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I would like to calculate event / stimulus triggered averages computationally efficient. Assuming I have got a signal, e.g.

signal = [random.random() for i in xrange(0, 1000)]

with n_signal datapoints

n_signal = len(signal) 

I know that this signal is sampled with a rate of

Fs = 25000 # Hz

In this case I know that the total time of the signal

T_sec = n_signal / float(Fs)  

At specific times, certain events occur, e.g.

t_events = [0.01, 0.017, 0.018, 0.022, 0.034, 0.0345, 0.03456]

Now I would like to find the signal from a certain time before these events, e.g.

t_bef = 0.001

until a certain time after these events, e.g.

t_aft = 0.002

And once I have got all of these chunks of the signal, I would like to average these. In the past I would have created the time vector of the signal

t_signal = numpy.linspace(0, T_sec, n_signal)

and looked for all of the indices for t_events in t_signal e.g. using numpy.serachsorted (Link)

Since I know the sampling rate of the signal, these can be done much quicker, like

indices = [int(i * Fs) for i in t_events]

This saves me the memory for t_signal and I do not have to go through the whole signal to find my indices.

Next, I would determine how many data samples t_bef and t_aft are corresponding to

nsamples_t_bef = int(t_bef * Fs)
nsamples_t_aft = int(t_aft * Fs)

and I would save the signal chunks in a list

signal_chunks = list()
for i in xrange(0, len(t_events)):
    signal_chunks.append(signal[indices[i] - nsamples_t_bef : indices[i] + nsamples_t_aft])

And finally I am averaging these

event_triggered_average = numpy.mean(signal_chunks, axis = 0)

If I am interested in the time vector, I am calculating it with

t_event_triggered_average = numpy.linspace(-t_signal[nsamples_t_bef], t_signal[nsamples_t_aft], nsamples_t_bef + nsamples_t_aft)

Now my questions: Is there a computational more efficient way to do this? If I have got a signal with many data points and many events, this computation can take a while. Is a list the best data structure to save these chunks in? Do you know how to get the chunks of data quicker? Maybe using buffer? Thanks in advance for your comments and advice.

Minimum working example

import numpy
import random

random.seed(0)
signal = [random.random() for i in xrange(0, 1000)]

# sampling rate
Fs = 25000 # Hz

# total time of the signal
n_signal = len(signal) 
T_sec = n_signal / float(Fs)  

# time of events of interest
t_events = [0.01, 0.017, 0.018, 0.022, 0.034, 0.0345, 0.03456]

# and their corresponding indices
indices = [int(i * Fs) for i in t_events]

# define the time window of interest around each event
t_bef = 0.001
t_aft = 0.002

# and the corresponding index offset
nsamples_t_bef = int(t_bef * Fs)
nsamples_t_aft = int(t_aft * Fs)

# vector of signal times
t_signal = numpy.linspace(0, T_sec, n_signal)

signal_chunks = list()
for i in xrange(0, len(t_events)):
    signal_chunks.append(signal[indices[i] - nsamples_t_bef : indices[i] + nsamples_t_aft])

# average signal value across chunks
event_triggered_average = numpy.mean(signal_chunks, axis = 0)

# not sure what's going on here
t_event_triggered_average = numpy.linspace(-t_signal[nsamples_t_bef],
                                            t_signal[nsamples_t_aft],
                                            nsamples_t_bef + nsamples_t_aft)
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I've edited your question so that you have a minimum working example of your code. This should hopefully help people who are looking at the question. Feel free to edit the code/comments if I've misinterpreted anything. –  Mr E May 30 at 10:37
    
@Mr E: Thanks, that's was a good idea. Next time I'll post something I'll remind myself to use a minimal working example. –  xaneon May 30 at 16:29
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1 Answer 1

Since your signal is defined on a regular grid, you could do some arithmetic to find indices for all the samples that you require. Then you can construct the array with chunks using a single indexing operation.

import numpy as np

# Making some test data
n_signal = 1000
signal = np.random.rand(n_signal)
Fs = 25000 # Hz
t_events = np.array([0.01, 0.017, 0.018, 0.022, 0.034, 0.0345, 0.03456])

# Preferences
t_bef = 0.001
t_aft = 0.002

# The number of samples in a chunk
nsamples = int((t_bef+t_aft) * Fs)

# Create a vector from 0 up to nsamples
sample_idx = np.arange(nsamples)

# Calculate the index of the first sample for each chunk
# Require integers, because it will be used for indexing
start_idx = ((t_events - t_bef) * Fs).astype(int)

# Use broadcasting to create an array with indices
# Each row contains consecutive indices for each chunk
idx = start_idx[:, None] + sample_idx[None, :]

# Get all the chunks using fancy indexing
signal_chunks = signal[idx]

# Calculate the average like you did earlier
event_triggered_average = signal_chunks.mean(axis=0)

Note, the line with .astype(int) does not round to nearest integer, but rounds towards zero.

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1  
Well explained. With events happening at arbitrary times there is nothing more one can do than fancy indexing, which should definitely bring a significant speed up wrt looping. –  eickenberg May 30 at 11:51
    
@moarningsun: Thank you for your code using indexing. I have just tested it and found that it is about 7 times faster on my machine than my minimal working example above. –  xaneon May 30 at 16:32
    
@xaneon: Oh only 7 times, that's a little disappointing to be honest. And unfortunately I don't have any idea of another Numpy method to do this fast... –  moarningsun May 30 at 17:38
    
You can speed things up a tiny bit by replacing signal[idx] with np.take(signal, idx). –  Mr E May 30 at 18:18
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