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I'm using Unity in my project. But I'm unsure whether I should be using the using statement or not as I'm using the PerRequestLifetimeManager.

Simple example:

Injection:

container.RegisterType<IDataContext, MyContext>(new PerRequestLifetimeManager());

Usage:

class MyClass
{
     private readonly IDataContext _context;

     public MyClass(IDataContext context)
     {
           _context = context;
     }

     public string MyMethod()
     {
          // 1. Is this needed?
          using (var u = _context)
          {
               var customers = u.Set<Customer>().OrderBy(o => o.Name);
               // ........
          }

          // 2. OR can I just do this
          var customers = _context.Set<Customer>().OrderBy(o => o.Name);

As I'm using PerRequestLifetimeManager() in my injection, does this negate the requirement of the using statement as the context will be disposed after every http request anyway?

share|improve this question
    
This is actually an unfair question. Because, from the tags, I suspect that MyClass implements IDisposable. In which case, you should dispose on MyClass.Dispose. However, your IOC container should dispose on the end of its scoped lifetime... – Aron Jun 3 '14 at 8:24
    
I don't understand how it's "unfair"? – jzm Jun 3 '14 at 23:28
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Best practice to use Unit of Work and Repository patterns while you are working with MVC4. While you are creating every time of our context best to register your context in the UnityConfig.cs file located at App_Start folder. as

container.RegisterType<IDataContext, MyContext>(new PerRequestLifetimeManager());

after this when you start your application the context will be in open till your application closed. so, do not use the using statement at the use of context. It will dispose your context after complete of using and the context will not available further and when use context after closing using then you must got an exception like context is not available. so, just use

var customers = _context.Set<Customer>().OrderBy(o => o.Name);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that's what i thought. – jzm Jun 3 '14 at 23:49

If you would use using then you would immediately dispose DbContext and if you try to access it again it will result in exception, so 1 approach is generally bad idea. 2 would work but what if there would occur problem in DbContext, for instance new data that you would like to persist will be not compliant to db design (for instance indexes). In such case you will be unable to recreate DbContext. My advice would be to register and then resolve factory method for DbContexts:

class MyClass
{
     private readonly Func<IDataContext> _contextFactory;

     public MyClass(Func<IDataContext> contextFactory)
     {
           _contextFactory = contextFactory;
     }

     public string MyMethod()
     {
           // 1. Is this needed?
           using (var u = _contextFactory())
           { 
               var customers = u.Set<Customer>().OrderBy(o => o.Name);
               // ........
           }
     }
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