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I need to convert int datafield to nvarchar with leading zeros

example:

1 convert to '001'

867 convert to '000867', etc.

thx.


This is my response 4 Hours later ...

I tested this T-SQL Script and work fine for me !

DECLARE @number1 INT, @number2 INT

SET @number1 = 1

SET @number2 = 867

SELECT RIGHT('000' + CAST(@number1 AS NCHAR(3)), 3 ) AS NUMBER_CONVERTED

SELECT RIGHT('000000' + CAST(@number2 AS NCHAR(6)), 6 ) AS NUMBER_CONVERTED

I created this user function

T-SQL Code :

CREATE FUNCTION CIntToChar(@intVal BIGINT, @intLen Int) RETURNS nvarchar(20)
AS
BEGIN

    -- BIGINT = 2^63-1 (9,223,372,036,854,775,807) Max size number

    -- @intlen contains the string size to return
    IF @intlen > 20
       SET @intlen = 20

    RETURN REPLICATE('0',@intLen-LEN(RTRIM(CONVERT(nvarchar(20),@intVal)))) 
        + CONVERT(nvarchar(20),@intVal)

END

Example :

SELECT dbo.CIntToChar( 867, 6 ) AS COD_ID

OUTPUT

000867

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13 Answers 13

Use REPLICATE so you don't have to hard code all the leading zeros:

DECLARE @InputStr int
       ,@Size     int
SELECT @InputStr=123
      ,@Size=10

PRINT REPLICATE('0',@Size-LEN(RTRIM(CONVERT(varchar(8000),@InputStr)))) + CONVERT(varchar(8000),@InputStr)

OUTPUT:

0000000123
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Try this: select right('00000' + cast(Your_Field as varchar(5)), 5)

It will get the result in 5 digits, ex: 00001,...., 01234

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You can also use FORMAT() function introduced in SQL Server 2012. http://technet.microsoft.com/library/hh213505.aspx

DECLARE @number1 INT, @number2 INT

SET @number1 = 1
SET @number2 = 867

SELECT FORMAT(@number1, 'd10')
SELECT FORMAT(@number2, 'd10')
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1  
:) for SQL Server 2012 –  RicardoBalda Aug 26 '13 at 3:46
    
I will concur on the SQL2012, but for those SQL 2008r2 and older, my solution will get the result –  GoldBishop Feb 21 at 21:33

Not to High-Jack this question but the note needs to be made that you need to use (N)VARCHAR instead of (N)CHAR data-type.

RIGHT('000' + CAST(@number1 AS NCHAR(3)), 3 )

Above segment, will not produce the correct response from SQL 2005

RIGHT('000' + CAST(@number1 AS NVARCHAR(3)), 3 )

Above segment, will produce the desired response from SQL 2005

The the varchar will provide you with the desired prefix length on the fly. Where as the fixed length data type will require length designation and adjustments.

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Data type "int" cannot be more than 10 digits, additionally the "Len()" function works on ints, so there's no need to convert the int to a string before calling the len() function.

Lastly, you are not taking into account the case where the size of your int > the total number of digits you want it padded to (@intLen).

Therefore, a more concise / correct solution is:

CREATE FUNCTION rf_f_CIntToChar(@intVal Int, @intLen Int) RETURNS nvarchar(10)
AS
BEGIN
    IF @intlen > 20 SET @intlen = 20
    IF @intlen < LEN(@intVal) RETURN RIGHT(CONVERT(nvarchar(10), @intVal), @intlen)
    RETURN REPLICATE('0', @intLen - LEN(@intVal)) + CONVERT(nvarchar(10), @intVal)
END
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I found a good article here:

Padding a string with leading zeros

I've need to do this a lot of times when outputing a fixed length data export where for instance a numeric column is 9 characters long and you need to prefix with leading 0's.

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    select right('000' + convert(varchar(3),id),3) from table

    example
    declare @i int
    select @i =1

select right('000' + convert(varchar(3),@i),3)

BTW if it is an int column then it will still not keep the zeros Just do it in the presentation layer or if you really need to in the SELECT

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Had same issue, this is how I resolved... Simple and elegant. The "4" is how long the string should be, no matter what length of integer is passed it will pad with zero's up to "4".

STUFF(SomeVariableOrField,1,0,REPLICATE('0',4 - LEN(SomeVariableOrField)))
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I like to use

DECLARE @Length int
DECLARE @Number int
SET @Length = 9
SET @Number = 4

select right( POWER(10, @Length) + @Number, @Length)

this gives me

000000004
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DECLARE @number1 INT, @number2 INT

SET @number1 = 1

SET @number2 = 867

-- Without the 'RTRIM', the value returned is 3__ !!!

SELECT RIGHT('000' + RTRIM(CAST(@number1 AS NCHAR(3)), 3 )) AS NUMBER_CONVERTED

-- Without the 'RTRIM', the value returned is 867___ !!!

SELECT RIGHT('000000' + RTRIM(CAST(@number2 AS NCHAR(6)), 6 )) AS NUMBER_CONVERTED
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This work for me in MYSQL:

FUNCTION leadingZero(format VARCHAR(255), num VARCHAR(255))
  RETURNS varchar(255) CHARSET utf8
BEGIN
  return CONCAT(SUBSTRING(format,1,LENGTH(format)-LENGTH(num)),num);
END

For example:

leadingZero('000',999); returns '999'
leadingZero('0000',999); returns '0999'
leadingZero('xxxx',999); returns 'x999'

Hope this will help. Grettings

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Using RIGHT is a good option but you can also do the following:

SUBSTRING(CAST((POWER(10, N) + value) AS NVARCHAR(N + 1)), 2, N)

where N is the total number of digits you want displayed. So for a 3-digit value with leading zeros (N = 3):

SUBSTRING(CAST((POWER(10, 3) + value) AS NVARCHAR(4)), 2, 3)

or alternately

SUBSTRING(CAST(1000 + value) AS NVARCHAR(4)), 2, 3)

What this is doing is adding the desired value to a power of 10 large enough to generate enough leading zeros, then chopping off the leading 1.

The advantage of this technique is that the result will always be the same length, allowing the use of SUBSTRING instead of RIGHT, which is not available in some query languages (like HQL).

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I was wondering, would this be on any use to you?

declare @val int,@len=800
select replace(str(@val,@len),' ','0')
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