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I have a while loop reading in a char 'c', I have a check to see if the the char is an operator; '+', '-', '/', or '*'. The while loop reads through character by character but it doesn't stop...if the last char inputed is '+' for example. It will stay in the loop with the char 'c' set to '+' forever.

stack<int> num;
char c;
int n,count=0,a,b;
while (cin>>c)
{
    if (c != '+' && c != '-' && c != '/' && c != '*')
     {
         cout << c << endl;
         n = (c - 48);
         num.push(n);
         cin >> c;
         count++;
     }
     else if (c == '+' || c == '-' || c == '/' || c == '*')
     {
         cout << "count is " << count << endl;
         if (count>1)
         {
            b =  num.top();
            a = num.top();
            num.pop();
            num.pop();

            if (c == '+')
            {
                num.push(a+b);
                count--;
            }
            else if (c == '-')
            {
                num.push(a+b);
                count--;
            }
            else if (c == '/')
            {
                if (b != 0)
                {
                    num.push(a/b);
                    count--;
                }
                else
                {
                    cout << "division by zero" << endl;
                    return(0);
                }
            }
            else if (c == '*')
            {
                num.push(a*b);
                count--;
            }
            else
            {
                cout << "invalid input" << endl;
                return(0);          
            }
         }
         else
         {
             cout << "stack underflow" << c << endl;
             return(0);
         }
     }
     cout << c << endl;
 }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Your question is not cl;ear enough. –  haccks May 30 at 5:46
    
Your question isn't clear and that loop should work just fine. @TeoZec he won't need a break statement there, the condition should work just fine. –  Raphael M. May 30 at 5:47
    
why not use getline? getline(cin, string) then do stuff? –  Ben May 30 at 5:49
    
It does not stop when there is no more input, if the last char in the line of input is a '+' then it stays in the while loop doing calculations with the '+' forever instead of exiting the while once it has read everything. –  user3678093 May 30 at 5:49
1  
@user3678093 can you post more of the code? –  Raphael M. May 30 at 5:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Now that you clarified your question it's way clearer. And @TeoZec answer should be right. I just wanna note two things that seem buggy in your above code:

else if (c == '-')
{
    num.push(a+b);
    count--;
}

here you probably wanted a-b instead.

if (count>1)
{
    b =  num.top();
    a = num.top();
    num.pop();
    num.pop();

b and a will be the same number here, you should call pop() before getting the second number, like:

if (count>1)
{
    b =  num.top();
    num.pop();
    a = num.top();
    num.pop();
share|improve this answer
    
Both are bugs thank you! –  user3678093 May 30 at 7:32

Its because you have no condition to terminate your while loop, you will need to add either more conditions to your while like so:

while(cin>>c && c != '+' && c != '-' && c != '*' && c != '/')
{
    //do stuff here
}

Or add a break to the inside of your while loop, after performing your checks to see what character was entered.

share|improve this answer
1  
he has a condition in his loop tho. cin>>c will return false once it reaches eof and the loop will end. –  Raphael M. May 30 at 5:49
    
thats what i thought, yet it isn't detecting the eof –  user3678093 May 30 at 5:50
    
Yes, but it will only exit the loop once it gets to the end of the line, not when it finds one of the characters he is looking for. –  Daniel May 30 at 5:51
    
@user3678093 cin >> c stops at eof. Maybe you are mixed up between eof and eol. –  Matt McNabb May 30 at 5:52
1  
The EOF character will not be created when you enter a line in the console. You would need to enter it manually by pressing CTRL-D, or the alternative is to add a break to your loop. –  Daniel May 30 at 5:56

There are several problems with your code. For starters, I don't understand the purpose of the cin >> c in the if branch; you input a character, but you never seem to use it; it's just lost. And of course, there's no need for the if part in the else if, since it is the complement of the condition of the if. And of course, a switch is far more natural that you if/else if chain when comparing a single character against a number of different constants. And of course, '0' isn't always 48 (and even if it were, '0' is a lot more readable than 48).

As for staying in the loop with the char c set to +, I don't see it. The only loop I see is while( std::cin >> c ), and this will either read a new character, or terminate.

If your goal is to just read a single line, it's probably better to use std::getline, then iterate over the string you input:

std::string line;
while ( std::getline( std::cin, line ) ) {
    //  Set up your stack here...
    for ( std::string::const_iterator it = line.begin(); it != line.end(); ++ it ) {
        if ( isdigit( static_cast<unsigned char>( *it ) ) ) {
            //  process digit...
        } else if ( ispunct( static_cast<unsigned char>( *it ) ) ) {
            //  process punctuation, with eventually
            switch ( *it ) {
            case '+':
                //  addition...
                break;
            case '-':
                //  substraction...
                break;
            //  ...
            default:
                //  illegal operator...
                break;
            }
        } else {
            //  process anything else...
        }

    }
}

Alternatively, you can define an isOperator function, along the lines of:

bool
isOperator( char ch )
{
    static std::string const legalOps( "+-*/" );
    return std::find( legalOps.begin(), legalOps.end(), ch) != legalOps.end();
}
share|improve this answer

This should work:

#include <cstdio>
...

int c; // As pointed out by James Kanze in his comment, c should be an int to detect EOF
do {
    c = getchar();
    // Do stuff
} while ((c != '\n') && c != EOF))

You don't need to check just for EOF, but also for the line terminator.

share|improve this answer
    
cin >> c will never set c to '\n' (unless you unset skipws), so the second test will always evaluate to true. –  James Kanze May 30 at 12:39
    
@james so he could use getchar(), like in C. Thanks for noting, I'll correct it. But why won't cin set c to'\n'? I'm not an expert about C++, I would like some explanations. Thanks! –  Teo Zec May 30 at 12:44
    
Your revised version won't work either; it will go into an endless loop at end of file. As for not seeing the '\n', >> is for formatted input (with one very special exception), and starts by skipping white space. And '\n' is a white space characters. –  James Kanze May 30 at 12:57
    
@james ok, thanks for explanation. But I think the version with getchar() will work as long as we get the input from a keyboard. However, I'll fix it so that it will work also stdin is a file. Thanks for the explanation again. –  Teo Zec May 30 at 13:01
    
The results of getchar() (which are the same as std::cin::get()) must be assigned to an int, not a char, before being tested; otherwise, you cannot detect end of file. He could do: for ( int c = getchar(); c != EOF && c != '\n'; c = getchar() ). If he wants to keep c a char, he could do while ( std::cin.get( c ) && c != '\n' ). In both cases, of course, he'd have to handle white space in the line himself, since it won't be stripped. –  James Kanze May 30 at 13:31

After you clarified it, the problem seems understandable

I think in your case the program never goes to cin statement inside outer while() because once value is inputted, it is stored in a dummy/anonymous variable in the loop brackets which is always true (because you are not entering null value, if we CAN enter null value i would really like to know how?)

  • shift cin statement inside while

  • do typecasting before assignment

  • use getch() or system("pause") before return(0)

and you are good to go

share|improve this answer
    
Undefined behavior as written, since you use the input value without checking that the input worked. –  James Kanze May 30 at 12:41
    
And of course, the numerical order of the character codes is totally unspecified, and may vary from one system to the next. –  James Kanze May 30 at 12:59
    
@JamesKanze- but i am comparing standard ASCII's how can they vary? and how to check input worked? –  Ritwik May 30 at 14:05
    
What makes you think that the system uses ASCII? (IBM mainframes still use EBCDIC, for example.) –  James Kanze May 30 at 16:53

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