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I am not able to make this out: Between eliminates use of >= and <=

...but when i tried this query:

SELECT *  
  FROM names 
 WHERE name >= 'Ankit' 
   AND name <= 'P'

...it gives output:

name
------
Ankit
Mac
Bob

When I tried:

SELECT *  
  FROM names  
 WHERE name BETWEEN 'Ankit' AND 'P'

...it gives output:

name
------
Ankit

Can you explain this why?

share|improve this question
    
You're comparing apples with oranges - you've used lowercase p in one and uppercase P in the other. –  Jeffrey Kemp Mar 8 '10 at 2:43
    
common man SQL is case insensitive everybody knows that... –  Ankit Sachan Mar 8 '10 at 5:34
    
No it isn't. But it's true that it wouldn't make any difference to your query - all three names are "less than" both 'p' and 'P'. It seems no one (including me) can replicate your issue; I suggest you post the full create table, insert and select statements to reproduce the problem. Also you could answer Gary's question about the NLS settings (unless the enigmatic "boss sql is case insensitive" is supposed to be an answer to that?) –  Tony Andrews Mar 8 '10 at 10:56
1  
"common man" =/= "come on, man" –  Sathya Mar 8 '10 at 16:10
1  
You have a working query why do you want to change it to use between? Personally I prefer the original syntax to between because people are often confused as to whether it is >= and <= or > and < or some other combination, so you can't know the actual intent of the developer (and whether the query got it correct). Explicitly saying what you want is better in my opinion. –  HLGEM Mar 9 '10 at 14:20

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First, Oracle VARCHAR2 type is case sensitive.

Second, check that you do not have spaces in the beginning of name like this:

" Bob"
" Mac"

Use trim function to check if this causes the problem:

SELECT *  
FROM names  
WHERE trim(name) BETWEEN 'Ankit' AND 'P'

If this does not help, check that language and sort order are correct for your database.

Edit:
Since above advice did not solve your problem, you could try following:

  1. Maybe you have some other non-printable characters in field. Use Oracle DUMP function to check:

    SELECT DUMP(name), name FROM names
    

    You should get something like this:

    Typ=1 Len=3: 66,111,98   Bob
    ...
    

    Verify that Len is correct length.

  2. Check NLS parameters so that they are not inadvertently changed to something that does not work for your database:

    SELECT * FROM NLS_SESSION_PARAMETERS
    SELECT * FROM NLS_DATABASE_PARAMETERS
    SELECT * FROM NLS_INSTANCE_PARAMETERS
    

    Check results of these three queries and verify that parameters on sort, language and character set are correct.

share|improve this answer
    
i checked no spaces at beginning....... –  Ankit Sachan Mar 10 '10 at 3:38

I'm quite certain this has nothing to do with your syntax and everything to do with your DB setup. I've recreated your test scenario and, like others, have no problem with either query returning the results you expect. Did you check your NLS_SESSION_PARAMETERS as mentioned earlier?

share|improve this answer

SQL code is case insensitive. String values and string comparisons are case sensitive.

See for yourself:

SELECT CASE WHEN 'a' = 'A' THEN 'string comparison is case insensitive'
            WHEN 'a' <> 'A' THEN 'string comparison is case sensitive'
       END 
FROM dual;
share|improve this answer
    
Depends on the database. Oracle and DB2 are case sensitive. SQL Server and mySQL are insensitive. –  redcayuga Mar 9 '10 at 14:15
    
And even SQL Server can be case sensitive if the collation options are changed (or be case insensitive, but using a difficult language setting like Turkish where i and I are different letters). –  David Mar 9 '10 at 14:19
    
I gave you an upvote because your code illustrates the comparison nicely. –  redcayuga Mar 9 '10 at 14:40

You seem to have used a lowercase 'p' in the top query and an uppercase 'P' in the second. Was this intentional?

share|improve this answer
2  
Might have that effect with some NLS settings. It would be interesting to see the results from : select * from NLS_SESSION_PARAMETERS where parameter in ('NLS_LANGUAGE','NLS_SORT','NLS_COMP'); –  Gary Myers Mar 7 '10 at 22:43
    
boss sql is case insensitive –  Ankit Sachan Mar 8 '10 at 3:42
SELECT *  
FROM names  
WHERE name BETWEEN 'Ankit' AND 'P'

also should return all three rows - I just verified that it does so using your example. Are you sure that you made the test correctly? Maybe you inserted data in other session and didn't commit additional rows?

share|improve this answer
    
I tried the same way you have tried –  Ankit Sachan Mar 8 '10 at 3:42

Nut 100% sure about it, but as it's only 3 rows, you could try it:

SELECT *  
  FROM names  
 WHERE (name BETWEEN "Ankit" AND "P")
OR (name BETWEEN "ankit" AND "p")
share|improve this answer
    
This query will never return a row, you want an "OR": WHERE (name BETWEEN "Ankit" AND "P") OR (name BETWEEN "ankit" AND "p") –  redcayuga Mar 9 '10 at 14:13
    
lol, thanks redcayuga :) –  Ervin Mar 9 '10 at 16:06

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