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I'm converting a C# solution to use Castle.Windsor. One of the dependencies of some of my components is a VB6 developed DLL which is referenced currently via Interop.

How can I register this with Castle.Windsor successfully?

Before:

private AeroSuspCalc.SuspControl _suspControl;
_suspControl = new AeroSuspCalc.SuspControl();

This works just fine. However, if I register like this:

container.Register(Component
                   .For<AeroSuspCalc.SuspControl>()
                   .ImplementedBy<AeroSuspCalc.SuspControl>());

The services count is incremented by one, and the debug suggests it's fully resolved. However when I next register a component which depends on this, the debug suggests it cannot be resolved.

Some dependencies of this component could not be statically resolved. 'AeroSusp.VB6.SuspControl' is waiting for the following dependencies: - Service 'AeroSuspCalc.SuspControl' which was not registered.

And indeed once I try and use the component:

Can't create component 'AeroSusp.VB6.SuspControl' as it has dependencies to be satisfied.

'AeroSusp.VB6.SuspControl' is waiting for the following dependencies: - Service 'AeroSuspCalc.SuspControl' which was not registered.

Googling this hasn't helped much!

share|improve this question
    
did you find any solution to your problem ? I think it's because the interop types are included in the managed dll so if you've 2 dll you end with 2 interop types for the same control. Registering one type doesn't allow you to resolve using the second type. But I still search a solution for this.. – Fabske Mar 15 '15 at 9:48
    
No I've not resolved it. Your idea sounds plausible though. – IntoNET Mar 16 '15 at 10:49

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