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I have an @Scheduled task which send data to a client every sec throught a websocket.

My need is to start running my scheduled task only when the client ask for it.

Instead of, my task starts when my server starts. it's not the behavior i want.

currently, I have a bean of my scheduled task which is declared in my SchedulingConfigurer :

@Configuration
@EnableScheduling
public class SchedulingConfigurer implements org.springframework.scheduling.annotation.SchedulingConfigurer {

    @Bean
    public ThreadPoolTaskScheduler taskScheduler() {
        return new ThreadPoolTaskScheduler();
    }

    @Bean
    public ScheduledTask scheduledTask() {
        return new ScheduledTask();
    }

    @Override
    public void configureTasks(ScheduledTaskRegistrar taskRegistrar) {
        taskRegistrar.setTaskScheduler(taskScheduler());
    }

}

Here is my spring controller code :

@MessageMapping("/hello")
public void greeting() throws Exception {
   //How do I start my scheduled task here ?
}

Maybe isn't possible to do that with @Scheduled annotation and i have to use the TaskScheduler interface ?

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quick question: could you explain why you're not doing it the other way around, i.e. sending messages with your scheduled task and let the client subscribe to that topic only when needed? Like in github.com/rstoyanchev/spring-websocket-portfolio ? –  Brian Clozel Jun 2 '14 at 16:20
    
I don't want to let the task run on the server if any client needs it. –  stephane06 Jun 3 '14 at 7:57

1 Answer 1

@Schedule is the declarative way, so not the point you're trying to achieve here.

You could create a Bean using one of the TaskScheduler implementations, such as ThreadPoolTaskScheduler and inject that bean in your application. It has all the necessary methods to dynamically schedule tasks.

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