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I'm working with Infineon's XMC4500 Relax Kit and I'm trying to extract the firmware through a single GPIO pin.

My very naive idea is to dump one bit at a time through the GPIO pin and somehow "sniff" the data with a logic analyzer.

Pseudocode:

while(word by word memory copy hasn't finished)
  ...
  register = value;
  temp_value = value AND 0x1;
  pin = temp_value;
  value = value >> 1;
  ...

Am I on the right track? Does anybody have a better/nicer idea how to archive this?

### EDIT ###

Actually a requirement of my (shell)code would be that it needs to be really tiny. I found this nifty trick on how to dump firmware by blinking the LEDs.

However I'm struggling to receive correct values with Saleae Logic Analyzer.

Basically what I'm doing is:

  1. Setup the GPIO pin directions to output
  2. Blink LED1 (pin 1.1) with a clock (SPI serial clock)
  3. Blink LED2 (pin 1.0) with data bits (SPI MOSI)
  4. Sniff pins with a logic analyzer

Here's my C code:

#include "XMC4500.h"

#define DEL 1260

void init() 
{
  // P1.0 output, push pull
  PORT1->IOCR0 = 0x80UL << 0;
  // P1.1 output, push pull
  PORT1->IOCR0 |= 0x80UL << 8;
}

void delay(int i) { 
  while(--i) { 
    asm("nop\n"); 
    asm("nop\n"); 
  } 
}

// Sets a pin to high
// P1.0 = SPI MOSI
// P1.1 = SPI CLOCK
void output_high(int i) {
  // P1.0 high
  if(i == 0) {
    PORT1->OUT |= 0x1UL;  
  }

  // P1.1 high
  if(i == 1) {
    PORT1->OUT |= 0x2UL;
  } 
}

// Sets a pin to low
// P1.0 = SPI MOSI
// P1.1 = SPI CLOCK
void output_low(int i) {
  // P1.0 low
  if(i == 0) {
    PORT1->OUT &= (~0x1UL);
  }

  // P1.1 low
  if(i == 1) {
    PORT1->OUT &= (~0x2UL);
  }
}

// SPI bit banging
void spi_send_byte(unsigned char data)
{
  int i;

  // Send bits 7..0
  for (i = 0; i < 8; i++)
  {
    // Sets P1.1 to low (serial clock)
    output_low(1);

    // Consider leftmost bit
    // Set line high if bit is 1, low if bit is 0
    if (data & 0x80)
      // Sets P1.0 to high (MOSI)
      output_high(0);
    else
      // Sets P1.0 to low (MOSI)
      output_low(0);

    delay(DEL);

    // Sets P1.1 to high (Serial Clock)
    output_high(1);

    // Shift byte left so next bit will be leftmost
    data <<= 1;
  }
}

int main() {
  init();

  while(1) {
    spi_send_byte('t');
    spi_send_byte('e');
    spi_send_byte('s');
    spi_send_byte('t');
  }

  return 0;
}

### 2nd EDIT ###

Dumping flash memory is working fine with the following code:

#include "XMC4500.h"

// SPI bit banging
void spi_send_word(uint32_t data)
{
  int i;

  // LSB first, 32 bits per transfer
  for (i = 0; i < 32; i++)
  {
    // set pin 1.1 to low (SPI clock)
    PORT1->OUT &= (~0x2UL);

    // set line high if bit is 1, low if bit is 0
    if (data & 0x1) {
      // set pin 1.0 to high (SPI MOSI)
      PORT1->OUT |= 0x1UL;
    }
    else {
      // set pin 1.0 to low (SPI MOSI)
      PORT1->OUT &= (~0x1UL);   
    }

    // set pin 1.1 to high (SPI clock)
    PORT1->OUT |= 0x2UL;

    data >>= 1;
  }
}

int main() {
  // start dumping at memory address 0x08000000
  unsigned int *p;
  p = (uint32_t *)(0x08000000u);

  // configure pin 1.0 and pin 1.1 as output (push-pull)
  PORT1->IOCR0 = 0x8080UL;

  while(1) {
    spi_send_word(*p);
    p++;
  }
}
share|improve this question
    
Can you post a visual analyzer plot of a single character? You may find that sigrok is better front end than salae's if you are going to do custom processing. Personally, I'd join Clifford in recommending you send ordinary asynchronous serial data, which you can capture with a serial port or cheap USB-serial converter - chances are you transmit only into one which expect RS232 level merely by inverting the sense of your transmit data, as the line driver would, even sending only 3.3v or 5v signals. –  Chris Stratton Jun 4 '14 at 18:14
    
Finally I was successful in dumping memory through a single pin. See working code above. –  user3696425 Jun 10 '14 at 17:28

2 Answers 2

The biggest problem with your solution is recovering the timing information - knowing where one word starts and another ends. It would be simpler to output the data on a UART tx pin - the UART adds start and stop bits and manages timing for you, and the output can be read directly via a regular PC serial port.

If you cannot use a UART, emulating a UART by bit-banging the GPIO with UART timing will still allow a conventional serial port to be used to receive the data directly.

An example software UART implementation can be found here. In your case of course you need only the transmit capability.

share|improve this answer

That might work decently depending on your requirements. Something to consider will be if there are any timing variations at all while looping through the data such as flash read times varying, cache stuff, etc you will run into a problem figuring out where bytes start and stop. You might want to take a look at the 1-Wire protocol:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1-Wire

You don't have to implement it to spec or anything, just take a look at it for an idea. If you implement something like that your logic is just as simple:

while(word by word memory copy hasn't finished)
  ...
  register = value;
  temp_value = value AND 0x1;
  one_wire_send(temp_value);
  value = value >> 1;
  ...
share|improve this answer

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