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I have a string such as "big bad dog", how can I get an string[] array which includes all the possible word/phrase combinations?

So, I would like to return "big", "bad", "dog", "big bad", "bad dog" and "big bad dog" - therefore the order of the words in the original string must be respected.

Is this something that could be done with a regular expression?

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2  
What about "Big Dog"? as it still preserves the ordering, but ignores the middle word. –  Josh Mar 8 '10 at 13:28
    
I've recently done a "bruteforce-like" routine that does exaclty that, but with letters. It doesn't use regular expressions, or i'd post it here –  Marcelo Mar 8 '10 at 13:30
2  
When you learn regex, everything looks like a nail... –  cjk Mar 8 '10 at 14:30
    
Good point about "Big Dog" but no that should not count. I guess a better way of putting it is that I need all words/phrases that are consecutive. –  Stuart Mar 8 '10 at 15:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think this is a nice problem to solve recursively. My take:

public static String[] findWords(params string[] args)
{

        if (args.Count() == 0)
        {
            return new String[] { "" };
        }
        else
        {
            String[] oldWords = findWords(args.Skip(1).ToArray());
            String[] newWords = oldWords.Where(word => word == "" || word.Split(new String[] { " " }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries)[0] == args[1])
                                        .Select(word => (args[0] + " " + word).Trim()).ToArray();

            return oldWords.Union(newWords).ToArray();
        }
} 

A findWords("big", "bad", "dog") returns your list of phrases.

Edit: Edited to only include consecutive phrases.

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This solves the problem but doesn't fully answer the OPs question. –  Jeff Yates Mar 8 '10 at 14:10
    
True, sorry. I promise to read better in the future =) –  Jens Mar 8 '10 at 14:26
    
Thanks Jens, this is pretty much what i wanted. Only one small problem (which i didn't explain in my original post) and that is I only want consecutive words or phrases so "big dog" should not be a match. Is there a tweak you can make to your code? –  Stuart Mar 8 '10 at 15:54
    
@Stuart: Edited. It looses elegance, though =) –  Jens Mar 8 '10 at 16:26
    
Hi @Jen, that's great. Thanks a lot. Hopefully my gratitude will make up in some small way for the loss of elegance of your code! :) –  Stuart Mar 8 '10 at 17:04
string[] array = new string[]{"big", "bad", "dog"};
for(ulong mask = 0; mask < (1ul << array.Length); mask++)
{
    string permutation = "";
    for(int i = 0; i < array.Length;  i++)
    {
        if((mask & (1ul << (array.Length - 1 - i))) != 0)
        {
            permutation += array[i] + " ";
        }
    }
    Console.WriteLine(permutation);
}

EDIT: No, it can not be done using only a single regular expression.

EDIT: Per Eric Lippert, change masks to ulong (UInt64).

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This solves the problem but doesn't fully answer the OPs question. –  Jeff Yates Mar 8 '10 at 14:09
2  
And what if there are more than 32 words? (I know, it'll take a while to get through the first four billion, but machines are fast these days.) –  Eric Lippert Mar 8 '10 at 15:03

What about splitting the string into array of separate words

string str = "big fat dog";
string[] words = str.Split(new Char[] { ' ', ',', '.', ':', '\t' });

and then you can use this to make word combinations

string[] words = new string[]{"big", "bad", "dog"}; 
for(int mask = 0; mask < 1 << (words.Length); mask++) 
{ 
  string permutation = ""; 
  for(int i = 0; i < words.Length;  i++) 
  { 
    if((mask & (1 << (words.Length - 1 - i))) != 0) 
    { 
      permutation += words[i] + " "; 
    } 
  } 
  Console.WriteLine(permutation); 
}

I think regular expresion has no use here.

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This solves the problem but doesn't fully answer the OPs question. –  Jeff Yates Mar 8 '10 at 14:09
    
It doesn't? Please, can I leave it like this, Mrs teacher? –  Machta Mar 8 '10 at 14:29

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