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Quite often I need to replace subsequence of certain elements with another sequence of the same type, but, probably with different length. Implementation of such function is no challenge, this is what I use now:

(defun substitute* (new old where &key key (test #'eql))
  (funcall (alambda (rest)
             (aif (search old rest :key key :test test)
                  (concatenate (etypecase rest
                                 (string 'string)
                                 (vector 'vector)
                                 (list 'list))
                               (subseq rest 0 it)
                               new
                               (self (subseq rest (+ it (length old)))))
                  rest))
           where))

Works like this:

CL-USER> (substitute* '(x y) '(z) '(1 z 5 8 y z))
(1 X Y 5 8 Y X Y)
CL-USER> (substitute* "green button" "red button"
                      "here are red indicator, red button and red wire")
"here are red indicator, green button and red wire"
CL-USER> (substitute* #(4) #(2 2) #(2 2 2 2 2))
#(4 4 2)

You see, it's very handy and useful, so I've feeling that I'm reinventing wheel and it must be in the standard library, I just don't know its name (sometimes names are not obvious, you may search for filter while what you need is set-difference).

As a result of compromise between clarity and efficiency:

(defun substitute* (new old where &key key (test #'eql))
  (let ((type (etypecase where
                (string 'string)
                (vector 'vector)
                (list 'list)))
        (new (coerce new 'list))
        (old (coerce old 'list))
        (where (coerce where 'list)))
    (coerce (funcall (alambda (rest)
                       (aif (search old rest :key key :test test)
                            (append (remove-if (constantly t) rest :start it)
                                    new
                                    (self (nthcdr (+ it (length old)) rest)))
                            rest))
                     where)
            type)))
share|improve this question
1  
why would one use funcall + alambda, instead of a plain LABELS? Also you are using recursion + concatenate. Looks like a lot of intermediate garbage. –  Rainer Joswig Jun 3 '14 at 10:24
    
If one uses lambda to make things shorter and convenient, why not to use alambda for the same reason? I think alambda looks better and less nested. What for intermediate garbage.. well, we have garbage collector in LISP, don't we? Is my code dangerous or bad? –  Mark Jun 3 '14 at 10:34
1  
You could use replace (together with copy-seq if you don't want the function to be destructive) instead of concatenate and subseq. –  Rörd Jun 3 '14 at 10:50
1  
@Rörd, if resulting string is shorter than original one, there may be bug. –  Mark Jun 3 '14 at 11:33
1  
@Rörd The replace and copy-seq is absolutely right if the sequence to "splice in" is the same length as the subsequence to be replaced, but I think that's not the case, as per "I need to replace subsequence of certain elements with another sequence of the same type, but, probably with different length". –  Joshua Taylor Jun 3 '14 at 11:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I don't think that there's any standard function for this. It's more complicated than the standard replace family of functions. Those can operate destructively because you know in advance that you can replace element by element. Even in that case, it's still somewhat difficult to do this efficiently, because the access time for lists and vectors is very different, so general-purpose functions like subseq can be problematic. As Rainer Joswig pointed out in a comment:

It's kind of unfortunate that for many algorithms over sequences there is no single efficient implementation. I see often that there are two versions, one for lists and one for vectors, which then get hidden behind a dispatching function. For a hack a simple common version is fine, but for a library function, often there are different implementations - like shown here.

(In fact, in doing a bit of research on whether some library contains a function for this, one of the first Google results I got was a question on Code Review, Generic sequence splitter in Common Lisp, in which Rainer and I both had some comment similar to those here.)

A version for lists

However, your implementation is rather inefficient because it makes multiple copies of the the remainders of sequences. E.g., when you replace (z) in (1 z 2 z 3 z), with (x y), you'll first make (3 x y), then copy it in making (2 x y 3 z y), and then you'll copy that in making (1 x y 2 x y 3 x y). You might be better off in doing one pass over the sequence, determining the indices of the subsequences to replace, or collecting the bits that need to don't need to be replaced, etc. You'll probably want separate implementations for lists and for other sequences. E.g., with a list, you might do:

(defun splice-replace-list (old new list)
  (do ((new (coerce new 'list)) 
       (old-len (length old))
       (parts '()))
      ((endp list)
       (reduce 'append (nreverse parts) :from-end t))
    (let ((pos (search old list)))
      (push (subseq list 0 pos) parts)
      (cond 
        ((null pos)
         (setf list nil))
        (t 
         (push new parts)
         (setf list (nthcdr (+ old-len pos) list)))))))

There are some optimizations you could make here, if you wanted. For instance, you could implement a search-list that, rather than returning the position of the first instance of the sought sequence, could return a copy of the head up until that point and the tail beginning with the sequence as multiple values, or even the copied head, and the tail after the sequence, since that's what you're really interested in, in this case. Additionally, you could do something a bit more efficient than (reduce 'append (nreverse parts) :from-end t) by not reversing parts, but using a reversed append. E.g.,

(flet ((xappend (l2 l1)
         (append l1 l2)))
  (reduce #'xappend '((5 6) (x y) (3 4) (x y))))
;=> (x y 3 4 x y 5 6)

I wrote this in a somewhat imperative style, but there's no reason that you can't use a functional style if you want. Be warned that not all Lisp implementation support tail call optimization, so it might be better to use do, but you certainly don't have to. Here's a more functional version:

(defun splice-replace-list (old new list)
  (let ((new-list (coerce new 'list))
        (old-len (length old)))
    (labels ((keep-going (list parts)
               (if (endp list)
                   (reduce 'append (nreverse parts) :from-end t)
                   (let* ((pos (search old list))
                          (parts (list* (subseq list 0 pos) parts)))
                     (if (null pos)
                         (keep-going '() parts)
                         (keep-going (nthcdr (+ old-len pos) list)
                                     (list* new-list parts)))))))
      (keep-going list '()))))

A version for vectors

For non lists, this is more difficult, because you don't have the specific sequence type that you're supposed to be using for the result. This is why functions like concatenate require a result-type argument. You can use array-element-type to get an element type for the input sequence, and then use make-array to get a sequence big enough to hold the result. That's trickier code, and will be more complicated. E.g., here's a first attempt. It's more complicated, but you'll get a result that's pretty close to the original vector type:

(defun splice-replace-vector (old new vector &aux (new-len (length new)))
  (flet ((assemble-result (length parts)
           (let ((result (make-array length :element-type (array-element-type vector)))
                 (start 0))
             (dolist (part parts result)
               (cond
                 ((consp part)
                  (destructuring-bind (begin . end) part
                    (replace result vector :start1 start :start2 begin :end2 end)
                    (incf start (- end begin))))
                 (t
                  (replace result new :start1 start)
                  (incf start new-len)))))))
    (do ((old-len (length old))
         (total-len 0)
         (start 0)
         (indices '()))
        ((null start) (assemble-result total-len (nreverse indices)))
      (let ((pos (search old vector :start2 start)))
        (cond 
          ((null pos)
           (let ((vlength (length vector)))
             (push (cons start vlength) indices)
             (incf total-len (- vlength start))
             (setf start nil)))
          (t
           (push (cons start pos) indices)
           (push t indices)
           (incf total-len (- pos start))
           (incf total-len new-len)
           (setf start (+ pos old-len))))))))
CL-USER> (splice-replace-vector '(#\z) '(#\x #\y) "12z")
"12xy"
CL-USER> (splice-replace-vector '(z) '(x y) #(x y))
#(X Y)
CL-USER> (splice-replace-vector '(z) '(x y) #(1 z 2 z 3 4 z))
#(1 X Y 2 X Y 3 4 X Y)
CL-USER> (splice-replace-vector '(#\z) #(#\x #\y) "1z2z34z")
"1xy2xy34xy"

If you only want to make one pass through the input vector, then you could use an adjustable array as the output, and append to it. An adjustable array will have a bit more overhead than a fixed size array, but it does make the code a bit simpler.

(defun splice-replace-vector (old new vector)
  (do ((vlength (length vector))
       (vnew (coerce new 'vector))
       (nlength (length new))
       (result (make-array 0
                           :element-type (array-element-type vector)
                           :adjustable t
                           :fill-pointer 0))
       (start 0))
      ((eql start vlength) result)
    (let ((pos (search old vector :start2 start)))
      (cond
        ;; add the remaining elements in vector to result
        ((null pos)
         (do () ((eql start vlength))
           (vector-push-extend (aref vector start) result)
           (incf start)))
        ;; add the elements between start and pos to the result, 
        ;; add a copy of new to result, and increment start
        ;; accordingly
        (t 
         ;; the copying here could be improved with adjust-array,
         ;; and replace, instead of repeated calls to vector-push-extend
         (do () ((eql start pos))
           (vector-push-extend (aref vector start) result)
           (incf start))
         (loop for x across vnew
            do (vector-push-extend x result))
         (incf start (1- nlength)))))))

A “generic” version

Using these two functions, you could define a general splice-replace that checks the type of the original input sequence and calls the appropriate function:

(defun splice-replace (old new sequence)
  (etypecase sequence
    (list   (splice-replace-list   old new sequence))
    (vector (splice-replace-vector old new sequence))))
CL-USER> (splice-replace #(z) '(x y) #(1 z 2 z 3 4 z))
#(1 X Y 2 X Y 3 4 X Y)
CL-USER> (splice-replace '(z) #(x y) '(1 z 2 z 3 4 z))
(1 X Y 2 X Y 3 4 X Y)
share|improve this answer
    
I want to write a function that works with all types of sequences in the same way. That's why I used concatenate but I didn't know that it makes copies of every argument. Now I'm gonna think about improving of my original function. –  Mark Jun 3 '14 at 12:11
    
@Mark I don't mean this in a condescending way, but how else could it work? If you (concatenate 'list "123" "abc"), you're getting a list back, so it has to be new (because the arguments were strings). If you (concatenate 'string "123" "abc"), you're not modifying the input arguments, so you must be getting a new string, and thus copying the old strings. –  Joshua Taylor Jun 3 '14 at 12:25
    
@Mark OK, I've updated the answer to include a (splice-reverse old new sequence) that should take any types of sequences for old and new, and should give you a new sequence that's roughly the same type as sequence, and does a relatively minimal amount of copying. –  Joshua Taylor Jun 3 '14 at 12:47
2  
@Mark: It's kind of unfortunate that for many algorithms over sequences there is no single efficient implementation. I see often that there are two versions, one for lists and one for vectors, which then get hidden behind a dispatching function. For a hack a simple common version is fine, but for a library function, often there are different implementations - like shown here. –  Rainer Joswig Jun 3 '14 at 13:23
    
@JoshuaTaylor, Thank for your time and explanations, I will keep this lesson in my mind. Lists are built from cons so it's easy to append something to them, while arrays occupy solid block of memory and extending means reallocation. So it's right thing to allocate memory once, like you did. I knew it, but never thought about efficiency of my LISP functions... –  Mark Jun 3 '14 at 17:16

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