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I have two piece of C++ code running on 2 different cores. Both of them wirte to the same file. How to use openMP and make sure there is no crash?

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Added C++ tag for more coverage. –  Ninefingers Mar 7 '10 at 19:24
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3 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You want the OMP_SET_LOCK/OMP_UNSET_LOCK functions: https://computing.llnl.gov/tutorials/openMP/#OMP_SET_LOCK. Basically:

omp_lock_t writelock;

omp_init_lock(&writelock);

#pragma omp parallel for
for ( i = 0; i < x; i++ )
{
    // some stuff
   omp_set_lock(&writelock);
    // one thread at a time stuff
    omp_unset_lock(&writelock);
    // some stuff
}

omp_destroy_lock(&writelock);

Most locking routines such as pthreads semaphores and sysv semaphores work on that sort of logic, although the specific API calls are different.

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4  
You might wanna lower case your functions. –  Zorayr May 5 '12 at 3:14
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For the benefit of those coming after, using critical is actually easier here (to code and to read). You can even make named critical sections.

For example:

    #include <omp.h>

    void myParallelFunction()
    {
        #pragma omp parallel for
        for(int i=0;i<1000;++i)
        {

            // some expensive work 

            #pragma omp critical LogUpdate
            {
                // critical section where you update file        
            }

            // other work

            #pragma omp critical LogUpdate
            {
                // critical section where you update file      
            }
        }
    } 
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#pragma omp critical
{
    // write to file here
}
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Works only for code in a parallelized loop or structure –  CharlesB May 6 '11 at 5:19
3  
@Charles Yes, obviously. –  adamax May 6 '11 at 5:36
3  
I don't see why this was downvoted. Being in a parallel section is the typical case in OpenMP. –  Joe Jan 13 '12 at 21:49
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