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I have a C++ STL set with a custom ordering defined.

The idea was that when items get added to the set, they're naturally ordered as I want them.

However, what I've just realised is that the ordering predicate can change as time goes by.

Presumably, the items in the set will then no longer be in order.

So two questions really:

  1. Is it harmful that the items would then be out of order? Am I right in saying that the worst that can happen is that new entries may get put into the wrong place (which actually I can live with). Or, could this cause crashes, lost entries etc?

  2. Is there a way to "refresh" the ordering of the set? You can't seem to use std::sort() on a set. The best I can come up with is dumping out the contents to a temp container and re-add them.

Any ideas?

Thanks,

John

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Do you mean pred(a, b) at 11AM is different from pred(a, b) at 10AM? –  Constantin Oct 27 '08 at 11:18

10 Answers 10

up vote 7 down vote accepted

set uses the ordering to lookup items. If you would insert N items according to ordering1 and insert an item according to ordering2, the set cannot find out if the item is already in.

It will violate the class invariant that every item is in there only once.

So it does harm.

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The only safe way to do this with the STL is to create a new set with the changed predicate. For example you could do something like this when you needed to sort the set with a new predicate:

std::set<int> newset( oldset.begin(), oldset.end(), NewPred() );
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This is actually implementation dependent.
The STL implementation can and usually will assumes the predicate used for sorting is stable (otherwise, "sorted" would not be defined). It is at least possible to construct a valid STL implementation that formats your hard drive when you change the behavior of the predicate instance.

So, yes, you need to re-insert the items into a new set.

Alternatively, you could construct your own container, e.g. a vector + sort + lower_bound for binary search. Then you could re-sort when the predicates behavior changes.

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I agree with the other answers, that this is going to break in some strange and hard to debug ways. If you go the refresh route, you only need to do the copy once. Create a tmp set with the new sorting strategy, add each element from the original set to the tmp set, then do

 orig.swap(tmp);

This will swap the internals of the sets.

If this were me, I would wrap this up in a new class that handles all of the details, so that you can change implementations as needed. Depending on your access patterns and the number of times the sort order changes, the previously mentioned vector, sort, lowerbound solution may be preferable.

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If you can live with an unordered set, then why are you adding them into a set in the first place?

The only case I can think of is where you just want to make sure the list is unique when you add them. If that's the case then you could use a temporary set to protect additions:

if (ts.insert (value).second) {
    // insertion took place
    realContainer.push_back (value);
}

An alternative, is that depending on how frequently you'll be modifying the entries in the set, you can probably test to see if the entry will be in a different location (by using the set compare functionality) and where the position will move then remove the old entry and re-add the new one.

As everyone else has pointed out - having the set unordered really smells bad - and I would also guess that its possible got undefined behaviour according to the std.

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While this doesn't give you exactly what you want, boost::multi_index gives you similar functionality. Due to the way templates work, you will never be able to "change" the ordering predicate for a container, it is set in stone at compile time, unless you are using a sorted vector or something similar, to where you are the one maintaining the invariant, and you can sort it however you want at any given time.

Multi_index however gives you a way to order a set of elements based on multiple ordering predicates at the same time. You can then select views of the container that behave like an std::set ordered by the predicate that you care about at the time.

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This can cause lost entries, when searching for an element in a set the ordering operator is used this means that if an element was placed to the left of the root and now the ordering operator says it's to the right then that element will not longer be found.

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Here's a simple test for you:

struct comparer : public std::binary_function<int, int, bool>
{
  static enum CompareType {CT_LESS, CT_GREATER} CompareMode;
  bool operator()(int lhs, int rhs) const
  {
    if(CompareMode == CT_LESS)
    {
      return lhs < rhs;
    }
    else
    {
      return lhs > rhs;
    }
  }
};

comparer::CompareType comparer::CompareMode = comparer::CT_LESS;

typedef std::set<int, comparer> is_compare_t;

void check(const is_compare_t &is, int v)
{
  is_compare_t::const_iterator it = is.find(v);
  if(it != is.end())
  {
    std::cout << "HAS " << v << std::endl;
  }
  else
  {
    std::cout << "ERROR NO " << v << std::endl;
  }
}

int main()
{
  is_compare_t is;
  is.insert(20);
  is.insert(5);
  check(is, 5);
  comparer::CompareMode = comparer::CT_GREATER;
  check(is, 5);
  is.insert(27);
  check(is, 27);
  comparer::CompareMode = comparer::CT_LESS;
  check(is, 5);
  check(is, 27);
  return 0;
}

So, basically if you intend to be able to find the elements you once inserted you should not change the predicate used for insertions and find.

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Just a follow up:

While running this code the Visual Studio C debug libraries started throwing exceptions complaining that the "<" operator was invalid.

So, it does seem that changing the sort ordering is a bad thing. Thanks everyone!

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1) Harmful - no. Result in crashes - no. The worst is indeed a non-sorted set.

2) "Refreshing" would be the same as re-adding anyway!

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I'm interested to know why this was voted down (no, I'm not bitter ;)). I'd just like to know what it was that made it wrong. –  OJ. Oct 27 '08 at 11:44
    
Even though it wasn't me who voted it down, I'd bet it is because your answer is pretty incorrect. Reasons for this incorrectness can be found in the other answers. –  Gorpik Oct 27 '08 at 11:50
    
Other answers say that it doesn't result in crashes. Every reason they give for "harmful" is all down to non-sorted sets -- which is what i said. They also say that to reorder you must reinsert. Again, that's what I said. So, I say again, tell me why I'm wrong :) Please. –  OJ. Oct 27 '08 at 19:42

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