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I have a c++ template class that has a nested class inside, something like:

template<int d>
class Outer_t
{
public:
    class Inner;

    Inner i;
};

template<int d>
class Outer_t<d>::Inner
{
public:
    float x;
};

int main ()
{
    Outer_t<3> o_t; // 3 or any arbitrary int
    o_t.i.x = 1.0;

  return 0;
}

This compiles without any problems. However, as soon as I declare a similar non-template class, something like this:

class Outer_1
{
public:
    class Inner;

    Inner i;
};

class Outer_1::Inner
{
public:
    float x;
};

int main ()
{
    Outer_1 o1;
    o1.i.x = 1.0;

  return 0;
}

I start getting the following error (I'm using gcc 4.6.3): "error: field ‘i’ has incomplete type". I know that I can remedy this by simply defining the inner class inline, inside the outer class:

class Outer_2
{
public:
    class Inner {
    public:
        float x;
    };

    Inner i;
};

This will compile, but I would like to avoid defining the nested class inline. So I have two questions: what is the reason for this apparently odd discrepancy between a template and non-template nested class declaration? And is there an elegant way to declare and use the nester class inside the outer class, while avoiding defining it inline, much in the same style as the template class? Thanks in advance for your help!

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+1 For a non-trivial to see behaviour for normal (aka non c++ template yonkies) C++ programmers –  Manu343726 May 31 at 9:41
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Why the compilation error?

The compiler needs to know the size of the member variable types in order to do object layout. For Outer_1, because Inner is simply a forward declaration, we don't know its size. Hence the compilation error. For Outer_2 however, the definition is inline, so we know the size of it by the time we get to the member variable of type Inner.

Why do templates get a pass?

Class templates, on the other hand, don't get defined until template instantiation occurs. In your example, the implicit instantiation occurs in main. At that point, the definition of Inner is complete and therefore its size is known. We can see that this is the case by using explicit instantiation before the definition of Inner.

 template<int d>
 class Outer_t
 {
 public:
     class Inner;

     Inner i;
 };

 template class Outer_t<3>;  // explicit instantation

 template<int d>
 class Outer_t<d>::Inner
 {
 public:
     float x;
 };

 int main ()
 {
     Outer_t<3> o_t; // 3 or any arbitrary int
     o_t.i.x = 1.0;

   return 0;
 }

Clang produces the following error:

 a.cc:7:11: error: implicit instantiation of undefined member 'Outer_t<3>::Inner'
     Inner i;
           ^
 a.cc:10:16: note: in instantiation of template class 'Outer_t<3>' requested here
 template class Outer_t<3>;
           ^
 a.cc:5:11: note: member is declared here
     class Inner;
           ^

The Solution

If you want to pull out the definition of the nested class, my suggested solution is to have it templatized just like Outer_t, but provide an alias for your convenience.

 template <typename Dummy = void>
 class Outer_1_Impl {
   public:

   class Inner;

   Inner i;
 };

 template <typename Dummy>
 class Outer_1_Impl<Dummy>::Inner {
   public:
   float x;
 };

 using Outer_1 = Outer_1_Impl<>;

 int main () {
   Outer_1 o1;
   o1.i.x = 1.0;
 }
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That is a very nice and illustrative answer, thanks! Nevertheless, it is a bit counter intuitive that the solution that makes that nested class example work is... to use a dummy templatization! –  Bruno Damas May 31 at 15:16
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You can only have non-static members in an object which have a complete definition when defining the class. In your non-template example, Outer_1::Inner is clearly not complete as it is only declared so far. The only way to create a member of Inner is, indeed, to define it like it is done for Outer_2.

Now, why does the problem not arise when using a class template? The answer is: when you are instantiating Outer_t in main(), there actually is a complete definition of Outer_t<T>::Inner accessible! ... and before instantiating Outer_t<T> with some type T the definition of Outer_t isn't really needed.

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Thank you for your quick answer: what you write makes a lot of sense. I will however set mpark's answer as accepted, as it is a bit more elaborate and provides a solution to my second question. Thanks again! –  Bruno Damas May 31 at 15:10
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