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class A:
 def __init__(self):
   print "world"

class B(A):
 def __init__(self):
   print "hello"

B()
hello

In all other languages I've worked with the super constructor is invoked implicitly. How does one invoke it in Python? I would expect super(self) but this doesn't work

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3 Answers

up vote 73 down vote accepted

super() returns a parent-like object in new-style classes:

class A(object):
 def __init__(self):
   print "world"

class B(A):
 def __init__(self):
   print "hello"
   super(B, self).__init__()

B()
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8  
just of curiosity why does super(B,self) require both B and self to be mentioned? isn't this redundant? shouldn't self contain a reference to B already? –  Mike Mar 8 '10 at 4:48
28  
No, because self might actually be an instance of C, a child of B. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Mar 8 '10 at 4:50
    
What if B(A, AA)? I see that super(B,self) returns A, but then how do you get AA? –  iuliux Mar 13 '13 at 15:26
1  
@iuliux: In that case, if self is an instance of B, then super(B, self).__init__() calls the method defined in A and super(A, self).__init__() calls the method defined in AA. If you're writing classes that might be multiply inherited from, you should always include a call to the super constructor, but which code that actually invokes depends on the inheritance decisions of your subclasses. See fuhm.net/super-harmful for more details. –  Daniel Martin Jun 5 '13 at 19:50
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With old-style classes it would be this:

class A: 
 def __init__(self): 
   print "world" 

class B(A): 
 def __init__(self): 
   print "hello" 
   A.__init__(self)
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One way is to call A's constructor and pass self as an argument, like so:

class B(A):
    def __init__(self):
        A.__init__(self)
        print "hello"

The advantage of this style is that it's very clear. It call A's constructor. The downside is that it doesn't handle diamond-shaped inheritance very well, since you may end up calling the shared base class's constructor twice.

Another way is to use super(), as others have shown. For single-inheritance, it does basically the same thing as letting you call the parent's constructor.

However, super() is quite a bit more complicated under-the-hood and can sometimes be counter-intuitive in multiple inheritance situations. On the plus side, super() can be used to handle diamond-shaped inheritance. If you want to know the nitty-gritty of what super() does, the best explanation I've found for how super() works is here (though I'm not necessarily endorsing that article's opinions).

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