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I need to build two programs: a server and a client in C, that implement the following:

  1. When I start the server, he creates a named pipe (O_RDONLY) blocking itself until a client connects.
  2. The client sends a msg to the client using the named pipe opened with O_WRONLY, unlocking the server.
  3. The server receives the message and then passes that message to a child (using an anonymous pipe) who prints the message on the screen.

    1. If the child process isn't created, the parent creates one
    2. The child is supposed to read from the anonymous pipe 1 message PER CLIENT. Meaning that the child is supposed to read from the anon. pipe, print the msg, then block until the next client.

The issue I'm having right now is that sometimes the child will read and print the message TWICE, when there was only 1 connected client.

I've been at this for 8 hours already and I can't figure this out. Please someone help me with this, I'm going crazy over here. This is the code I have so far:

Client

int main(int argc, char* argv[]){
int pPedido;
pPedido = open("pedido",O_WRONLY);
char buffer[6] = "ABCDE";
write(pPedido,buffer,6);
printf("FECHOU\n");
return 0;
}

Server

int main(int argc, char* argv[]){
int exists = 0;
int pipeID[2];
int pPedido;
char buffer [100];
mkfifo("pedido",0666);

while(1){
    pPedido = open("pedido",O_RDONLY);
    read(pPedido,buffer,6);

    if(exists == 1){
        write(pipeID[1],"ABC",4);
    }
    else{
        pipe(pipeID);
        if(fork() == 0){
            char bufferzito[100];
            while(1){
                read(pipeID[0],bufferzito,4);
                printf("%s\n",bufferzito);
            }
        }
        else{
            write(pipeID[1],"ABC",4);
            exists = 1;
        }
    }
}
return 0;
}

These are the includes I used. I think some of them are not necessary though.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <string.h>
share|improve this question
    
Please note: I edited your post to format the includes prettily. To do this, I modified the first one from the literal 'stdio' that you had posted, to #include <stdio.h>. I added the .h under the assumption that your code would not have compiled, but if you actually have #include <stdio> in your code please rollback the edit! –  savanto May 30 at 23:43
    
When reading from pipes, read() may return before everything is read. Instead of sending "ABC" from parent to child, why not send what you have read from the pipe to the child process. This way you'll know if the message from client is split in 2 reads. –  alvits May 31 at 1:30

2 Answers 2

You are not checking the return value from open or from read. Both of these functions can return -1 to indicate an error.

Probably what is happening is that on the second iteration of the server while loop, either the open or the read returns immediately with a return value of -1 (an error) so your loop executes again.

After calling read or open, check the return value, and also check errno if it returned -1.

You are also opening the same fifo again and again on each iteration of the loop, without ever closing it.

share|improve this answer

I have tested the following solution and it works.

The problem seems to be that client is exiting without closing the pipe.

Somehow this results in a second read that is writing 0 bytes to the buffer. Getting 0 as the return value on read means EOF according to the documentation. I'm not sure why we are not getting the second read the first time the client is connecting.

To handle this situation you can do one of the two things. You probably should do both of them though.

On the server side check the return value of the read call

...
int n = read(pPedido,buffer,6);
if(n==0) continue;
...

On the client side close the pipe before exiting

...
printf("FECHOU\n");
close (pPedido);
return 0;

Either one by itself will fix the problem. But I'd recommend doing both.

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