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Will Swift-based applications work on OS X 10.9 (Mavericks)/iOS 7 and lower?

For example, I have a machine running OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion), and I am wondering if an application I write in Swift will run on it.

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39  
Assuming Swift is compiled into a "normal" executable and assuming there is no Swift specific runtime library needed in the OS, then yes, it should run on older systems. We just don't know yet. Download Xcode 6 and try it. –  rmaddy Jun 2 at 19:33
11  
An official answer will be found in the State of the Union video. –  Steven Fisher Jun 2 at 23:48
4  
There is a difference between "works" and "supported". "Supported" means that if there is a problem, then it's Apple responsibility, "works" means you're on your own. Apple always says a technology is "supported" on this or that system they never say something "works" You can get a lot of things to work, at least to some extent, on much wider range of systems and hardware than Apple or any other vendor will support. –  TechZen Jun 5 at 15:36
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@rmaddy FWIW: at the WWDC, in the Swift presentation it was most clearly stated that Swift and Objective-C have the same runtime. –  11684 Jun 5 at 21:45
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I think this question deserves +1000 votes since it was 12 hours earlier than my identical question which got -5 votes. First to market advantage on SO :) –  Cosmin Jun 19 at 10:12

15 Answers 15

up vote 326 down vote accepted

I just tested it for you, Swift applications compile into standard binaries and can be run on OS X 10.9 and iOS 7.

Simple Swift application used for testing:

func application(application: UIApplication, didFinishLaunchingWithOptions launchOptions: NSDictionary?) -> Bool {
    self.window = UIWindow(frame: UIScreen.mainScreen().bounds)

    var controller = UIViewController()
    var view = UIView(frame: CGRectMake(0, 0, 320, 568))
    view.backgroundColor = UIColor.redColor()
    controller.view = view

    var label = UILabel(frame: CGRectMake(0, 0, 200, 21))
    label.center = CGPointMake(160, 284)
    label.textAlignment = NSTextAlignment.Center
    label.text = "I'am a test label"
    controller.view.addSubview(label)

    self.window!.rootViewController = controller
    self.window!.makeKeyAndVisible()
    return true
}
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9  
See stackoverflow.com/questions/24007050/… - it conflicts with this answer (at least the "or even lower" part). –  rmaddy Jun 3 at 4:52
6  
I've only tested iOS 7.0 and OS X 10.9. As said in the answer. –  Leandros Jun 3 at 7:59
    
@Leandros By using var keyword, why do we need to type UIViewController two times in this line "var controller: UIViewController = UIViewController()"? Is var not same as JavaScript/C# (if no, then so sad)? Is this casting, but object types are same on both sides of equal sign? –  Tien Do Jun 6 at 4:29
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@TienDo I don't have any Swift experience, but I suppose the first UIViewController after the colon represents the type of the variable and the second occurrence after the = sign calls the constructor (initializes the variable). –  ComFreek Jun 6 at 8:42
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For iOS : in Xcode 6 beta, there are deployment targets up to iOS 6. I tested them all out, worked find. There are some answers stuating the same. –  Oinobares Jun 27 at 7:23

Swift code can be deployed to OS X 10.9 and iOS 7.0. It will usually crash at launch on older OS versions.

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29  
That's as definitive as it gets. Mr. Parker is in the guts of it. –  uchuugaka Jun 3 at 9:27
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Greg, thanks for coming here to answer questions. Can you say a bit about what changed 10.8->10.9 and 6.x->7.0 that allows code generated from Swift to run? –  Ivan Vučica Jun 7 at 9:53
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Swift sets some bits in the Objective-C metadata to mark Swift classes. libobjc in OS X 10.9 and iOS 7.0 was changed to ignore these bits in preparation for Swift's arrival. Older OS versions will be confused by these bits. –  Greg Parker Jun 21 at 1:05
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I'd MUCH appreciate if Apple would consider making Swift apps work on older platforms too (at least from OSX 10.7 onwards). Reason is that we still have many customers with this OS, so we cannot start developing with Swift for years if 10.9 is the minimum supported OS! –  Mike Lischke Jun 21 at 16:40

Apple has announced that Swift apps will be backward compatible with iOS 7 and OS X Mavericks. The WWDC app is written in Swift.

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9  
Really WWDC is written in Swift?? –  satheeshwaran Jun 3 at 15:24
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Yes, WWDCC app is written in Swift. As they said yesterday. –  Shial Jun 3 at 15:38
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Jay Freeman claims otherwise: twitter.com/saurik/status/473785847926374400 –  Ivan Vučica Jun 3 at 18:05
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Apple's marketing tactic is a common one used by businesses though. Windows was written in Assembly! Well, only the bootloader and some other things, but it was written in assembly. –  Cole Johnson Jun 3 at 23:23
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@IvanVučica but 4 classes are enough to answer the compatibility question. –  ilya n. Jun 4 at 23:14

Update - As per Xcode 6 Beta 4

iOS 7 and OS X 10.9 minimum deployment target

The Swift compiler and Xcode now enforce a minimum deployment target of iOS 7 or OS X Mavericks. Setting an earlier deployment target results in a build failure.

From Xcode 6 release note

So my previous answer(Shown below) will not be applicable to any further development. Swift will no longer available for iOS6 and below


A Swift application can be run on iOS 6. Even though many people are saying that Swift will support only iOS 7+ and OS X 10.9+, from my experience it's not.

I have tested a simple application written completely in Swift in an iOS 6 device. It works perfectly fine. As Apple says, Swift code is binary compatible with Objective-C code. It uses the same compiler and runtime to create the binary.

Here is the code I have tested:

import UIKit

class ViewController: UIViewController {

    override func viewDidLoad() {

        super.viewDidLoad()

        let button   = UIButton.buttonWithType(UIButtonType.System) as UIButton
        button.frame = CGRectMake(100, 100, 100, 50)
        button.backgroundColor = UIColor.greenColor()
        button.setTitle("Test Button", forState: UIControlState.Normal)
        button.addTarget(self, action: "buttonTapped:", forControlEvents: UIControlEvents.TouchUpInside)

        self.view.addSubview(button)
    }

    func buttonTapped(sender: UIButton!) {
        println("buttonTapped")
    }
}

It is a simple application, just adding a button programmatically. My application contains only two files, AppDelegate.swift and ViewController.swift.

So if you are not using any new APIs added as part of the iOS 8 SDK or some Swift specific APIs (corresponding API is not available for Objective-C) your application will seamlessly work on iOS 6 or later (tested and working), even on iOS 5 (not tested). Most of the APIs in Swift are just the replacement of the existing Objective-C APIs. In fact they are the same in binary.

Note: As per Xcode 6 beta 4 for swift apps deployment target should be iOS 7 or OS X 10.9(see the above update). So swift will no longer available for iOS6 and below


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The same as previous system updates, some frameworks/classes are discontinued and have to be conditionally supported. –  Michael H. Jun 5 at 14:00
    
No more square brackets, I like Swift. Can I still use semicolons? :) –  Tien Do Jun 6 at 4:40
    
@TienDo No need of semicolons:) Even if you put by mistake(its a tradition) that wont be a problem –  Anil Jun 6 at 4:42
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But you can still use semicolons if you really want. two statements in one line are separated by a semicolon –  ChinaPaul Jun 8 at 3:18

Swift uses the same runtime as Objective-C and can even live side-by-side Objective-C in the same application (as per the WWDC 2014 keynote).

This will need to be checked/verified using Xcode 6 and the new SDK to find a final answer.

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1  
It looks like that using Xcode Beta 6 will allow you to run swift apps on 10.9.3, but I am not sure how far back a swift app will be able to run, ex 10.7 or 10.8? –  John Jun 2 at 20:07

While code confirms it, Apple itself has said that Swift will be compatible on iOS 7 and Mavericks in their technical keynote (State of the platforms, session 102, around the 34 min 00 sec mark) at WWDC 2014.

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I read all answers that said: No, Swift does not work with less than iOS 7. But I said YES, I just created a Swift project that does run in Xcode 5 with 6.0 deployment target.

  • I just create a demo project in Xcode 6 BETA with the Swift programming language selected.
  • Close Xcode 6 beta, and I open this demo project in Xcode 5 with deployment target 6.0
  • And also select simulator 6.1.

Then that project runs well in simulator 6.1. My Mac OS X is 10.9.3, so I said yes, that runs in lower than iOS 7. with 10.9.3 Mac OS X.

Here it is a screenshot of the simulator:

Enter image description here

Here is a demo as well: http://www.filedropper.com/demo_5

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Question: Without swift support how XCode-5 builds the swift source? –  Subin Sebastian Sep 26 at 4:34
    
this above sample code is build in xcode5 –  Nitin Gohel Sep 26 at 4:45

This is the post I read from apple Swift blog, might be helpful:

App Compatibility:

If you write a Swift app you can trust that your app will work well into the future. In fact, you can target back to OS X Mavericks or iOS 7 with that same app. This is possible because Xcode embeds a small Swift runtime library within your app's bundle. Because the library is embedded, your app uses a consistent version of Swift that runs on past, present, and future OS releases.

Binary Compatibility and Frameworks:

While your app's runtime compatibility is ensured, the Swift language itself will continue to evolve, and the binary interface will also change. To be safe, all components of your app should be built with the same version of Xcode and the Swift compiler to ensure that they work together.

This means that frameworks need to be managed carefully. For instance, if your project uses frameworks to share code with an embedded extension, you will want to build the frameworks, app, and extensions together. It would be dangerous to rely upon binary frameworks that use Swift — especially from third parties. As Swift changes, those frameworks will be incompatible with the rest of your app. When the binary interface stabilizes in a year or two, the Swift runtime will become part of the host OS and this limitation will no longer exist.

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Swift applications are supported on iOS 7 and above as stated in Beta 4 release notes. iOS 6.0, 6.1, 7.0, 7.1, 8.0 in Xcode 6 Beta

Swift applications are supported on platforms OS X 10.9 and above. OS X 10.4 to 10.10 in Deployment Target. I have tested on targeting 10.5 to 10.10, and running on 10.9.3

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1  
I think the various deployment targets are just not yet correct (XCode 6 is a beta). Just because you can select the value doesn't mean it works. I tried with OSX 10.7 as target and it did not work. Also note that an authorative confirmation about platforms has been given above by Greg Parker. –  Mike Lischke Jun 21 at 16:38
    
@Mike Lischke, again, I had several tests to back up my arguments. And I can run OS X app when I select Deployment Target 10.7. But I do appreciate that you brought up the thread of OS X app supports. –  vladof81 Jun 21 at 19:29
    
How do you explain my results then? And what about what Greg Parker wrote? I'd be very happy if Swift Apps would work on 10.7 but so far I haven's seen a working example. Of course I can set 10.7 as deployment target too, but it doesn't make a difference. The app crahs. –  Mike Lischke Jun 22 at 8:32
    
@Mike Lischke, did you test iOS apps on devices? –  vladof81 Jun 25 at 13:56
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I also saw it and tested all the deployment target in Xcode 6 beta (same as the answer). Worked fine using 2 different test apps. –  Oinobares Jun 27 at 7:22

I tested running a bare-bone, Swift-based app on an iPod Touch (3rd gen) device. It appears Swift-based apps don't work with iOS 5.x but do work with iOS 6.x.

Here's what shows up in the debug log when I tried to launch the test app with iOS 5.0.1:

dyld: F_ADDFILESIGS failed for /private/var/mobile/Applications/59E31E79-9525-43B0-9DF6-8FEF3C0080F1/SwiftTestApp.app/Frameworks/libswift_stdlib_core.dylib with errno=1
dyld: F_ADDFILESIGS failed for /private/var/mobile/Applications/59E31E79-9525-43B0-9DF6-8FEF3C0080F1/SwiftTestApp.app/Frameworks/libswiftCoreGraphics.dylib with errno=1
dyld: F_ADDFILESIGS failed for /private/var/mobile/Applications/59E31E79-9525-43B0-9DF6-8FEF3C0080F1/SwiftTestApp.app/Frameworks/libswiftDarwin.dylib with errno=1
dyld: F_ADDFILESIGS failed for /private/var/mobile/Applications/59E31E79-9525-43B0-9DF6-8FEF3C0080F1/SwiftTestApp.app/Frameworks/libswiftDispatch.dylib with errno=1
dyld: F_ADDFILESIGS failed for /private/var/mobile/Applications/59E31E79-9525-43B0-9DF6-8FEF3C0080F1/SwiftTestApp.app/Frameworks/libswiftFoundation.dylib with errno=1
dyld: F_ADDFILESIGS failed for /private/var/mobile/Applications/59E31E79-9525-43B0-9DF6-8FEF3C0080F1/SwiftTestApp.app/Frameworks/libswiftObjectiveC.dylib with errno=1
dyld: F_ADDFILESIGS failed for /private/var/mobile/Applications/59E31E79-9525-43B0-9DF6-8FEF3C0080F1/SwiftTestApp.app/Frameworks/libswiftUIKit.dylib with errno=1
dyld: Symbol not found: _OBJC_CLASS_$_NSObject
  Referenced from: /private/var/mobile/Applications/59E31E79-9525-43B0-9DF6-8FEF3C0080F1/SwiftTestApp.app/Frameworks/libswift_stdlib_core.dylib
  Expected in: /usr/lib/libobjc.A.dylib
 in /private/var/mobile/Applications/59E31E79-9525-43B0-9DF6-8FEF3C0080F1/SwiftTestApp.app/Frameworks/libswift_stdlib_core.dylib

For iOS 6.1.6, the app runs fine without displaying those error messages.

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In brief:

Swift based applications can target back to OS X Mavericks or iOS 7 with that same app.

How is it possible ?

Xcode embeds a small Swift runtime library within your app’s bundle. Because the library is embedded, your app uses a consistent version of Swift that runs on past, present, and future OS releases.

Why should I trust this answer ?

Because I am not saying this answer as one apple guy told me in twitter or I wrote hello world and tested it.

I took it from apple developer blog.

so you can trust this.

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Try the following code:

It's working without StoryBoard:

func application(application: UIApplication, didFinishLaunchingWithOptions launchOptions: NSDictionary?) -> Bool {
    self.window = UIWindow(frame: UIScreen.mainScreen().bounds)
    self.window!.backgroundColor = UIColor.whiteColor()

    // Create a nav/vc pair using the custom ViewController class

    let nav = UINavigationController()
    let vc = ViewController(nibName: "ViewController", bundle: nil)

    // Push the vc onto the nav
    nav.pushViewController(vc, animated: false)

    // Set the window’s root view controller
    self.window!.rootViewController = nav

    // Present the window
    self.window!.makeKeyAndVisible()
    return true
}
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And how to use nav.rootviewcontroller ?? –  Allan.Chan Jun 5 at 2:28

It appears Swift applications don't run on OS X 10.7. I just created a simple GUI application (a view, a lable, a button) which runs fine on Mavericks. The base SDK is set to 10.9 and the deployment target to 10.7. I copied that application from the DerivedData folder over to my 10.7 virtual machine, and it crashs when starting, show this error:

Crashed Thread:  0

Exception Type:  EXC_BREAKPOINT (SIGTRAP)
Exception Codes: 0x0000000000000002, 0x0000000000000000

Application Specific Information:
dyld: launch, loading dependent libraries

    Dyld Error Message:

  Library not loaded: /System/Library/Frameworks/CoreGraphics.framework/Versions/A/CoreGraphics
  Referenced from: /Users/USER/Desktop/Swift-Test.app/Contents/MacOS/../Frameworks/libswiftAppKit.dylib
  Reason: image not found

Binary Images:
       0x109c65000 -        0x109c6afff +private.Swift-Test (1.0 - 1) <649695D0-58FD-3D02-9176-2D40D4E711F2> /Users/USER/Desktop/Swift-Test.app/Contents/MacOS/Swift-Test
       0x109c83000 -        0x109dbffff +libswift_stdlib_core.dylib (1.0 - 600.0.34.4.5) <10AAC369-9404-321D-A892-49F65856D7AF> /Users/USER/Desktop/Swift-Test.app/Contents/Frameworks/libswift_stdlib_core.dylib
...

However this message is irritating, since there's certainly a CoreGraphics library in this VM. Other applications that make heavy use of CoreGraphics work just fine.

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There seems to be a lot of old answers here so I just wanted to post the official response from the Swift team. Swift is backwards compatible with OS X Mavericks and iOS 7

https://developer.apple.com/swift/blog/

Jul 11, 2014

Compatibility

One of the most common questions we heard at WWDC was, “What is the compatibility story for Swift?”. This seems like a great first topic.

App Compatibility Simply put, if you write a Swift app today and submit it to the App Store this Fall when iOS 8 and OS X Yosemite are released, you can trust that your app will work well into the future. In fact, you can target back to OS X Mavericks or iOS 7 with that same app. This is possible because Xcode embeds a small Swift runtime library within your app’s bundle. Because the library is embedded, your app uses a consistent version of Swift that runs on past, present, and future OS releases.

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I also tried a very simple app on 10.8 (one button, sets text on a label). It crashed at startup, as Greg Parker stated:

Dyld Error Message:
  Symbol not found: __dispatch_source_type_memorypressure
  Referenced from: /Volumes/*/SwifTest.app/Contents/MacOS/../Frameworks/libswiftDispatch.dylib
  Expected in: /usr/lib/libSystem.B.dylib
in /Volumes/*/SwifTest.app/Contents/MacOS/../Frameworks/libswiftDispatch.dylib

(This was using a deployment target of 10.7)

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