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I am looking in R for a function partial.sum() which takes a vector of numbers and returns an ascending sorted vector of all partial sums:

test=c(2,5,10)
partial.sum(test)

# 2 5 7 10 12 15 17
## 2 is the sum of element 2
## 5 is the sum of element 5    
## 7 is the sum of elements 2 & 5    
## 10 is the sum of element 10    
## 12 is the sum of elements 2 & 10    
## 15 is the sum of elements 5 & 10
## 17 is the sum of elements 2 & 5 & 10
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1  
have you tried things –  rawr May 31 '14 at 19:24
    
I think you missed 12. And I take it you're ignoring the partial sum that doesn't include any elements (0). –  Dason May 31 '14 at 19:29
    
Thx, forgot the 12. I amended the question accordingly. The 0 elements solution is not requested. –  user2030503 May 31 '14 at 19:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Here is one using recursion. (Not making claims about it being efficient either)

partial.sum <- function(x) {
   slave <- function(x) {
      if (length(x)) {
         y <- Recall(x[-1])
         c(y + 0, y + x[1])
      } else 0
   }
   sort(unique(slave(x)[-1]))
}

partial.sum(c(2,5,10))
# [1]  2  5  7 10 12 15 17

Edit: well, turns out it is a little faster than I thought:

x <- 1:20
microbenchmark(flodel(x), dason(x), matthew(x), times = 10)
# Unit: milliseconds
#        expr        min        lq     median        uq       max neval
#   flodel(x)   86.31128   86.9966   94.12023  125.1013  163.5824    10
#    dason(x) 2407.27062 2461.2022 2633.73003 2846.2639 3031.7250    10
#  matthew(x) 3084.59227 3191.7810 3304.36064 3693.8595 3883.2767    10

(I added sort and/or unique to dason and matthew's functions where appropriate for fair comparison.)

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I kind of want to write a version that uses iterators so there isn't the cost of recursion or using expand.grid to create a huge object upfront... –  Dason May 31 '14 at 19:57
    
I'd love to see that, please do. –  flodel May 31 '14 at 20:01
    
flodel(1:3) gives 1:6 (which IIUC is wrong), whereas dason(1:3) gives c(1,2,3,3,4,5,6) (and this is right). –  Arun May 31 '14 at 20:46
    
@Arun, that's your interpretation and we're just talking about adding or removing unique to one or the other's code, come on... –  flodel May 31 '14 at 20:50
    
Oh the result just has to have unique values, is it? Sorry, dint get that from the Q. –  Arun May 31 '14 at 20:53

This probably doesn't scale too well and doesn't account for possible duplicates in the input vector or duplicates in the answer. You can use unique later if that is a concern for you.

partial.sum <- function(x){
  n <- length(x)
  # Something that will help get us every possible subset
  # of the original vector
  out <- do.call(expand.grid, replicate(n, c(T,F), simplify = F))
  # Don't include the case where we don't grab any elements
  out <- head(out, -1)

  # ans <- apply(out, 1, function(row){sum(x[row])})
  # As flodel points out the following will be faster than
  # the previous line
  ans <- data.matrix(out) %*% x
  # If you want only unique value then add a call to unique here
  ans <- sort(unname(ans))
  ans
}
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2  
I was writing essentially the same answer. Except I think a matrix multiplication will be a lot faster: ans <- sort(unique(data.matrix(out) %*% x)) –  flodel May 31 '14 at 19:38
    
@flodel Good point! I'll make that change. –  Dason May 31 '14 at 19:46

Here's an iterative approach using combn to produce combinations to sum. It works for vectors of of length greater than 1.

partial.sum <- function(x) {
  sort(unique(unlist(sapply(seq_along(x), function(i) colSums(combn(x,i))))))
}
## [1]  2  5  7 10 12 15 17

To handle lengths less than 2, test for the length:

partial.sum <- function(x) {
  if (length(x) > 1) {
    sort(unique(unlist(sapply(seq_along(x), function(i) colSums(combn(x,i))))))
  } else {
    x
  }
}

Some timings, out of rbenchmark, which don't entirely agree with flodel's results. I modified Dason's code, removing the comments and adding a call to unique. The version of my code is the first, without the if. flodel's code is a clear winner here.

> test <- 1:10
> benchmark(matthew(test), flodel(test), dason(test), replications=100)
           test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child
3   dason(test)          100   0.180   12.857     0.175    0.004          0         0
2  flodel(test)          100   0.014    1.000     0.015    0.000          0         0
1 matthew(test)          100   0.244   17.429     0.242    0.001          0         0

> test <- 1:20
> benchmark(matthew(test), flodel(test), dason(test), replications=1)
           test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child
3   dason(test)            1   5.231   98.698     5.158    0.058          0         0
2  flodel(test)            1   0.053    1.000     0.053    0.000          0         0
1 matthew(test)            1   2.184   41.208     2.180    0.000          0         0

> test <- 1:25
> benchmark(matthew(test), flodel(test), dason(test), replications=1)
           test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child
3   dason(test)            1 288.957  163.345   264.068   23.859          0         0
2  flodel(test)            1   1.769    1.000     1.727    0.038          0         0
1 matthew(test)            1  75.712   42.799    74.745    0.847          0         0
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You need to handle the case where length(x) == 1, blame combn. –  flodel May 31 '14 at 20:27
    
It is faster than Dason's for 20 elements (removing the comments, and adding unique to both). –  Matthew Lundberg May 31 '14 at 20:33
    
not on my machine. –  flodel May 31 '14 at 20:36
1  
maybe matrix multiplication is slow on your machine, consider changing your blas if you are interested and never looked into it. –  flodel May 31 '14 at 20:46
1  
@Arun I added a call to unique to remove the duplicate. Remove unique and you'll get two 3's. –  Matthew Lundberg May 31 '14 at 20:52

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