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I have a database of 30mb size, and it has 300 documents which are stored in a single collection, and their size vary from 1mb to 10kb. I am using the new aggregation framework which comes with 2.6 and I do not have any indexes.

I have an aggregation pipeline as following:

1. $match > first query match
2. $project > exclude some fields for efficiency
3. $unwind > unwind one of the arrays
4. $unwind > unwind second array
5. $project > projection to find matching fields among two arrays with $eq
6. $match > same:true
7. $group > put the unwinded arrays together
8. $limit(50)

this pipeline above requires 30 seconds. If I remove $limit, it takes ages. My question is:

Database size is only 30MB, and pipeline is not complicated at all. Why is it taking so long? Any ideas on that?


EDIT

My schema is as following:

{
username: string (max 20 chars
userid : string max 20 chars
userage : string max 20 chars
userobj1: array of objects, length: ~300-500 

// example of userobj1:
    [
       { 
          innerobj1: array of objects, length: ~30-50
          innerobj2: array of objects, length: ~100-200
          userinfo1: string max 20 chars
          userinfo2: string max 20 chars
          userinfo3: string max 20 chars
          userinfo4: string max 20 chars
       } ...
    ]

userobj2: same as userobj1
userobj3: same as userobj1
userobj4: same as userobj1
}

this document above has inner objects up to 3-4 levels. Sorry that I cannot provide an example but the alias should be enough. Example query is as following:

1. $match: 
    $and : [
             {userobj1: $elemMatch: {userinfo1:a}}, 
             {userobj1: $elemMatch: {userinfo4:b}}
           ]
2. $project {username:1, userid:1, userobj1:1, userobj2:1}
3. $unwind userobj1
4. $unwind userobj2
5. $project 
        {
          username:1, 
          userid:1, 
          userobj1:1, 
          userobj2:1,
          userobj3:1, 
          userobj4:1, 
          "same" : {
              $eq: [ userobj3.userinfo4, userobj4.userinfo4 ]
           }
         }
6. $match {same:true}
7. $group all arrays back
8. limit 50.
share|improve this question
    
Just guessing here, but when you don't care about duplicates, you could try using $push instead of $addToSet. It should be faster because it doesn't have to iterate the whole array to check if the value already exists. –  Philipp Jun 2 at 13:44
    
can you provide a less vague description? I think it would be helpful if we new some of the data and the actual aggregation query. –  xlembouras Jun 2 at 13:46
    
@xlembouras I will, @Philipp I tried to play around with group, even putting a single group on _id does not help, still 30seconds –  anvarik Jun 2 at 13:47
    
can you share your aggregration query and the schema with a sample document? –  John Petrone Jun 2 at 13:49
    
please have a look to the edit –  anvarik Jun 2 at 14:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is something here that I just don't get about what you are actually trying to do here. So please bear with me on the possible actual questions and answers that I see.

Considering this simplified data set to your case:

{
    "obj1": [
        { "a": "a", "b": "b" },
        { "a": "a", "b": "c" }
    ],
    "obj2": [
        { "a": "c", "b": "b" },
        { "a": "c", "b": "c" }
    ]
},
{
    "obj1": [
        { "a": "a", "b": "b" }
    ],
    "obj2": [
        { "a": "a", "b": "c" }
    ]
}

Q: "Are you not just trying to to match the documents with { "a": "a", "b": b" } in "obj1" and also { "b": "b" } in "object2"?"

If that is the case then this is just a simple query with .find():

db.collection.find({
    "obj1": {
        "$elemMatch": { "a": "a", "b": "b" }
    },
    "obj2.b": "b"
})

Matches only one of those documents that meets the conditions, in this case just the one:

{
    "obj1": [
        { "a": "a", "b": "b" },
        { "a": "a", "b": "c" }
    ],
    "obj2": [
        { "a": "c", "b": "b" },
        { "a": "c", "b": "c" }
    ]
}

Q: "Are you possibly trying to find the positions in the array where your conditions are true?"

If so there are some operators available to MongoDB 2.6 that helps you without using $unwind:

db.objects.aggregate([
    { "$match": {
        "obj1": {
            "$elemMatch": { "a": "a", "b": "b" }
        },
        "obj2.b": "b"
    }},
    { "$project": {
        "obj1": 1,
        "obj2": 1,
        "match1": {
            "$map": {
                "input": "$obj1",
                "as": "el",
                "in": {
                    "$and": [
                        { "$eq": [ "$$el.a", "a" ] },
                        { "$eq": [ "$$el.b", "b" ] }
                    ]
                }
            }
        },
        "match2": {
            "$map": {
                "input": "$obj2",
                "as": "el",
                "in": {
                    "$eq": [ "$$el.b", "b" ]
                }
            }
        }
    }}
])

Gives you:

{
    "obj1": [
        { "a": "a", "b": "b" },
        { "a": "a", "b": "c" }
    ],
    "obj2": [
        { "a": "c", "b": "b" },
        { "a": "c", "b": "c" }
    ],
    "match1" : [
            true,
            false
    ],
    "match2" : [
            true,
            false
    ]
}

Q: "Or are you possibly trying to "filter" only the matching array elements to those conditions?"

You can do this with more set operators in MongoDB 2.6 without using $unwind:

db.objects.aggregate([
    { "$match": {
        "obj1": {
            "$elemMatch": { "a": "a", "b": "b" }
        },
        "obj2.b": "b"
    }},
    { "$project": {
        "obj1": {
            "$setDifference": [
                { "$map": {
                    "input": "$obj1",
                    "as": "el",
                    "in": {
                         "$cond": [
                           { "$and": [
                                { "$eq": [ "$$el.a", "a" ] },
                                { "$eq": [ "$$el.b", "b" ] }
                            ]},
                            "$$el",
                            false
                        ]
                    }
                }},
                [false]
            ]
        },
        "obj2": {
            "$setDifference": [
                { "$map": {
                    "input": "$obj2",
                    "as": "el",
                    "in": {
                        "$cond": [
                            { "$eq": [ "$$el.b", "b" ] },
                            "$$el",
                            false
                        ]
                    }
                }},
                [false]
            ]
        }
    }}
])

And the result:

{
    "obj1": [
        { "a": "a", "b": "b" },
    ],
    "obj2": [
        { "a": "c", "b": "b" },
    ]
}

The last entry there is the cutest which combines $cond, $map and $setDifference to do some complex filtering of the objects in the array in order to filter just the matches to the conditions. You previously would have to $unwind and $match to get those results.

So it is both $unwind and $group that are not required to actually get to any of these results, and those are really killing you. Also your big "pass through" on the "unwound" arrays with $eq suggests trying to get to the end result of one of the above, but in the way you have implemented it would be very costly.

Also try to have an index within one of those arrays for the element to match that is going to reduce your working results down as far as possible. In all cases it's going to improve things even if you cannot have a compound "multi-key" index due to the restrictions there.

Anyhow, hoping that at least something here that either matches your intent or is at least close to what you are trying to do.


Since your comments went this way, matching values of "obj1.a" to "obj2.b" without the filtering is not much different to the general cases shown.

db.objects.aggregate([
    { "$project": {
        "match": {
            "$size": {
                "$setIntersection": [
                    { "$map": {
                        "input": "$obj1",
                        "as": "el",
                        "in": { "$concat": ["$$el.a",""] }
                    }},
                    { "$map": {
                        "input": "$obj2",
                        "as": "el",
                        "in": { "$concat": ["$$el.b",""] }
                    }}
                ]
            }
        }
    }},
    { "$match": { "$gte": 1 } }
])

All simply done without using $unwind.

share|improve this answer
    
hey Neil, thanks for your detailed answer. I will try to answer your questions: A1: sorry I forgot to add a $match, I do a {same:true} match after projection, and the reason is that I need to return the documents that only have that inner equality. A2:position does not matter.. A3: yes I d like to filter, and without using $where. What I would like to add is that if I exclude $limit I am hitting 16mb barrier, and if I try to fetch all of them with the new aggregation it takes ages. Isn't it weird? I have only a 30mb of data... –  anvarik Jun 3 at 7:41
    
@anvarik My point here is that one of those things seems to be what you are trying to do but you are going the long way about it. The basic concept followed through is that your logic on looking for the same value in "userinfo4" is the same as adding that to the initial $match condition as I show. So then you either 1: Want the whole documents back, 2: Want the positions back, 3: Filter the contents of the array to the matching documents. Those are the things shown. It is very unclear what you expect as a result, hence the format of the answer. –  Neil Lunn Jun 3 at 7:51
    
I totally understand. But please have a look to my steps 3 to 6. First I am doing two $unwinds on two array of objects, and after that I am doing a $project with $eq. The reason is that I need two values to be equal where I only know the keys. In your example what I want is $where:'obj1.a = obj2.b'. I see that you are proposing ways to eliminate first 4-5 stages to boost the performance, but probably I did not explain the case well. Sorry for lack of information. –  anvarik Jun 3 at 8:15
    
@anvarik I think you are still missing it. $eq: [ userobj1.userinfo4, userobj2.userinfo4 ] is what you have in your code {$match: { "userobj1.userinfo4": b, "userobj2.userinfo4": b }} does exactly the same thing, which is what I am saying from the start. obj1.a == obj2.b is different to your code you have shown. But if you want that, it is just a variation on the above which I can write out if that is what you need. –  Neil Lunn Jun 3 at 8:29
    
but in {$match: { "userobj1.userinfo4": b, "userobj2.userinfo4": b }} you know that these two fields should be b, I don't know whether it is b or c etc. that is why I do $eq: [ userobj1.userinfo4, userobj2.userinfo4 ], and that is why I unwind. Do you think this is the bottleneck? I don't know a way to do that without unwinding and projecting –  anvarik Jun 3 at 8:37

My guess is that it takes that long because there are no indexes so it does a full collection scan every time it needs a record.

Try adding an index on userinfo1:a and I think you will see a good performance gain. I will also recommend that you remove the AND syntax from the match phase and rewrite it as a list.

I think it would be really helpful for both you and the question to give us the output of the aggregation's explain. In mongo 2.6 you can have explain in aggregation pipeline.

db.collection.aggregate( [ ... stages ...], { explain:true } )
share|improve this answer
    
nah I tried adding indexes to the first matching stage, didnt help. Maybe it is because of long pipeline? Have no idea .. –  anvarik Jun 2 at 21:04

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