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I'm a new Python programmer who is making the leap from 2.6.4 to 3.1.1. Everything has gone fine until I tried to use the 'else if' statement. The interpreter gives me a syntax error after the 'if' in 'else if' for a reason I can't seem to figure out.

def function(a):
    if a == '1':
        print ('1a')
    else if a == '2'
        print ('2a')
    else print ('3a')

function(input('input:'))

I'm probably missing something very simple; however, I haven't been able to find the answer on my own.

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2  
I don't think this works in 2.6.4. –  wRAR Mar 7 '10 at 5:38
    
Indeed, this element of Python syntax and semantics did not change between these versions. Possibly never at all. –  Mike Graham Mar 7 '10 at 7:56
    
You can start with a good tutorial on if/else in python: dreamsyssoft.com/python-scripting-tutorial/ifelse-tutorial.php –  Triton Man Jan 10 '13 at 14:05

7 Answers 7

up vote 156 down vote accepted

In python "else if" is spelled "elif".
Also, you need a colon after the elif and the else.

Simple answer to a simple question. I had the same problem, when I first started (in the last couple of weeks).

So your code should read:

def function(a):
    if a == '1':
        print('1a')
    elif a == '2':
        print('2a')
    else:
        print('3a')

function(input('input:'))
share|improve this answer
    
no worries, we all have to learn sometime. I find it weird that python places such an elphisise on readbility and then goes and use elkif instead of else it. I suggest keeping the python API manual open at all times: docs.python.org/3.1 the important links are Tutorial: docs.python.org/3.1/tutorial/index.html Language reference: docs.python.org/3.1/reference/index.html Library refernce: docs.python.org/3.1/library/index.html –  Oxinabox Mar 7 '10 at 10:37

Do you mean elif?

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def function(a):
    if a == '1':
        print ('1a')
    elif a == '2':
        print ('2a')
    else:
        print ('3a')
share|improve this answer

since olden times, the correct syntax for if/else if in Python is elif. By the way, you can use dictionary if you have alot of if/else.eg

d={"1":"1a","2":"2a"}
if not a in d: print("3a")
else: print (d[a])

For msw, example of executing functions using dictionary.

def print_one(arg=None):
    print "one"

def print_two(num):
    print "two %s" % num

execfunctions = { 1 : (print_one, ['**arg'] ) , 2 : (print_two , ['**arg'] )}
try:
    execfunctions[1][0]()
except KeyError,e:
    print "Invalid option: ",e

try:
    execfunctions[2][0]("test")
except KeyError,e:
    print "Invalid option: ",e
else:
    sys.exit()
share|improve this answer
    
You can, but please do not do this. A dictionary is not a good replacement for an elif. –  S.Lott Mar 7 '10 at 5:09
    
@s.lott, OP's case is simple. If he has to check for many values of a, a dictionary is neater. you might make it a habit not to use it, but i have been using it and i like this approach better than coding many if/else. heck, i even use dictionary to execute functions. –  ghostdog74 Mar 7 '10 at 5:27
    
@ghostdog: I know that you can use dictionaries to execute functions but the idea scares me like computed gotos or pasting Tcl strings together and execing them. Is this good practice? Can you name an example? –  msw Mar 7 '10 at 5:35
    
@msw: It's very good practice. Example: you are reading an XML stream not for some simple scraping exercise but one where you need to do different processing for different element tags e.g. an Excel 2007 spreadsheet file is a zip of multiple XML documents, some very complex. You have a separate method for each tag. You dispatch via a dictionary. Nothing to be scared of. If the method for handling <foo> is do_foo, you can even build the dict on the fly when the app starts up. –  John Machin Mar 7 '10 at 6:52
    
understood, thanks much. –  msw Mar 7 '10 at 14:23

Here is a little refactoring of your function (it does not use "else" or "elif"):

def function(a):
    if a not in (1, 2):
        a = 3
    print(str(a) + "a")

@ghostdog74: Python 3 requires parentheses for "print".

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python 3 replaced python 2's print statement with a function thus the required parentheses, and if you've going to so that you might as well just use sys.stdout.write –  Dan D. Aug 26 '10 at 14:07
1  
should be ('1', '2'), the op is using strings –  priestc Dec 20 '11 at 16:23

It looks like your missing some colons on the 'else if' and 'else' statements.

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1  
However, else if does not exist. –  scravy Sep 10 '12 at 12:16

Python 3.x has had some changes, which means some python2.7 programs may not work.

I know this answer may be be late but it points some things out.

Python 3.x's equivalent of else if has been shrunk to elif. This means all else if code will now have to be elif.

This here is an example:

print ("Hello! Type a letter. (a for adding, s for subtracting)")
answer = input()
if answer = "a":
adding() #This would lead to a define, e.g def adding():

elif answer = "b":
subtracting() #This would lead to a define, e.g def adding():

else:
print ("Invalid selection!")

This narrows it slightly and makes sorting things out much easier.

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Its called elif in python 2.5, 2.6 and 2.7 as well... so this is not really new for python 3.x, and has already been stated in existing answers... Furthermore your conditionals need to use == and not =... not to mention your missing indentation. –  Dyrborg Mar 15 at 21:01

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