Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I use matlab to solve the following Ordinary Differential Equations?

x''/y = y''/x = -( x''y + 2x'y' + xy'')

with two known points, such as t=0: x(0)= x0, y(0) = y0; t=1: x(1) = x1, y(1) = y1 ? It doesn't need to be a complete formula if it is difficult. A numerical solution is ok, which means, given a specific t, I can get the value of x(t) and y(t).

If matlab is hard to do this, mathematica is also OK. But as I am not familiar with mathematica, so I would prefer matlab if possible.

Looking forward to help, thanks!

I asked the same question on stackexchange, but haven't get good answer yet. http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/812985/matlab-or-mathematica-solve-ordinary-differential-equations

Hope I can get problem solved here!

What I have tried is:

---------MATLAB

syms t

>> [x, y] = dsolve('(D2x)/y = -(y*D2x + 2Dx*Dy + x*D2y)', '(D2y)/x = -(y*D2x + 2Dx*Dy + x*D2y)','t')


Error using sym>convertExpression (line 2246)
Conversion to 'sym' returned the MuPAD error: Error: Unexpected 'identifier'.
[line 1, col 31]

Error in sym>convertChar (line 2157)
s = convertExpression(x);

Error in sym>convertCharWithOption (line 2140)
    s = convertChar(x);

Error in sym>tomupad (line 1871)
    S = convertCharWithOption(x,a);

Error in sym (line 104)
        S.s = tomupad(x,'');

Error in dsolve>mupadDsolve (line 324)
sys = [sys_sym sym(sys_str)];

Error in dsolve (line 186)
sol = mupadDsolve(args, options);

--------MATLAB

Also, I tried to add conditions, such as x(0) = 2, y(0)=8, x(1) = 7, y(1) = 18, and the errors are still similar. So what I think is that this cannot be solve by dsolve function.

So, again, the key problem is, given two known points, such as when t=0: x(0)= x0, y(0) = y0; t=1: x(1) = x1, y(1) = y1 , how I get the value of x(t) and y(t)?

Update: I tried ode45 functions. First, in order to turn the 2-order equations into 1-order, I set x1 = x, x2=y, x3=x', x4=y'. After some calculation, the equation becomes:

x(1)' = x(3)                                                (1)

x(2)' = x(4)                                                (2)

x(3)' = x(2)/x(1)*(-2*x(1)*x(3)*x(4)/(1+x(1)^2+x(2)^2))     (3)

x(4)' = -2*x(1)*x(3)*x(4)/(1+x(1)^2+x(2)^2)                 (4)

So the matlab code I wrote is:

myOdes.m

function xdot = myOdes(t,x)

xdot = [x(3); x(4); x(2)/x(1)*(-2*x(1)*x(3)*x(4)/(1+x(1)^2+x(2)^2)); -2*x(1)*x(3)*x(4)/(1+x(1)^2+x(2)^2)]

end

main.m
t0 = 0;
tf = 1;
x0 = [2 3 5 7]';
[t,x] = ode45('myOdes',[t0,tf],x0);
plot(t,x)

It can work. However, actually this is not right. Because, what I know is that when t=0, the value of x and y, which is x(1) and x(2); and when t=1, the value of x and y. But the ode functions need the initial value: x0, I just wrote the condition x0 = [2 3 5 7]' randomly to help this code work. So how to solve this problem?

UPDATE: I tried to use the function bvp4c after I realized that it is a boundary value problem and the following is my code (Suppose the two boundry value conditions are: when t=0: x=1, y=3; when t=1, x=6, y=9. x is x(1), y is x(2) ):

1. bc.m
function res = bc(ya,yb)
res = [ ya(1)-1; ya(2)-3; yb(1) - 6; yb(2)-9];
end
2. ode.m
function dydx = ode(t,x)
dydx = [x(3); x(4); x(2)/x(1)*(-2*x(1)*x(3)*x(4)/(1+x(1)^2+x(2)^2)); -2*x(1)*x(3)*x(4)/(1+x(1)^2+x(2)^2)];
end
3. mainBVP.m
solinit = bvpinit(linspace(0,6,10),[1 0 -1 0]);
sol = bvp4c(@ode,@bc,solinit);
t = linspace(0,6);
x = deval(sol,t);
plot(t,x(1,:));
hold on
plot(t,x(2,:));

plot(t,x(3,:));

plot(t,x(4,:));
x(1,:)
x(2,:)

It can work, but I don't know whether it is right. I will check it again to make sure it is the right code.

share|improve this question
    
This is a programming site, not a math site and does't support TeX. Edit your question and show us the code you used to try to solve this using dsolve (including how you defined variables and any assumptions) and what error(s) you received. Also, please indicate which version of Matlab you're using. –  horchler May 30 at 22:05

3 Answers 3

As mentioned, this isn't a math site, so try to give code or something showing some effort. However, the first step you need to do is turn the DE into normal form (i.e., no 2nd derivatives). You do this by making a separate variable equal to the derivative. Then, you use

syms x y % or any variable instead of x or y

to define variables as symbolic. Use matlabfunction to create a symbolic function based on these variables. Finally, you can use the ode45 function to solve the symbolic function while passing variable values. I recommend you look up the full documentation in matlab in order to understand it better, but here is a very basic syntax:

MyFun= matlabFunction(eq,'vars',{x,y});
[xout,yout]=ode45(@(x,Y) MyFun(variables),[variable values],Options);

Hopefully this puts you in the right direction, so try messing around with it and provide code if you need more help.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you @luthier93 ! I edited my problem. And yes, I have similar thoughts with you. However, I am not familiar with the matlab differential equation solving functions, so it will be very helpful if you can show me a more specified code to my question. Thanks again! –  ldtb May 31 at 7:12
    
@bang liu, don't use dsolve to solve the equation, use ode45. Set it up exactly as I did in my answer. Replace the "variable values" with values for x(0) and y(0) or x(1) and y(1). You can type "doc ode45" into the command window to get a full explanation. However, matlabFunction creates a function for you, which ode45 calls when it solves. It is a very convenient method. –  luthier93 May 31 at 21:56
    
Hi @luthier93 , I tried ode45. First, I set x(1) = x, x(2) = y, x(3) = x', x(4) = y'; then the 2 order odes turn into 1 order odes after some calculation. Then I use the following code: myOdes.m function xdot = myOdes(t,x) xdot = [x(3); x(4); x(2)/x(1)*(-2*x(1)*x(3)*x(4)/(1+x(1)^2+x(2)^2)); -2*x(1)*x(3)*x(4)/(1+x(1)^2+x(2)^2)] end –  ldtb Jun 1 at 16:40
    
Hi @luthier93 , I edited my problem. Please check and see whether you can help, thanks! –  ldtb Jun 1 at 16:54
    
Hi @bang liu, I think you are on the right track. Yes you do indeed need to include an initial value vector in ode45. However, if you don't want to or don't have initial values, you can redefine the ODE in terms of time, and solve over a time range. To do this you need to call the "mymode" function inside the ode45. I'm not real familiar with this method myself, but you can look it up in the documentation and it allows you to give time as the variable. You will still have to give one initial value of the function for t(0), though. –  luthier93 Jun 3 at 1:57

EDIT: This is how I would solve the problem. Note: I don't really like the matlabFunction creator but this is simply a personal preference for various reasons I won't go into.

% Seperate function of the first order state equations
function dz = firstOrderEqns(t,z)
    dz(4,1) = 0;
    dz(1) = -2.*z(3).*z(1).*z(4)./(1 + z(4).^2 + z(2).^2);
    dz(2) = z(1);
    dz(3) = -2.*z(2).*z(3).*z(1)./(1 + z(4).^2 + z(2).^2);
    dz(4) = z(3);
end

% runfirstOrderEqns
%% Initial conditions i.e. @ t=0
z1 = 5; % dy/dt = 5 (you didn't specify these initial conditions, 
%  these will depend on the system which you didn't really specify
z2 = 0; % y = 0
z3 = 5; % dx/dt = 5 (The same as for z1)
z4 = 0; % x = 0
IC = [z1, z2, z3, z4];
%% Run simulation
% Time vector: i.e closed interval [0,20]
t = [0,20]; % This is where you have to know about your system
           % i.e what is it's time domain.
           % Note: when a system has unstable poles at
           % certain places the solver can crash you need
           % to understand these.
% using default settings (See documentation ode45 for 'options') 
[T,Y] = ode45(@firstOrderEqns,t,IC);

%% Plot function
plot(T,Y(:,1),'-',T,Y(:,2),'-.',T,Y(:,3),':',T,Y(:,4),'.');
legend('dy/dt','y','dx/dt','x')

As in my comments I have made a lot of assumtions that you need to fix for example, you didn't specify what the initial conditions for the first derivatives of the states are i.e. (z1, z3) which is important for the response of the system. Also you didn't specify the time interval your interested for the simulation etc.

Note: The second m file can be used with any state function in the correct format

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for help! I edited my question. You can also see the link in my question if you still not clear about the differential equations. I am not familiar with the matlab differential equations solving functions, so if you can show the example code to my problem, it is of great help! –  ldtb May 31 at 7:10
    
Hi @Chriso , I updated my problem again, can you check and help me to solve the question if you have any ideas? Thanks very much! –  ldtb Jun 1 at 16:56
    
Hey @bangliu , I've edited my answer with how I would solve the problem numerically. –  Chriso Jun 2 at 16:43
    
Hi @Chriso , thanks a lot for your carefully answer! However, as I mentioned in the problem, I only know the value of x,y when t=0 and t=1, and I don't know the value of x' and y' when t=0. The reason is: I don't have an explicit expression of x(t) and y(t), but only know the differential equations. That is why I didn't specify the initial condition for the matlab ode45 function. And that is why I cannot solve the problem by ode45. –  ldtb Jun 2 at 19:26
    
@bang Can you give a little background into where this question arose from? As far as I can see these are a set of coupled state equations of a dynamic systems (that may be my background talking) and you may have a fundamental problem with observability if you only know 2 of the 4 states initial conditions. On the face of it the first problem, if your actually looking for a closed form solution, is that these state equations are non-linear so in fact may not have a closed form solution (that we know of). Any way I'm interested so let me know some more info and I'll try to help –  Chriso Jun 2 at 19:34
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The following is the answer we finally get @Chriso: use matlab bvp4c function to solve this boundary value problem (Suppose the two boundry value conditions are: when t=0: x=1, y=3; when t=1, x=6, y=9. x is x(1), y is x(2) ):

1. bc.m
function res = bc(ya,yb)
res = [ ya(1)-1; ya(2)-3; yb(1) - 6; yb(2)-9];
end
2. ode.m
function dydx = ode(t,x)
dydx = [x(3); x(4); x(2)/x(1)*(-2*x(1)*x(3)*x(4)/(1+x(1)^2+x(2)^2)); -2*x(1)*x(3)*x(4)/(1+x(1)^2+x(2)^2)];
end
3. mainBVP.m
solinit = bvpinit(linspace(0,6,10),[1 0 -1 0]);
sol = bvp4c(@ode,@bc,solinit);
t = linspace(0,6);
x = deval(sol,t);
plot(t,x(1,:));
hold on
plot(t,x(2,:));

plot(t,x(3,:));

plot(t,x(4,:));
x(1,:)
x(2,:)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.