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I have a problem. I want to implement an insertion sort, but on a different types of arrays - int, string and double but I don't know how can I get a different types of parameters in method. Here's some code:

private static string InsertionSort(int[] array)
    {

        Stopwatch stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
        int index, i, j;
        stopwatch.Start();
        for (i = 1; i < array.Length; i++)
        {
            index = array[i];
            j = i;
            while ((j > 0) && (array[j - 1] > index))
            {
                array[j] = array[j - 1];
                j = j - 1;
            }
            array[j] = index;
        }
        stopwatch.Stop();
        return stopwatch.Elapsed.ToString(); 
    }

I tried with InsertionSort(dynamic[] array) but it still doesn't work.

share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted

you can use generics as mentioned by other people, but to be able to compare the items you will need to add a constraint that the type implements IComparable. You will also need to change your code to use CompareTo rather than the > operator.

private static string InsertionSort<T>(T[] array) where T : IComparable<T>
{
    Stopwatch stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
    int i, j;
    T index;
    stopwatch.Start();
    for (i = 1; i < array.Length; i++)
    {
    index = array[i];
    j = i;
    while ((j > 0) && (array[j - 1].CompareTo(index) > 0))
    {
        array[j] = array[j - 1];
        j = j - 1;
    }
    array[j] = index;
    }
    stopwatch.Stop();
    return stopwatch.Elapsed.ToString(); 
}
share|improve this answer
2  
If you are going to go generic, may as well go all the way and use IComparable<T>. This will avoid boxing on the call to CompareTo for value types. – mike z Jun 2 '14 at 7:09
    
yes, good point. I edited the answer – Ned Stoyanov Jun 2 '14 at 7:11

UPDATED after comments

Try using generic method declaration, i.e.

private static string InsertionSort<T>(T[] array) where T : IComparable<T>
{
    Stopwatch stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
    T index;
    int i, j;
    stopwatch.Start();
    for (i = 1; i < array.Length; i++)
    {
        index = array[i];
        j = i;
        while ((j > 0) && (array[j - 1].CompareTo(index) > 0))
        {
            array[j] = array[j - 1];
            j = j - 1;
        }
        array[j] = index;
    }
    stopwatch.Stop();
    return stopwatch.Elapsed.ToString(); 
}

Usage:

int[] intArray = new int[] {5, 23, 6, 8, 3};
string intSortTime = InsertionSort<int>(intArray);

double[] doubleArray = new double[] {5.2, 23.7, 5.0, 5.1, 8,3};
string doubleSortTime = InsertionSort<double>(doubleArray );
share|improve this answer
    
Then > won't work. you may need to update your answer for that also – Sriram Sakthivel Jun 2 '14 at 6:58
2  
Just note that you would need to add a generic constraint that T implemented IComparable and then adjust the code to use the CompareTo method because the > operator will not be defined for all types. – jmcilhinney Jun 2 '14 at 6:58
    
Now I have to parse my values in order to compare them. – Stanimir Yakimov Jun 2 '14 at 6:59
    
@Stanimir Yakimov, I updated my answer. Now you don't have to parse your values in order to compare them. – kpa6uk Jun 2 '14 at 7:20
    
Okey, thank you, now it works. – Stanimir Yakimov Jun 2 '14 at 7:46

Use Generics, you can use the same code for arrays and lists as well: See this Sample code about generic:

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        int[] arr = { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 };
        List<int> list = new List<int>();

        for (int x = 5; x < 10; x++)
        {
            list.Add(x);
        }

        ProcessItems<int>(arr);
        ProcessItems<int>(list);
    }

    static void ProcessItems<T>(IList<T> coll)
    {
        // IsReadOnly returns True for the array and False for the List.
        System.Console.WriteLine
            ("IsReadOnly returns {0} for this collection.",
            coll.IsReadOnly);

        // The following statement causes a run-time exception for the  
        // array, but not for the List. 
        //coll.RemoveAt(4); 

        foreach (T item in coll)
        {
            System.Console.Write(item.ToString() + " ");
        }
        System.Console.WriteLine();
    }
}
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