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I have a view model with a property Fields which is an ObservableCollection<FieldVM>. In the view that uses this property, I have an ItemsControl like so:

...
<ItemsControl ItemsSource="{Binding Fields}" />
...

FieldVM is an abstract class, implemented by such classes as TextFieldVM and EnumFieldVM. During run time, these FieldVM-implementations get added to the Fields property and I want them to show up in my view with their associated views.

In WPF, doing this is simple, I do it all the time. You just do this in an appropriate resource dictionary, and everything works as expected:

<DataTemplate DataType="{x:Type vm:TextFieldVM}">
    <v:TextFieldView />
</DataTemplate>

<DataTemplate DataType="{x:Type vm:EnumFieldVM}">
    <v:EnumFieldView />
</DataTemplate>

Now, working in Silverlight for the first time, I expected I could just do the same thing, but the DataTemplate doesn't have a DataType property. I'm stumped. What's the Silverlight-way of doing this?

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7 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Use a Value Converter to bind the type to the visibility of each view:

<DataTemplate> 
    <Grid>
        <v:EnumFieldView 
            Visibilty="{Binding Converter={StaticResource ViewVisibilityConverter}, ConverterParameter=Enum}" /> 
        <v:TextFieldView 
            Visibilty="{Binding Converter={StaticResource ViewVisibilityConverter}, ConverterParameter=Text}" />
    </Grid
</DataTemplate> 

And in the ConvertTo of the ViewVisibilityConverter, switch the visibility based on the type.

Another way to look at it would be to use a different type of value converter to return a different data template from the Application.Resources.

<ListBox ItemTemplate="{Binding Converter={StaticResource ItemTemplateFactory}"/>

in ItemTemplateFactory.Convert():

var fieldVM = value as FieldVM;

switch fieldVM.FieldType:
{
    case "Text":
         return Application.Current.Resources["TextTemplate"] as DataTemplate;

    case "Enum":
         return Application.Current.Resources["EnumTemplate"] as DataTemplate;

}
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2  
Thanks for your suggestion. It works, and I'm marking it as the answer, but it's not really an ideal solution... it's more of an ugly hack. I can't help but feel like there has to be a more proper, WPF-like way of doing this. –  Alex Mar 9 '10 at 14:36
    
I added an additional option that might be a bit prettier: –  Michael S. Scherotter Mar 9 '10 at 22:33
    
@Alex: I realize I'm a year late to the game here, but I implemented a BooleanVisibility attached behavior which you might find interesting. You can find the write-up here: executableintent.com/…. Part 2 of the series has a code sample with an attached behavior framework and the BooleanVisibility implementation. –  Bryan Watts Mar 23 '11 at 19:51
1  
There seem to be two solutions mentioned here. The first is not good, as it uses Visibility rather than proper templating. You will find that the resources and memory for all the templates is loaded, so it is inefficient. Your second solution seems fine. –  Stephen Holt Mar 30 '12 at 8:30
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Microsoft Prism library has custom DataTemplateSelector implementation, notice Classnames in DataTemplate x:keys:

                    <ItemsControl.ItemTemplate>
                    <DataTemplate>
                        <prism:DataTemplateSelector Content="{Binding}" HorizontalContentAlignment="Stretch" IsTabStop="False">
                            <prism:DataTemplateSelector.Resources>
                                <DataTemplate x:Key="OpenQuestionViewModel">
                                    <Views:OpenQuestionView DataContext="{Binding}"/>
                                </DataTemplate>

                                <DataTemplate x:Key="MultipleSelectionQuestionViewModel">
                                    <Views:MultipleSelectionView DataContext="{Binding}"/>
                                </DataTemplate>

                                <DataTemplate x:Key="NumericQuestionViewModel">
                                    <Views:NumericQuestionView DataContext="{Binding}"/>
                                </DataTemplate>
                            </prism:DataTemplateSelector.Resources>
                        </prism:DataTemplateSelector>
                    </DataTemplate>
                </ItemsControl.ItemTemplate>
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Silverlight 5 will finally include this functionality. Until then the marked answer is one of the better ways I've seen.

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...and since Silverlight 5 has now shipped, you no longer need this sort of workaround. You have to leave out the {x:Type } bit, and just specify the type name though. –  Ian Griffiths Jun 18 '12 at 20:53
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A variant on the second option from Michael (since I could not get it working directly).

In resources define an additional datatemplate:

<DataTemplate x:Key="DynamicTemplate">
  <ContentPresenter ContentTemplate="{Binding Converter={StaticResource TemplateChooser}}" Content="{Binding}"/>
</DataTemplate>

And then use this data template in the listbox

<ListBox ItemTemplate="{StaticResource DynamicTemplate}">

TemplateChooser must be an IValueConvertor, where the Convert function takes an object and returns the DataTemplate that should be used for that object.

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Not a complete answer, but a nice tip for an items control. –  Jason Williams Nov 2 '10 at 16:13
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Silverlight doesn't have a DataTemplateSelector but I used this snippet...

<ItemsControl.ItemTemplate>
    <DataTemplate>
        <client:TemplateSelector Content="{Binding}"/>
    </DataTemplate>
</ItemsControl.ItemTemplate>

Here's the template selector:

public class TemplateSelector : ContentControl
{
    protected override void OnContentChanged(object oldContent, object newContent)
    {
        base.OnContentChanged(oldContent, newContent);

        MyObject f = newContent as MyObject;

        switch (f.MyProperty)
        {
            case "Bool":
            case "String":
            case "Array":
            default:
                ContentTemplate = Application.Current.Resources["MultiSelectDataTemplate"] as DataTemplate;
                break;
        }
    }
}
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DataTemplateSelector is not available in Silverlight either... But I've seen a few tries to implement this class in Silverlight. Here's one: skysigal.xact-solutions.com/Blog/tabid/427/EntryId/1000/… –  Yuval Peled Jul 11 '10 at 5:28
    
DataTemplateSelector is not part of Silverlight 4 –  Jehof Aug 3 '10 at 9:00
    
You're right. I used another snippet as a replacement. Editing. –  infamouse Aug 3 '10 at 17:22
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This blog post: http://www.c-sharpcorner.com/Blogs/1937/ presents what looks like a nice do-it-yourself data template selector masquerading as a value converter. It has the advantage that there is no need to install Prism.

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Have you tried to neglect the DataType property? and just write something like this:

<DataTemplate>
    <v:TextFieldView />
</DataTemplate>

worked for me

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The purpose of the DataType property is to allow for dynamic selection of templates - the template that applies to the appropriate data type is used, and the others ignored. In your answer the TetxFieldView will be used every time. –  Kirk Broadhurst Nov 8 '11 at 0:57
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