class" example is not equivalent to your original string one, basically. –  Kevin Montrose Mar 7 '10 at 2:51

Think of Objects as being blobs of data floating around in the memory. The variables you define, such as String s, are pointing to those blobs: they do not represent the blobs themselves.

In contrast, ints refer to values directly.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, that makes sense. x is still getting a reference of itself passed by value (as expected), but instead of a becoming an alias, it simply copies the value found via the reference passed and creates itself as a new String (right?). So... if I used my own custom (non-immutable class), I'd get the expected results in both cases? Furthermore, how can I distinguish between immutable and non-immutable classes, and how can I create my own immutable classes? And what precisely is the behaviour of an immutable class? –  Cam Mar 7 '10 at 1:23
    
This is incorrect, mutability of the String class is not important in this case. –  Kevin Montrose Mar 7 '10 at 1:25
1  
Funny that @Incrediman says "+1", but so far the post only has one downvote and no upvotes. –  Paul Tomblin Mar 7 '10 at 1:28
    
I un-upvoted it after Kevin's comment and couldn't edit my post :) –  Cam Mar 7 '10 at 1:29
    
I changed my answer. Hope it's more helpful to you. –  Tom R Mar 7 '10 at 1:31

Why do I get expected results with my own class and not with String?

Simply stated because you are comparing apples and oranges. Your String example is doing a = "2"; but your later examples are doing a.val = "2";. The first one is trying to update the reference in the caller ... which doesn't work. The second one is succeeding because it you are telling it (using the "." operator) to change the state of the object denoted by the reference.

If you changed your later examples to do what the String example is trying to do, you would find that they don't work either.

A second point is that you cannot change the state of a String because the String API is designed to make this impossible. By contrast, your class has been designed to allow changes to its state. But this does not explain the behavior you are seeing, because your String example is not even trying to change the String's state.

share|improve this answer
    
String x=y; where y is a String isn't trying to change x's state? Why not? –  Cam Mar 7 '10 at 2:08
1  
@incrediman - Because it isn't! Because that is how Java is defined! When you write x = expr when x and expr have any object type, you are assigning a reference value to x NOT changing the state of the object previously referenced by x. –  Stephen C Mar 7 '10 at 2:23
    
Alright. So let's say I do this: String y=new String;String x="cat";y=x;x="dog"... why are x and y now different? –  Cam Mar 7 '10 at 2:29
    
@incrediman - because you assigned different references to them. –  Stephen C Mar 7 '10 at 2:39
    
So is String x="cat" the same thing as saying String x=new String("cat")?? That's the only thing I can think of that would explain this. –  Cam Mar 7 '10 at 3:28

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