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Good Day,

I am trying to write a script that creates a fabfile, saves it and then runs it. Here is my code so far:

#!/usr/bin/python

bakery_internalip = "10.10.15.203"

print "[....] Preparing commands to run within fabfile.py"

fabfile = open("sfab.py", "w")
fabfile.write("from fabric.api import run, sudo, task\n\n@task\ndef myinstall():\n\tsudo('yum install httpd')")
fabfile.close

print "Running Fab Commands"

import subprocess
subprocess.call(['fab', '-f', 'sfab.py', '-u ec2-user', '-i', 'id_rsa', '-H', bakery_internalip, 'myinstall'])

The contents of my fabfile are as follows:

[root@ip-10-10-20-82 bakery]# cat sfab.py
from fabric.api import run, sudo, task

@task
def myinstall():
        sudo('yum install httpd')

My script gives the following error when I run it:

Fatal error: Fabfile didn't contain any commands!

However, if I run dos2unix on the file and then run the following, it works fine:

 fab -f sfab.py -H localhost myinstall
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It should also run after without dos2unix since the file is closed when process exits. –  Martin Konecny Jun 2 '14 at 20:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Simple typo fabfile.close should be fabfile.close()

Running without closing will give you:

Running Fab Commands

Fatal error: Fabfile didn't contain any commands!

Aborting

with open("sfab.py", "w") as fabfile:
    fabfile.write("from fabric.api import run, sudo, task\n\n@task\ndef myinstall():\n\tsudo('yum install httpd')")

Alway use with as above to open your files, it will automatically close them for you and avoid these simple errors.

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3  
This is the perfect example why the with syntax should almost always be used. –  BeetDemGuise Jun 2 '14 at 20:03
1  
@DarinDouglass, you commented as I was editing. with is always the way to go. –  Padraic Cunningham Jun 2 '14 at 20:06

I assume you are running it on Windows.

When using open(path, "w"), Python uses the OS's native linebreak combo.

To use \n specifically use open(path, "wb").

For more information see open().

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Thanks for your response. I am running it on Linux... –  user3507094 Jun 3 '14 at 7:40

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