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The GCC compiler complains (see below) when I try the following. class Face needs to be incomplete because it contains pointer to class Element which similarly contains pointer to class Face. In other words, there is a circular dependency among classes. How can I fix it?

error: invalid application of ‘sizeof’ to incomplete type ‘Face’

class Face; // needs to be incomplete

class Element
{
    std::vector < std::unique_ptr <Face> > face;
};

class Face
{
    std::vector < std::unique_ptr <Element> > elm;
};
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3  
Umm, you didn't define class Face? –  awesomeyi Jun 1 '14 at 20:17
1  
You might want to read this: home.roadrunner.com/~hinnant/incomplete.html –  shuttle87 Jun 1 '14 at 20:17
    
@stefan : look at the circular dependency between the types. This reason could have been highlighted in the question though. –  Csq Jun 1 '14 at 20:37
    
You can use incomplete types with shared and raw pointers. –  OMGtechy Jun 1 '14 at 20:43
1  
What is the error that you're getting? I compiled your code on my mac and I didn't get any error. –  Spundun Jun 1 '14 at 21:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

One way to fix this is to declare the destructors and constructors of Element and Face but not define them in the header. Then you need to define them in cpp files.

(More technical details can be found in the answers to my question there: Is std::unique_ptr<T> required to know the full definition of T?)

The source of the problem is that the destructor of unique_ptr needs to call delete (by default) therefore it needs to know the definition of the type (to have it's size). But if the destructor of Element and Face is generated automatically, then it will be inlined by default: the code using Element and Face instances will be forced to know the size of both types so that their destructors can call unique_ptr destructor which can call delete with the type associated to the pointer.

The solution I gave will make sure the construction and destruction of the unique_ptr are defiend in a separate cpp. They will not be inlined but they are still callable by the code using Element and Face. The destructor code of the unique_ptrs will be in the cpp where the destructors of Element and Face are defined, so in these cpp the definition of both will be needed.

To take your example:

//header
class Face; // needs to be incomplete

class Element
{
public:
    Element(); // don't define it here
    ~Element(); // don't define it here
private:
    std::vector < std::unique_ptr <Face> > face;
};

class Face
{
public:
    Face(); // don't define it here
    ~Face(); // don't define it here
private:
    std::vector < std::unique_ptr <Element> > elm;
};

// cpp 
#include "header"
// if you want the default impl (C++11)
Element::Element() = default; 
Element::~Element() = default; 

Face::Face() = default; 
Face::~Face() = default; 

In case they are in different header/cpp pair, it's still the same solution. However you have to do more forward declare and the cpp files defining the construction/destruction have to include all the necessary headers:

//element.h
class Face; // needs to be incomplete

class Element
{
public:
    Element(); // don't define it here
    ~Element(); // don't define it here
private:
    std::vector < std::unique_ptr <Face> > face;
};

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// face.h
class Element; // needs to be incomplete

class Face
{
public:
    Face(); // don't define it here
    ~Face(); // don't define it here
private:
    std::vector < std::unique_ptr <Element> > elm;
};

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// element.cpp 
#include "element.h"
#include "face.h" // necessary to allow the unique_ptr destructor to call delete

// if you want the default impl (C++11)
Element::Element() = default; 
Element::~Element() = default; 

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// face.cpp 
#include "element.h" // necessary to allow the unique_ptr destructor to call delete
#include "face.h" 

// if you want the default impl (C++11)
Face::Face() = default; 
Face::~Face() = default; 
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What if Face and Element have their own header and cpp files? –  Shibli Jun 2 '14 at 5:03
    
@Shibli Same answer, but then you just have to forward-declare Element for Face and Face for Element. I'll add an example. –  Klaim Jun 2 '14 at 7:53
    
@Shibli Done, is the second example clear enough? –  Klaim Jun 2 '14 at 8:00

Object that is element of a std::vector has to be copied (in C++03, or has move semantics in C++11) by vector and default constructed. unique_ptr guarantees that a single unique_ptr has ownership of the held pointer. This means that you can't make copies of a unique_ptr (because then two unique_ptrs would have ownership), so you can only move it.

Move assignment semantics for unique pointer std::unique_ptr <Face>

operator=( P&&)

requires that type Face is complete.

To fix this you should define a custom deleter or declare destructor for Face in .h file and define it in .cpp.

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