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I am trying to use getc(character) to take an element from a file and do stuff with it, but it appears that it must have a '\n' before the end of a line is met.

How can I remove this so that when I copy the characters I don't have a new line charachter appearing anywhere - thus allowing me to deal with printing new lines when I choose?

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Could this be homework? – Dirk Eddelbuettel Mar 7 '10 at 14:45
    
no it isn't, i always say in my posts when i am doing homework – Biscuit128 Mar 7 '10 at 14:46
2  
loz: Code Please!?! Not fair to be downvoting everyone's answer without us knowing..... – t0mm13b Mar 7 '10 at 14:57
2  
@tommieb75 : loz didn't downvote (he's still at 0 and learning how SO works) – lexu Mar 7 '10 at 15:03
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Hmm, wouldn't help to use getc to fill a buffer and remove newline and carriage return characters?

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If he's using getc anyway, yeah it's probably smartest to just not copy the character into the buffer when doing that. – JUST MY correct OPINION Mar 7 '10 at 15:01
.
.
.
#include <string.h>
.
. /* insert stuff here */
.
char* mystring = "THIS IS MY STRING\n"
char* deststring;
.
.
.
strncpy(deststring, mystring, strlen(mystring)-1);
.
.
.

(As an added note, I'm not a huge fan of dropping \0 characters in strings like that. It doesn't work well when you start doing i18n and the character width is not fixed. UTF-8, for example, can use anywhere from 1 to 4 bytes per "character".)

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You could replace it with a null terminator.

Here is one (simple) way to do it off the top of my head:

 mystr[ strlen(mystr) - 1 ] = '\0';
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shouldn't you verify that the char is a lf before nuking it? – lexu Mar 7 '10 at 14:54
    
Works fine until your employer decides to internationalize and your strings become UTF-8 encoded. – JUST MY correct OPINION Mar 7 '10 at 14:54
    
Right, but your solution has the same problem. Typically you would need to use a different set of functions other than the str* series in order to deal with unicode. For example, using wcscpy instead of strcpy for Win32 programming. In any case, it was just a quick example. – Justin Ethier Mar 7 '10 at 15:07
    
@lexu - Do you mean the code should check to see that the char being replaced is a newline? Yes, that would probably be a good idea. However, all of the solutions more or less assume that his code is doing that check already. – Justin Ethier Mar 7 '10 at 15:10
    
That's what Kernighan & Pike suggested as idiomatic--in their The Practice of Programming p 26 – RainDoctor Sep 23 '14 at 21:55

To replace all new line char with spaces, use:

char *pch = strstr(myStr, "\n");
while(pch != NULL)
{
    strncpy(pch, " ", 1);
    pch = strstr(myStr, "\n");
}

To remove first occurrence of new line char in string, use:

char *pch = strstr(myStr, "\n");
if(pch != NULL)
  strncpy(pch, "\0", 1);
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please add a description of what your code does. – Hector Feb 2 at 14:31
1  
@Hector, now, I have added description. – NTN Feb 3 at 4:55

Supposing that buf is of type char and it holds the string value read in from the file...

buf[strlen(buf)-1] = '\0';

That sets the second-last character of the buffer to nul i.e. '\0' in order to remove the new-line character.

Edit: Since loz mentioned a compiler error I suspect it's a const char * is used...Can we see the code please...

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this gives an error saying passing arg 1 of strlen makes pointer from integer without a cast – Biscuit128 Mar 7 '10 at 14:53
    
shouldn't you verify that the char is a lf before nuking it? – lexu Mar 7 '10 at 14:53
    
Well....the poster did not post code here....so it's difficult to say.... – t0mm13b Mar 7 '10 at 14:54
    
Works fine until your employer decides to internationalize and your strings become UTF-8 encoded. – JUST MY correct OPINION Mar 7 '10 at 14:55
    
Who downvoted this? We're shooting ourselves in the foot if loz did not post code...how are we supposed to know... – t0mm13b Mar 7 '10 at 14:59

The following will do the trick

line[strlen(line) - 1] = 0
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