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I have an anchor with a pretty big hit area that also has a select dropdown within it that shouldn't activate the link when the select is clicked. I know this probably isn't "to spec" but I need the functionality that the anchor gives (i.e., cmd-click opens in new browser tab) and don't know of any other way.

Here's the general outline of what I have:

<a id="anchor" href="http://google.com" onclick="anchor(event)">
  <div id="div">
    <select id="select" onclick="select(event)">
      <option>Option A</option>
      <option>Option B</option>
      <option>Option C</option>
     </select>
  </div>
</a>

Here's a fiddle that generally shows what I'm trying to do:

http://jsfiddle.net/C3g6b/

However, this isn't a good way to test this because fiddle doesn't let you follow links, so you never really know what's going on. I would suggest pasting this stand-alone into a browser:

http://pastebin.com/cvSBFAM8

The problem is that whenever I click on the select it will follow the anchor. I have tried using various stopPropagation and preventDefault within the (now bare) functions but I can't get anything to work. Obviously, I still want the anchor to work when you're not clicking the dropdown.

To make it worse, I can get it to mostly work in chrome but it doesn't work in firefox (haven't really tested IE or others). It seems to bring up the select on the first click but then the preventDefault() I use breaks everything else.

Any suggestions, even if greatly different than what I have but achieves the same thing, would be appreciated. Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Could you just give the inner elements an href="#" – David Corbin Jun 1 '14 at 23:19
1  
@DavidCorbin: Why would you give non-<a> elements an href attribute? It doesn't have any meaning on <option> or <select> or <div> elements. – Felix Kling Jun 1 '14 at 23:22
3  
<a> elements are not allowed to contain other a elements, buttons, inputs, selects or text areas. You can use another parent and close the a outside the select. – kennebec Jun 1 '14 at 23:24
1  
Will the "div" have predefined area? You could change layout and use two sibling elements a(as block) and the div itself, making the first one position:absolute with the same size – miguel-svq Jun 1 '14 at 23:26
2  
problem is bad and invalid design, not how to prevent bubbling – charlietfl Jun 1 '14 at 23:28

Can you move the <select> outside the <a> in the DOM, and use CSS to make them overlap? You could put them both in a box with relative positioning to keep them grouped; here's a demo: http://jsfiddle.net/C3g6b/4/.


(Original answer: only works in Chrome)

Your handlers aren't being called because you have JSFiddle set to call your JavaScript onload, which means everything is wrapped in a function, which means function declarations are scoped to that function and not available on the global scope. Fix this by either setting JSFiddle not to wrap your JavaScript, or creating the functions like this:

window.select = function () {

Once you've done that, e.preventDefault() should do it.

I should note though that this problem wouldn't have occurred if you were using the recommended method to add event listeners, addEventListener.

share|improve this answer
    
Have you adjust the jsFiddle example and try it yourself? I did and it still didn't work, but maybe I did something wrong. – Felix Kling Jun 2 '14 at 0:58
    
@FelixKling Yes, here's an edit. – twhb Jun 2 '14 at 2:04
    
But now you prevent the select element from changing its value. I increased the width to make it clearer: jsfiddle.net/C3g6b/2. – Felix Kling Jun 2 '14 at 2:37
    
@twberger: Sorry for the misunderstanding, the handlers are called fine. What I meant was that the anchor's href won't be followed because jsfiddle disallows it. Since fiddle disallows it you aren't even able to see the problem. – rjcarr Jun 2 '14 at 4:38
    
@FelixKling: Yes! That shows the problem I mentioned between chrome and firefox. Your example works fine in chrome but doesn't in firefox. How to get this working in firefox? – rjcarr Jun 2 '14 at 5:01

You can use the property e.target to determine where the event originated from. So in the anchor event handler, simply check e.target against the select element and if it matches, you know the user clicked on the select box. That's when you can return false from the handler and prevent the browser from opening the link.

<a id="anchor" href="http://google.com" onclick="return anchor(event)">
  <div id="div">
    <select id="select" onclick="select(event)">
      <option>Option A</option>
      <option>Option B</option>
      <option>Option C</option>
    </select>
  </div>
</a>
function anchor(e) {
  if (e.target == document.getElementById('select')) {
    console.log('Preventing link click');
    return false;
  }
  console.log('Allowing link click');
  return true;
}

function select(e) {
}

An example is at http://jsfiddle.net/mks_ios/8XXrt/. If you open up the Chrome or Firefox Web Console you'll see the log messages.

I used inline event registration here to not deviate from your example, but I'd recommend to stay away from them and register all events in JavaScript. For one, you wouldn't have to explicitly pass event and return the handler's return value in onclick. (See "Don't use it" at http://www.quirksmode.org/js/events_early.html.)

Also, in this problem it really helps to understand the event model and how events propagate between elements. This article is great at explaining it: http://www.quirksmode.org/js/events_order.html.

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