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How can I use the startswith function to match any alpha character [a-zA-Z]. For example I would like to do this:

if line.startswith(ALPHA):
    Do Something
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6 Answers

up vote 22 down vote accepted

If you want to match non-ASCII letters as well, you can do:

if line and line[0].isalpha():
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+1, This is the best solution, especially if wrapped in a function or even a method of some validation class. –  Anurag Uniyal Mar 7 '10 at 10:58
    
of course, line must be a unicode object for the non-Ascii part to work. –  u0b34a0f6ae Mar 7 '10 at 11:39
9  
Even shorter: if line[:1].isalpha(): –  Will Hardy Mar 7 '10 at 11:47
    
@Will What is the difference between your answer and if line[0].isalpha(): –  teggy Mar 7 '10 at 18:57
2  
@teggy: The difference is that if line is an empty string, line[:1] will evaluate to an empty string while line[0] will raise an IndexError. –  dan04 Mar 7 '10 at 19:36
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You can pass a tuple to startswiths() (in Python 2.5+) to match any of its elements:

import string
ALPHA = string.ascii_letters
if line.startswith(tuple(ALPHA)):
    pass

Of course, for this simple case, a regex test or the in operator would be more readable.

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I did not know that. +1 not for the best answer for this question, but because that is by far the best answer for a ton of my own code. Thank you. –  DaveTheScientist May 9 '12 at 21:27
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This is probably the most efficient method:

if line != "" and line[0].isalpha():
    ...
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+1, This is the best solution, especially if wrapped in a function or even a method of some validation class. –  Carson Myers Mar 7 '10 at 10:14
3  
Why do you think that this is better than if line and line[0].isalpha():? –  John Machin Mar 7 '10 at 10:35
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An easy solution would be to use the python regex module:

import re
if re.match("^[a-zA-Z]+.*", line):
   Do Something
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-1: Using regex is massively overkill for this task. Also you only need to check the first character - this regex will try and match the whole string, which could be very long. –  Dave Kirby Mar 7 '10 at 10:12
3  
Even if you were forced to use the re module, all you needed was [a-zA-Z]. The ^ is a waste of a keystroke (read the docs section about the difference between search and match). The + is a minor waste of time (major if the string has many letters at the start); one letter is enough. The .* is a waste of 2 keystrokes and possibly a lot more time. –  John Machin Mar 7 '10 at 10:53
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if line.startswith((chr(x) for x in range(ord('a'), ord('z')+1)+range(ord('A'), ord('Z')+1)):
    # do processsing
    pass
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if you don't care about blanks in front of the string,

if line and line.lstrip()[0].isalpha(): 
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