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Say I have a simple table that contains username, firstname, lastname.

How do I express this in berkeley Db?

I'm currently using bsddb as the interface.

Cheers.

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have to pick one "column" as the key (must be unique; I imagine that would be "username" in your case) -- the only way searches will ever possibly happen. The other columns can be made to be the single string value of that key by any way you like, from pickling to simple joining with a character that's guaranteed to never occur in any of the columns, such as `\0' for many kind of "readable text strings".

If you need to be able to search by different keys you'll need other, supplementary and separate bsddb databases set up as "indices" into your main table -- it's lots of work, and there's lots of literature on the subject. (Alternatively, you move to a higher-abstraction technology, such as sqlite, which handles the indexing neatly on your behalf;-).

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There is several ways to do that using ordered key/value store.

The simplest solution is to store documents as json values with a correct key.

Now you probably want to build index over those columns to retrieve documents without having to iterate over all the hashmap to find the correct object. For that you can use a secondaryDB that will build automatically the index for you. Or you can build the index yourself.

If you don't want to deal with key packing (and it's a good idea for starting up), you can take advantage of DB.set_bt_compare which will allow you to use cpickle, json or msgpack for both keys and values while still having an order that makes sens to create indices and doing queries. This is slower method but introduce the pattern of key composition.

To fully take advantage what ordered key is, you can make use of Cursor.set_range(key) to set the position of the db at the beginning of a query.

Another pattern, is called the EAV pattern stores tuples that follow the scheme (entity, attribute, value) and then you build various index by using permutation of that tuple. I learned this pattern studing datomic.

For less ressource hungry database, you will go the "static typed" way and store as much as possible of common information in the "metadata" table and split documents (which are really RDBMS tables) into their own hashmap.

To get you started here is an example database using bsddb (but you could build it using another ordered key/value store like wiredtiger or leveldb) that implements the EAV pattern. In this implementation I swap EAV for IKV which translates to Unique identifier, Key, Value. The overal result is that you have a fully indexed schema less document database. I think it's a good compromise between efficiency and ease-of-use.

import struct

from json import dumps
from json import loads

from bsddb3.db import DB
from bsddb3.db import DBEnv
from bsddb3.db import DB_BTREE
from bsddb3.db import DB_CREATE
from bsddb3.db import DB_INIT_MPOOL
from bsddb3.db import DB_LOG_AUTO_REMOVE


def pack(*values):
    def __pack(value):
        if type(value) is int:
            return '1' + struct.pack('>q', value)
        elif type(value) is str:
            return '2' + struct.pack('>q', len(value)) + value
        else:
            data = dumps(value, encoding='utf-8')
            return '3' + struct.pack('>q', len(data)) + data
    return ''.join(map(__pack, values))


def unpack(packed):
    kind = packed[0]
    if kind == '1':
        value = struct.unpack('>q', packed[1:9])[0]
        packed = packed[9:]
    elif kind == '2':
        size = struct.unpack('>q', packed[1:9])[0]
        value = packed[9:9+size]
        packed = packed[size+9:]
    else:
        size = struct.unpack('>q', packed[1:9])[0]
        value = loads(packed[9:9+size])
        packed = packed[size+9:]
    if packed:
        values = unpack(packed)
        values.insert(0, value)
    else:
        values = [value]
    return values


class TupleSpace(object):
    """Generic database"""

    def __init__(self, path):
        self.env = DBEnv()
        self.env.set_cache_max(10, 0)
        self.env.set_cachesize(5, 0)
        flags = (
            DB_CREATE |
            DB_INIT_MPOOL
        )
        self.env.log_set_config(DB_LOG_AUTO_REMOVE, True)
        self.env.set_lg_max(1024 ** 3)
        self.env.open(
            path,
            flags,
            0
        )

        # create vertices and edges k/v stores
        def new_store(name):
            flags = DB_CREATE
            elements = DB(self.env)
            elements.open(
                name,
                None,
                DB_BTREE,
                flags,
                0,
            )
            return elements
        self.tuples = new_store('tuples')
        self.index = new_store('index')
        self.txn = None

    def get(self, uid):
        cursor = self.tuples.cursor()

        def __get():
            record = cursor.set_range(pack(uid, ''))
            if not record:
                return
            key, value = record
            while True:
                other, key = unpack(key)
                if other == uid:
                    value = unpack(value)[0]
                    yield key, value
                    record = cursor.next()
                    if record:
                        key, value = record
                        continue
                    else:
                        break
                else:
                    break

        tuples = dict(__get())
        cursor.close()
        return tuples

    def add(self, uid, **properties):
        for key, value in properties.items():
            self.tuples.put(pack(uid, key), pack(value))
            self.index.put(pack(key, value, uid), '')

    def delete(self, uid):
        # delete item from main table and index
        cursor = self.tuples.cursor()
        index = self.index.cursor()
        record = cursor.set_range(pack(uid, ''))
        if record:
            key, value = record
        else:
            cursor.close()
            raise Exception('not found')
        while True:
            other, key = unpack(key)
            if other == uid:
                # remove tuple from main index
                cursor.delete()

                # remove it from index
                value = unpack(value)[0]
                index.set(pack(key, value, uid))
                index.delete()

                # continue
                record = cursor.next()
                if record:
                    key, value = record
                    continue
                else:
                    break
            else:
                break
        cursor.close()

    def update(self, uid, **properties):
        self.delete(uid)
        self.add(uid, **properties)

    def close(self):
        self.index.close()
        self.tuples.close()
        self.env.close()

    def debug(self):
        for key, value in self.tuples.items():
            uid, key = unpack(key)
            value = unpack(value)[0]
            print(uid, key, value)

    def query(self, key, value=''):
        """return `(key, value, uid)` tuples that where
        `key` and `value` are expressed in the arguments"""
        cursor = self.index.cursor()
        match = (key, value) if value else (key,)

        record = cursor.set_range(pack(key, value))
        if not record:
            cursor.close()
            return

        while True:
            key, _ = record
            other = unpack(key)
            ok = reduce(
                lambda previous, x: (cmp(*x) == 0) and previous,
                zip(match, other),
                True
            )
            if ok:
                yield other
                record = cursor.next()
                if not record:
                    break
            else:
                break
        cursor.close()


db = TupleSpace('tmp')
# you can use a tuple to store a counter
db.add(0, counter=0)

# And then have a procedure doing the required work
# to alaways have a fresh uid
def make_uid():
    counter = db.get(0)
    counter['counter'] += 1
    return counter['counter']

amirouche = make_uid()
db.add(amirouche, username="amirouche", age=30)
print(db.get(amirouche))
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