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How would I do something like:

ceiling(N/500)

N representing a number.

But in a linux Bash script

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6 Answers 6

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Call out to a scripting language with a ceil function. Given $NUMBER:

python -c "from math import ceil; print ceil($NUMBER/500.0)"

or

perl -w -e "use POSIX; print ceil($NUMBER/500.0), qq{\n}"
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In Perl, wouldn't you use: ceil($ARGV[0]/$ARGV[1]) to use the two script arguments? And then you'd use single quotes around the script. Or, using double quotes you can let the shell substitute its $1, $2. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 7 '10 at 3:53
    
Sure, yeah, <code>perl -w -e 'use POSIX; print ceil($ARGV[0]/$ARGV[1]), qq{\n}' $N 500</code> is fine too, etc. TMTOWTDI. The important bit is using a standards-based ceil implementation. –  Josh McFadden Mar 7 '10 at 4:11
    
Code tag fail? I'm new here. :( –  Josh McFadden Mar 7 '10 at 4:12
    
Haha, yeah you can't code code in the comments :( but doesn't matter, I prefer to use Python anyway :) Thanks for the code! –  Mint Mar 7 '10 at 4:20
    
In comments, wrap code in backticks, btw. –  BRPocock Feb 19 at 3:08

Why use external script languages? You get floor by default. To get ceil, do

$ divide=8; by=3; let result=($divide+$by-1)/$by; echo $result
3
$ divide=9; by=3; let result=($divide+$by-1)/$by; echo $result
3
$ divide=10; by=3; let result=($divide+$by-1)/$by; echo $result
4
$ divide=11; by=3; let result=($divide+$by-1)/$by; echo $result
4
$ divide=12; by=3; let result=($divide+$by-1)/$by; echo $result
4
$ divide=13; by=3; let result=($divide+$by-1)/$by; echo $result
5
....
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Thanks for sharing this great tip. –  solidsnack May 21 '13 at 12:20
    
Nice one, by solving with a mathematical characteristic. –  samwize Jun 4 '13 at 3:04

You can use awk

#!/bin/bash
number="$1"
divisor="$2"
ceiling() {
  awk -vnumber="$number" -vdiv="$divisor" '
  function ceiling(x){return x%1 ? int(x)+1 : x}
  BEGIN{ print ceiling(number/div) }'
}
ceiling

output

$ ./shell.sh 1.234 500
1

Or if there's a choice, you can use a better shell that does floating point, eg zsh

integer ceiling_result
ceiling_divide() {
  ceiling_result=$(($1/$2))
  echo $((ceiling_result+1))
}

ceiling_divide 1.234 500
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Here's a solution using bc (which should be installed just about everywhere):

ceiling_divide() {
  ceiling_result=`echo "($1 + $2 - 1)/$2" | bc`
}

Here's another purely in bash:

# Call it with two numbers.
# It has no error checking.
# It places the result in a global since return() will sometimes truncate at 255.

# Short form from comments (thanks: Jonathan Leffler)
ceiling_divide() {
  ceiling_result=$((($1+$2-1)/$2))
}

# Long drawn out form.
ceiling_divide() {
  # Normal integer divide.
  ceiling_result=$(($1/$2))
  # If there is any remainder...
  if [ $(($1%$2)) -gt 0 ]; then
    # rount up to the next integer
    ceiling_result=$((ceiling_result + 1))
  fi
  # debugging
  # echo $ceiling_result
}
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and how are you going to divide if $1 is floating point? –  ghostdog74 Mar 7 '10 at 3:41
2  
You can simplify that to remove the conditional stuff: ceiling_result=$((($1+$2-1)/$2)) –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 7 '10 at 3:50
    
@1ch1g0 He said in Bash. There's no floating point in bash. His example showed integers as well and he wants an integer result. Anyway, I added a solution that uses bc. It'll handle the floating point numbers. –  Harvey Mar 7 '10 at 4:31

This is a simple solution using Awk:

If you want the ceil of ($a/$b) use

echo "$a $b" | awk '{print int( ($1/$2) + 1 )}'

and the floor use

echo "$a $b" | awk '{print int($1/$2)}'

Note that I just echo the dividend '$a' as the first field of the line to awk and the divisor '$b' as the second.

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2  
int( ($1/$2) + 1 ) != ceil($1/$2) if $1/$2 is integer! –  Imp May 24 '12 at 3:22
    
This is wrong. Your ceil method will return the wrong results for divisions with no remainder. For example 2/2 is one (and no remainder) and ceil(1) should return 1. Your method returns 2. –  StFS Apr 7 at 11:16
Floor () {
  DIVIDEND=${1}
  DIVISOR=${2}
  RESULT=$(( ( ${DIVIDEND} - ( ${DIVIDEND} % ${DIVISOR}) )/${DIVISOR} ))
  echo ${RESULT}
}
R=$( Floor 8 3 )
echo ${R}

Ceiling () {
  DIVIDEND=${1}
  DIVISOR=${2}
  $(( ( ( ${DIVIDEND} - ( ${DIVIDEND} % ${DIVISOR}) )/${DIVISOR} ) + 1 ))
  echo ${RESULT}
}
R=$( Ceiling 8 3 )
echo ${R}
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