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Following example uses Fortran 2003 features for defining unlimited polymorphic pointers and performing actions based on the variable type following a select type construct. The subroutine handleP prints the value of the argument in dependence of it's type.

program example
    implicit none
    type name
        character(22) :: n
    end type

    character(len=7) :: mystring
    mystring = 'Initial'

    call handleP(mystring)
    call handleP('Initial')
    call handleP(name('Initial'))

    contains

        subroutine handleP(p)
            class(*), intent(in) :: p

            select type(p)
            type is (character(len=*))
                write(*,*) len(p), ': ', p
            class is (name)
                write(*,*) len(p%n), ': ', p%n
            class default
                write(*,*) 'Unknown type'
            end select
        end subroutine

end program example

Compiling with gfortran version 4.8 gives following output:

       7 : Initial
       0 :
      22 : Initial

So, with call handleP(mystring) everything works as expected, but with call handleP('Initial') the printing fails. Calling with a type(name) argument also works.

Is the behaviour with call handleP('Initial') a gfortran bug or am I doing something wrong? If it is a bug, what could I do to prevent it?

share|improve this question
    
One of your type guard statements is a syntax error. It uses an assumed length specification (the *) - that has to be deferred length (use a :). If gfortran accepts this then that's a compiler bug. –  IanH Jun 2 '14 at 14:42
    
@IanH Is deferred length true? From F2008 4.4.3.2 "A char-length type parameter value of * has the following meanings... If used in the type-spec of a type guard statement, the associating entity assumes its length from the selector". The NAG documentation also appears to support *. –  francescalus Jun 2 '14 at 19:37
    
You're right - I got my assumed and deferred mixed up. –  IanH Jun 2 '14 at 22:28
    
Thanks for your replies. After some reading on gcc bugzilla, I assume that it is a gfortran bug. Gfortran seems to be not very capable of passing strings with polymorphic pointers yet. –  Holger Jun 6 '14 at 6:52

1 Answer 1

This is probably what you want:

program example
    implicit none
    type name1
        character(22) :: n
    end type

    character(len=7) :: mystring
    mystring = 'Initial'

    call handleP(mystring)
    call handleP('Initial')
    call handleP(name1('Initial'))

    contains

        subroutine handleP(p)
            class(*), intent(in) :: p

            select type(p)
            type is (character(len=*))
                write(*,*) len(p), ': ', p
            class is (name1)
                write(*,*) len(trim(adjustl(p%n))), ': ', p%n
            class default
                write(*,*) 'Unknown type'
            end select
        end subroutine

end program example

The second call doesn't work since 'Initial' is not a variable. The 22 before was just the length which you defined in the type declaration. So I adjusted the length of it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your reply. But my questions was more on the second case. Now I'm quite sure that passing 'Initial' to handleP should be possible, because for real and integer numbers it works as well. –  Holger Jun 6 '14 at 6:47
    
Right, sorry for the confusion. Actually you are right. I just tried it. The intel compiler gives what you expected. B.t.w. with the PGI compiler I only get a Segmentation fault. –  PeMa Jun 6 '14 at 10:28

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