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I want to get the class name using jQuery

And if it has an id

<div class="myclass"></div>
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2  
@Amarghosh: True, true, but you could actually get into this situation, if you use some traversal methods like parents(). –  Boldewyn Mar 8 '10 at 9:49
6  
fyi this.className works without jquery (would return "myclass" in above example) –  Accipheran Apr 7 '13 at 6:01

10 Answers 10

up vote 630 down vote accepted
var className = $('.myclass').attr('class');

should do the trick.

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6  
and if its an ID var IDName = $('#id').attr('id'); –  X10nD Mar 8 '10 at 9:48
15  
As sandino points out in his answer, there is always a chance of more than one class name being set. (for instance JQuery-UI adds helper classes all over the place). You could always checked for this using if(className.indexOf(' ') !== -1){throw new Error('Uh-oh! More than one class name!');} –  Potherca Jun 11 '11 at 20:43
13  
If you leverage .attr('class') and combine it with if(className.indexOf('Class_I_am_Looking_For') > = 0) you can easily check for the existence a specific class and still handle multiple classes. –  RonnBlack Oct 28 '12 at 9:35
13  
RonnBlack: if(className.indexOf('Class_I_am_Looking_For') > = 0) will also match "This_Is_Not_the_Class_I_am_Looking_For" –  Leif Neland Jun 5 '13 at 10:46
1  
@BenRacicot in that case, simply use standard DOM methods. –  Boldewyn Mar 26 '14 at 15:23

It is better to use .hasClass() when you want to check if an element has a particular class. This is because when an element has multiple class it is not trivial to check.

Example:

<div id='test' class='main divhover'></div>

Where:

$('#test').attr('class');        // returns `main divhover`.

With .hasClass() we can test if the div has the class divhover.

$('#test').hasClass('divhover'); // returns true
$('#test').hasClass('main');     // returns true
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5  
But what if you don't know the classname? ;-) –  Potherca Jun 11 '11 at 20:41
7  
that's right...this is only usefull if you know the classname you are checking...but my comment was to alert you not to use .attr('class')=='CLASSNAME_YOU_ARE_SEARCHING' to check if a dom element has some class instead it's better to use .hasClass –  sandino Jun 15 '11 at 19:45
3  
Another way is to use .is('.divhover') –  orad Dec 12 '12 at 20:09
    
Is it possible to loop over classes of an element? –  Fractaliste Mar 3 at 15:07
    
Yes it is just do $(element).attr("class").split(' '); and you get a list then just use a for or foreach loop –  sandino Apr 15 at 22:15

Be Careful , Perhaps , you have a class and a subclass .

  <div id='id' class='myclass mysubclass' >dfdfdfsdfds</div>

If you use previous solutions , you will have :

myclass mysubclass

So if you want to have the class selector, do the following :

var className = '.'+$('#id').attr('class').split(' ').join('.')

and you will have

.myclass.mysubclass

Now if you want to select all elements that have the same class such as div above :

   var brothers=$('.'+$('#id').attr('class').split(' ').join('.'))

that means

var brothers=$('.myclass.mysubclass')
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5  
There may be more than one space between classes. More correct variant var className = '.'+$('#id').attr('class').replace(/ +(?= )/g,'').split(' ').join('.') –  Suhan Nov 26 '13 at 10:59
1  
An even more correct expression is '.'+$('#id').attr('class').split(/[ \n\r\t\f]+/).join('.'), because space, Tab, LF, CR and FF are allowed to separate classes. (.split() also accepts RegExps.) –  Boldewyn Jul 7 '14 at 7:28
    
'.'+$('#id').attr('class').split(/\s+/).join('.') would be more concise, wouldn't it? Or would that match something I'm not thinking about? –  LostHisMind Jan 30 at 23:59

This is to get the second class into multiple classes using into a element

var class_name = $('#videobuttonChange').attr('class').split(' ')[1];
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you can simply use,

var className = $('#id').attr('class');

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If your <div> has an id:

​<div id="test" class="my-custom-class"></div>​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

...you can try:

var yourClass = $("#test").prop("class");

If your <div> has only a class, you can try:

var yourClass = $(".my-custom-class").prop("class");
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If you're going to use the split function to extract the class names, then you're going to have to compensate for potential formatting variations that could produce unexpected results. For example:

" myclass1  myclass2 ".split(' ').join(".")

produces

".myclass1..myclass2."

I think you're better off using a regular expression to match on set of allowable characters for class names. For example:

" myclass1  myclass2  ".match(/[\d\w-_]+/g);

produces

["myclass1", "myclass2"]

The regular expression is probably not complete, but hopefully you understand my point. This approach mitigates the possibility of poor formatting.

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To complete Whitestock answer (which is the best I found) I did :

className = $(this).attr('class').match(/[\d\w-_]+/g);
className = '.' + className.join(' .');

So for " myclass1 myclass2 " the result will be '.myclass1 .myclass2'

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You can get class Name by two ways :

var className = $('.myclass').attr('class');

OR

var className = $('.myclass').prop('class');
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If you do not know the class name BUT you know the ID you can try this:

<div id="currentST" class="myclass"></div>

Then Call it using :

alert($('#currentST').attr('class'));
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