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You can use arrays with str_replace():

$array_from = array ('from1', 'from2'); 
$array_to = array ('to1', 'to2');

$text = str_replace ($array_from, $array_to, $text);

But what if you have associative array?

$array_from_to = array (
 'from1' => 'to1';
 'from2' => 'to2';
);

How can you use it with str_replace()?
Speed matters - array is big enough.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 23 down vote accepted

$text = strtr($text, $array_from_to)

By the way, that is still a one dimensional "array."

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yep, my bad. changed it –  Qiao Mar 8 '10 at 4:37
    
it is not perfect solution for stated problem (cause lengths should be the same), but it is ideal in my case. And speed is fast. –  Qiao Mar 8 '10 at 4:48
3  
strtr works fine with replacement values that differ in length from the search value. The difference between it and str_replace is that strtr will only do one translation (the longest is matched first), which will be faster (but with different results). E.g., ['ab' => 'c', 'c' => 'd'] will translate 'ab' to 'c', while with str_replace it will become 'd'. –  Matthew Mar 8 '10 at 4:54
    
+1 good solution –  Nicola Peluchetti Feb 22 '12 at 11:08
$array_from_to = array (
    'from1' => 'to1',
    'from2' => 'to2'
);

$text = str_replace(array_keys($array_from_to), $array_from_to, $text);

The to field will ignore the keys in your array. The key function here is array_keys.

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1  
Wow! A very clever use of functions here. Even in 2014 this works beautifully! –  user1383815 May 16 '14 at 5:27
1  
Thank you @user1383815 - time flies: felt like this post just teleported. –  mauris May 16 '14 at 16:17
$keys = array_keys($array);
$values = array_values($array);
$text = str_replace($key, $values, $string);
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$search = array('{user}', '{site}');
$replace = array('Qiao', 'stackoverflow');
$subject = 'Hello {user}, welcome to {site}.';

echo str_replace ($search, $replace, $subject);

Results in Hello Qiao, welcome to stackoverflow..

$array_from_to = array (
    'from1' => 'to1';
    'from2' => 'to2';
);

This is not a two-dimensional array, it's an associative array.

Expanding on the first example, where we place the $search as the keys of the array, and the $replace as it's values, the code would look like this.

$searchAndReplace = array(
    '{user}' => 'Qiao',
    '{site}' => 'stackoverflow'
);

$search = array_keys($searchAndReplace);
$replace = array_value($searchAndReplace);
# Our subject is the same as our first example.

echo str_replace ($search, $replace, $subject);

Results in Hello Qiao, welcome to stackoverflow..

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