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I want to display a success msg after finishing an Ajax call. I tried to do the following:

$("form.stock").submit(function(){
   $.post('/ajax/transactionupdate', params, function(data) {
     $this.append("success");
   }
});

The problem is that inside the callback function, it seems like $(this) is unknown (not part of the instance).

So I tried to use ajaxComplete / ajaxSuccess as follows but for some reason they are not even initiated once the ajax is finished:

 $(this).ajaxComplete(function() {
        alert("STOP");
  });

However, the ajaxStart does seem to work:

  $(this).ajaxStart(function() {
        alert("START");
  });

Can anyone notice whats the problem?

Thanks! Joel

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted
$("form.stock").submit(function(e){
   e.preventDefault()
   var el = this;
   $.post('/ajax/transactionupdate', params, function(data) {
     $(el).append("success");
   }
});

The context is the window since the XMLHttpRequest method is owned by window and that internally is invoked by $.post.

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Great!! It works, thank you very much –  Joel Mar 7 '10 at 19:43

First, that initial example could be re-done like this:

$("form.stock").submit(function() {
  var stockForm = $(this);
  $.post('/ajax/transactionupdate', params, function(data) {
   stockForm.append("success");
  });
  return false;
});

You should return false from the "submit" handler to prevent the "native" form submit from happening.

share|improve this answer
    
Also working, thanks for the info about the "native" submittion –  Joel Mar 7 '10 at 19:43
    
Returning false and calling that "preventDefault()" routine on the event object will have the same effect for you. (Actually returning false will also have the effect of calling "stopPropagation", which for a form "submit()" routine isn't super-interesting because you'd rarely have nested forms.) –  Pointy Mar 7 '10 at 21:09

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