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Using C# I was trying to develop the following two. The way I am doing it may have some problem and need your kind advice. In addition, I dont know whether there is any existing method to do the same.

private static String HexConverter(System.Drawing.Color c)
{
    String rtn = String.Empty;
    try
    {
        rtn = "#" + c.R.ToString("X2") + c.G.ToString("X2") + c.B.ToString("X2");
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        //doing nothing
    }

    return rtn;
}

private static String RGBConverter(System.Drawing.Color c)
{
    String rtn = String.Empty;
    try
    {
        rtn = "RGB(" + c.R.ToString() + "," + c.G.ToString() + "," + c.B.ToString() + ")";
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        //doing nothing
    }

    return rtn;
}

Thanks.

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2 Answers

up vote 37 down vote accepted

I'm failing to see the problem here. The code looks good to me.

The only thing I can think of is that the try/catch blocks are redundant -- Color is a struct and R, G, and B are bytes, so c can't be null and c.R.ToString(), c.G.ToString(), and c.B.ToString() can't actually fail (the only way I can see them failing is with a NullReferenceException, and none of them can actually be null).

You could clean the whole thing up using the following:

private static String HexConverter(System.Drawing.Color c)
{
    return "#" + c.R.ToString("X2") + c.G.ToString("X2") + c.B.ToString("X2");
}

private static String RGBConverter(System.Drawing.Color c)
{
    return "RGB(" + c.R.ToString() + "," + c.G.ToString() + "," + c.B.ToString() + ")";
}
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I'd go so far as to say that empty try-catch blocks should (almost) universally be eradicated. They have great potential to lead to buggy code, if not now then down the road when this code is modified. Still, +1 for the cleaned up code, and to the OP +1 for a well-framed question. –  JMD Jun 3 at 14:32
    
Took me a while to find the VB equivelant: String.Format("#{0:X2}{1:X2}{2:X2}", c.R, c.G, c.B) –  zacharydl Jun 30 at 19:37
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You could keep it simple and use the native colour translator:

Color red = ColorTranslator.FromHtml("#FF0000");
string redHex = ColorTranslator.ToHtml(red);

Then break the three colour pairs into decimal:

int decValue = int.Parse(hexValue, System.Globalization.NumberStyles.HexNumber);
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4  
But if I do this way, Color red = System.Drawing.Color.Red; string redHex = ColorTranslator.ToHtml(red); it does not provide the Hex Value. –  Hoque Mar 7 '10 at 7:29
    
Certainly should do, I tested that code specifically and got #"FF0000". What are you getting? You might also like to refer to the MSDN reference: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Troy Hunt Mar 7 '10 at 7:45
6  
The code you have provided works but when I change the first line of your code to : Color red = System.Drawing.Color.Red; --> Then it does not give the hex code. It gives "Red" as an output. –  Hoque Mar 7 '10 at 11:33
1  
@Hoque - Confirmed. ColorTranslator gives a "friendly" name to the color. How annoying! –  anon Feb 17 '13 at 4:36
1  
For use in CSS, the "friendly" color name still works. –  Zarepheth Sep 6 '13 at 16:54
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