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I haven't read too much into Swift but one thing that i noticed is there are no exceptions. So how do they do error handling in swift? Has anyone found anything to error-handling?

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1  
I found error messages just like with Obj-C :o –  Arbitur Jun 3 at 8:36
5  
@Arbitur the good old segfault way? –  peko Jun 3 at 8:37
    
Created an NSTimer in Swift and when I misspelled the function it crashed and gave me an error saying it could not find the method :) –  Arbitur Jun 3 at 8:42
1  
You can add try-catch support for Swift by following the instructions in this article: medium.com/@_willfalcon/adding-try-catch-to-swift-71ab27bcb5b8 –  William Falcon Oct 13 at 3:51

8 Answers 8

up vote 28 down vote accepted

Runtime errors:

As Leandros suggests for handling runtime errors (like network connectivity problems, parsing data, opening file, etc) you should use NSError like you did in ObjC, because the Foundation, AppKit, UIKit, etc report their errors in this way. So it's more framework thing than language thing.

Another frequent pattern that is being used are separator success/failure blocks like in AFNetworking:

var sessionManager = AFHTTPSessionManager(baseURL: NSURL(string: "yavin4.yavin.planets"))
sessionManager.HEAD("/api/destoryDeathStar", parameters: xwingSquad,
    success: { (NSURLSessionDataTask) -> Void in
        println("Success")
    },
    failure:{ (NSURLSessionDataTask, NSError) -> Void in
        println("Failure")
    })

Still the failure block frequently received NSError instance, describing the error.

Programmer errors:

For programmer errors (like out of bounds access of array element, invalid arguments passed to a function call, etc) you used exceptions in ObjC. Swift language does not seem to have any language support for exceptions (like throw, catch, etc keyword). However, as documentation suggests it is running on the same runtime as ObjC, and therefore you are still able to throw NSExceptions like this:

NSException(name: "SomeName", reason: "SomeReason", userInfo: nil).raise()

You just cannot catch them in pure Swift, although you may opt for catching exceptions in ObjC code.

The questions is whether you should throw exceptions for programmer errors, or rather use assertions as Apple suggests in the language guide.

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9  
"network connectivity problems" and "opening files" using the Cocoa APIs (NSFileHandle) can throw exceptions that need to be caught. Without exceptions in Swift, you need to implement this part of your program in Objective-C or perform all your work using the BSD C APIs (both of which are poor work-arounds). See the documentation for NSFileHandle.writeData for more... developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/Cocoa/Reference/…: –  Matt Gallagher Jun 5 at 2:56
2  
Again, no exception handling means two-stage object construction with all its inherent problems. See stroustrup.com/except.pdf. –  Phil Jun 13 at 15:14
    
the fatalError(...) is the same as well. –  holex Nov 22 at 10:20

From Apple books, The Swift Programming Language it's seems erros should be handle using enum.

Here is an example from the book.

enum ServerResponse {
    case Result(String, String)
    case Error(String)
}

let success = ServerResponse.Result("6:00 am", "8:09 pm")
let failure = ServerResponse.Error("Out of cheese.")

switch success {
case let .Result(sunrise, sunset):
    let serverResponse = "Sunrise is at \(sunrise) and sunset is at \(sunset)."
case let .Error(error):
    let serverResponse = "Failure...  \(error)"
}

From: Apple Inc. “The Swift Programming Language.” iBooks. https://itun.es/br/jEUH0.l

Update

From Apple news books, "Using Swift with Cocoa and Objective-C". Runtime exceptions not occur using swift languages, so that's why you don't have try-catch. Instead you use Optional Chaining.

Here is a stretch from the book:

For example, in the code listing below, the first and second lines are not executed because the length property and the characterAtIndex: method do not exist on an NSDate object. The myLength constant is inferred to be an optional Int, and is set to nil. You can also use an if–let statement to conditionally unwrap the result of a method that the object may not respond to, as shown on line three

let myLength = myObject.length?
let myChar = myObject.characterAtIndex?(5)
if let fifthCharacter = myObject.characterAtIndex(5) {
    println("Found \(fifthCharacter) at index 5")
}

Excerpt From: Apple Inc. “Using Swift with Cocoa and Objective-C.” iBooks. https://itun.es/br/1u3-0.l


And you the books also encourage you to use cocoa error pattern from Objective-C (NSError Object)

Error reporting in Swift follows the same pattern it does in Objective-C, with the added benefit of offering optional return values. In the simplest case, you return a Bool value from the function to indicate whether or not it succeeded. When you need to report the reason for the error, you can add to the function an NSError out parameter of type NSErrorPointer. This type is roughly equivalent to Objective-C’s NSError **, with additional memory safety and optional typing. You can use the prefix & operator to pass in a reference to an optional NSError type as an NSErrorPointer object, as shown in the code listing below.

var writeError : NSError?
let written = myString.writeToFile(path, atomically: false,
    encoding: NSUTF8StringEncoding,
    error: &writeError)
if !written {
    if let error = writeError {
        println("write failure: \(error.localizedDescription)")
    }
}

Excerpt From: Apple Inc. “Using Swift with Cocoa and Objective-C.” iBooks. https://itun.es/br/1u3-0.l

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There are no Exceptions in Swift, similar to Objective-C's approach.

In development, you can use assert to catch any errors which might appear, and need to be fixed before going to production.

The classic NSError approach isn't altered, you send an NSErrorPointer, which gets populated.

Brief example:

var error: NSError?
var contents = NSFileManager.defaultManager().contentsOfDirectoryAtPath("/Users/leandros", error: &error)
if let error = error {
    println("An error occurred \(error)")
} else {
    println("Contents: \(contents)")
}
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5  
This rises a two questions: what happens when ObjC code we call from Swift actually throws an exception, and whether NSError is our universal error object like in ObjC? –  MDJ Jun 3 at 18:14
1  
Is it just a fact of life with Swift that initializers don't or can't fail? –  Phil Jun 3 at 22:41
9  
The exception handling appears rather dirty –  Tash Pemhiwa Jun 4 at 8:37
1  
don't you need to do var error: NSError? = NSError() ? –  Jiaaro Jun 6 at 14:55
8  
Yeah, who needs exceptions when you can just crash? Or put an NSError** as argument in all the functions you declare? so that every f();g(); becomes f(&err);if(err) return;g(&err);if(err) return; for the first month, then it just become f(nil);g(nil);hopeToGetHereAlive(); –  hariseldon78 Jun 20 at 16:58

The recommended 'Swift Way' is:

func write(path: String)(#error: NSErrorPointer) -> Bool { // Useful to curry error parameter for retrying (see below)!
    return "Hello!".writeToFile(path, atomically: false, encoding: NSUTF8StringEncoding, error: error)
}

var writeError: NSError?
let written = write("~/Error1")(error: &writeError)
if !written {
    println("write failure 1: \(writeError!.localizedDescription)")
    // assert(false) // Terminate program
}

However I prefer try/catch as I find it easier to follow because it moves the error handling to a separate block at the end, this arrangement is sometimes called "Golden Path". Lucky you can do this with closures:

TryBool {
    write("~/Error2")(error: $0) // The code to try
}.catch {
    println("write failure 2: \($0!.localizedDescription)") // Report failure
    // assert(false) // Terminate program
}

Also it is easy to add a retry facility:

TryBool {
    write("~/Error3")(error: $0) // The code to try
}.retry {
    println("write failure 3 on try \($1 + 1): \($0!.localizedDescription)")
    return write("~/Error3r")  // The code to retry
}.catch {
    println("write failure 3 catch: \($0!.localizedDescription)") // Report failure
    // assert(false) // Terminate program
}

The listing for TryBool is:

class TryBool {
    typealias Tryee = NSErrorPointer -> Bool
    typealias Catchee = NSError? -> ()
    typealias Retryee = (NSError?, UInt) -> Tryee

    private var tryee: Tryee
    private var retries: UInt = 0
    private var retryee: Retryee?

    init(tryee: Tryee) {
        self.tryee = tryee
    }

    func retry(retries: UInt, retryee: Retryee) -> Self {
        self.retries = retries
        self.retryee = retryee
        return self
    }
    func retry(retryee: Retryee) -> Self {
        return self.retry(1, retryee)
    }
    func retry(retries: UInt) -> Self {
        // For some reason you can't write the body as "return retry(1, nil)", the compiler doesn't like the nil
        self.retries = retries
        retryee = nil
        return self
    }
    func retry() -> Self {
        return retry(1)
    }

    func catch(catchee: Catchee) {
        var error: NSError?
        for numRetries in 0...retries { // First try is retry 0
            error = nil
            let result = tryee(&error)
            if result {
                return
            } else if numRetries != retries {
                if let r = retryee {
                    tryee = r(error, numRetries)
                }
            }
        }
        catchee(error)
    }
}

You can write a similar class for testing an Optional returned value instead of Bool value:

class TryOptional<T> {
    typealias Tryee = NSErrorPointer -> T?
    typealias Catchee = NSError? -> T
    typealias Retryee = (NSError?, UInt) -> Tryee

    private var tryee: Tryee
    private var retries: UInt = 0
    private var retryee: Retryee?

    init(tryee: Tryee) {
        self.tryee = tryee
    }

    func retry(retries: UInt, retryee: Retryee) -> Self {
        self.retries = retries
        self.retryee = retryee
        return self
    }
    func retry(retryee: Retryee) -> Self {
        return retry(1, retryee)
    }
    func retry(retries: UInt) -> Self {
        // For some reason you can't write the body as "return retry(1, nil)", the compiler doesn't like the nil
        self.retries = retries
        retryee = nil
        return self
    }
    func retry() -> Self {
        return retry(1)
    }

    func catch(catchee: Catchee) -> T {
        var error: NSError?
        for numRetries in 0...retries {
            error = nil
            let result = tryee(&error)
            if let r = result {
                return r
            } else if numRetries != retries {
                if let r = retryee {
                    tryee = r(error, numRetries)
                }
            }
        }
        return catchee(error)
    }
}

The TryOptional version enforces a non-Optional return type that makes subsequent programming easier, e.g. 'Swift Way:

struct FailableInitializer {
    init?(_ id: Int, error: NSErrorPointer) {
        // Always fails in example
        if error != nil {
            error.memory = NSError(domain: "", code: id, userInfo: [:])
        }
        return nil
    }
    private init() {
        // Empty in example
    }
    static let fallback = FailableInitializer()
}

func failableInitializer(id: Int)(#error: NSErrorPointer) -> FailableInitializer? { // Curry for retry
    return FailableInitializer(id, error: error)
}

var failError: NSError?
var failure1Temp = failableInitializer(1)(error: &failError)
if failure1Temp == nil {
    println("failableInitializer failure code: \(failError!.code)")
    failure1Temp = FailableInitializer.fallback
}
let failure1 = failure1Temp! // Unwrap

Using TryOptional:

let failure2 = TryOptional {
    failableInitializer(2)(error: $0)
}.catch {
    println("failableInitializer failure code: \($0!.code)")
    return FailableInitializer.fallback
}

let failure3 = TryOptional {
    failableInitializer(3)(error: $0)
}.retry {
    println("failableInitializer failure, on try \($1 + 1), code: \($0!.code)")
    return failableInitializer(31)
}.catch {
    println("failableInitializer failure code: \($0!.code)")
    return FailableInitializer.fallback
}

Note auto-unwrapping.

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It took a bit of figuring it out but I think I've sussed it. It seems ugly though. Nothing more than a thin skin over the Objective-C version.

Calling a function with an NSError parameter...

var fooError : NSError ? = nil

let someObject = foo(aParam, error:&fooError)

// Check something was returned and look for an error if it wasn't.
if !someObject {
   if let error = fooError {
      // Handle error
      NSLog("This happened: \(error.localizedDescription)")
   }
} else {
   // Handle success
}`

Writing the function that takes an error parameter...

func foo(param:ParamObject, error: NSErrorPointer) -> SomeObject {

   // Do stuff...

   if somethingBadHasHappened {
      if error {
         error.memory = NSError(domain: domain, code: code, userInfo: [:])
      }
      return nil
   }

   // Do more stuff...
}
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Here's an excellent link from Dave Verwer's iOS Dev Weekly newsletter that discusses error handling in swift. The article is from ther Swiftly Typing blog

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Basic wrapper around objective C that gives you the try catch feature. https://github.com/williamFalcon/SwiftTryCatch

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Good idea. But who decide to use this must keep in mind that objects allocated in the try block are not deallocated when an exception is thrown. This can cause problems of zombie objects and every use of RAII is compromised (auto-unlock, auto-sql-commit, auto-sql-rollback...). Maybe c++ could help us with some form of "runAtExit"? –  hariseldon78 Oct 14 at 19:07
    
Update: i just found that there is a flag in clang to enable the release of objects at exception throwing: -fobjc-arc-exceptions . I must try if it still work with the wrapped version (i think it should) –  hariseldon78 Oct 14 at 20:31

You can use this: Swift Try Catch

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