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I'm writing a little project which interacts with a set of servers using HTTP 1.1 GET and POST. The server gives me the response after some header lines, so I though on using strtok() function using \n as the delimiter but there is a crash whenever I try to do so.

Is there any simple way to parse a HTTP response in C? I would like not to use 3rd party libraries for this but if it was really necesary I won't have any problem.

Thank you very much for everything.

EDIT: Here is some example code, just trying to print the lines:

char *response = "HTTP/1.1 200 OK\nServer: Apache-Coyote/1.1\nPragma: no-cache"

char *token = NULL;
token = strtok(response, "\n");
while (token) {
    printf("Current token: %s.\n", token);
    token = strtok(NULL, "\n");
}
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2  
please post your code. –  Mitch Wheat Mar 7 '10 at 4:41
    
When used in a threaded or multi-process program, strtok_r() may be necessary to stay safe. If available, consider using it. –  mctylr Mar 7 '10 at 5:07
    
Attempting to modify any element of the character array coming from a "..." string literal is undefined behavior; see c0x.coding-guidelines.com/6.4.5.html and catb.org/jargon/html/N/nasal-demons.html . –  ephemient Mar 7 '10 at 5:47
    
There's a lot more to writing a good HTTP client than just parsing the response. Do you want to support keep-alive connections? Different transfer encodings? Compression? Proxies? Some of that could be lumped under the heading of correctly parsing the response, some of it is clearly more than that. Having implemented such a library before, my totally unbiased advice is to use a library... –  Steve Jessop Mar 7 '10 at 13:54
    
Oh and on your existing code: HTTP responses are \r\n delimited, not just \n. Your current tokenization code will leave spurious \r characters at the ends of lines (that said it's wise to detect and support just \n, in case you hit a non-conforming server). And to identify the lines you need to support line-folding, as described in section 2.2 of RFC2616. Parsing an HTTP response can nevertheless be "simple", but only if you decide what features of HTTP/1.1 you're going to ignore. –  Steve Jessop Mar 7 '10 at 14:05

2 Answers 2

The problem in the code you've posted is pretty simple: strtok works by modifying the string you pass to it. Modifying a string literal gives undefined behavior. A truly minuscule change to your code lets it work (I've also headed the appropriate headers, and moved the executable part into a function:

#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

char response[] = "HTTP/1.1 200 OK\nServer: Apache-Coyote/1.1\nPragma: no-cache";

int main() { 
    char *token = NULL;
    token = strtok(response, "\n");
    while (token) {
        printf("Current token: %s.\n", token);
        token = strtok(NULL, "\n");
    }
    return 0;
}

In real use, you'll be reading the HTTP response into a buffer anyway; the problem you encountered only arises in a trivial test case like you generated. At the same time, it does point to the fact that strtok is a pretty poorly designed function, and you'd almost certainly be better off with something else.

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Not sure why you think this issue reflects poorl on strtok. The real problem is the fact that a string literal is considered a char * instead of a const char * and the issue can affect any code that modifies the string input. –  R Samuel Klatchko Mar 7 '10 at 6:27
    
It reflects poorly on strtok, because it unnecessarily restricts its range of input to data that's not only modifiable, but that you don't mind basically destroying in the process of using it. –  Jerry Coffin Mar 7 '10 at 7:06

http-parser is a simple and super-fast HTTP parser written in C for the Node.js project

It's only 2 C files, without any external dependencies.

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