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I'm trying to do some variable expansion in bash but somehow the result is truncated/rotated. Here's a sample my code:

x="no-cabac,level=3,ref=3,bframes=0,subme=0,weightp=0"
tts="{$x}"
echo $tts

This prints: }no-cabac,level=3,ref=3,bframes=0,subme=0,weightp=0

I expected: {no-cabac,level=3,ref=3,bframes=0,subme=0,weightp=0}

If I change tts to tts=abc{$x}qwe the output is }qweno-cabac,level=3,ref=3,bframes=0,subme=0,weightp=0

I tried escaping the braces and removing the quotes, still doesn't work. I know there's something that has to be escaped but I can't figure out what.

bash --version output: GNU bash, version 3.2.48(21)-release (i686-pc-cygwin)

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That works fine for me with GNU bash, version 3.2.48(1)-release (x86_64-apple-darwin10.0) –  R Samuel Klatchko Mar 7 '10 at 19:42
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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're getting your $x from somewhere else, and it has a \r at the end. Try:

tts="{${x/$'\r'/}}"
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Thanks, that was it. I had my script file with CRLFs, therefore the extra \r :-/ –  Mauricio Scheffer Mar 7 '10 at 19:56
    
BTW I converted to LF and the original script worked just fine. –  Mauricio Scheffer Mar 7 '10 at 20:26
2  
Just a diagnostic tip: pipe a variable value (or any string) to | od -a to see a character-by-character representation of it with whitespace and control characters showing with symbolic names. For instance, a \r shows as cr, \n as nl, \t as ht. –  mklement0 Jun 12 '12 at 13:50
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